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My wife is getting a led lighting strip put in under her cabinets. It is a strip about 1/3 inch wide with a sticky back and a small LED about every inch or so. There are places to cut it every 2-3 inches where there are metal tabs that you would put some sort of connector to join with your 12 volt electrical system. Seems like an easy way to get light in all kinds of places in a boat. On the real was "EIAJ-RRM12B AND ZZH002"

Any body know more? Any body used them on a boat?

rdw
 

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Cool, but be aware all LEDs are not created equal.

We put battery operated LEDs under our bimini in our cockpit. Perfect amount of light at night from a two very small bulbs. They each take two watch style batteries and only run for about 15-20 hrs before needing the batts changed. I bought a pack of 20 already this winter for next season.
 

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I use 18-inch LED light strips for my music gear, powered with a tiny 12-volt power pack. Incredibly bright, draw next to nothing for power, and I know they would be great in any marine situation.

I also use LED rope lights, 16-footers, that are attached to each toe rail. Lights up the entire side of the boat and no chance that someone will run into you in the middle of the night while anchored. They're solar powered and stay bright for about 12 hours. I turn them off while running, though.

Cheers,

Gary :cool:
 

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I have use marine LED strip by Lunasea. They are outstanding. They are of course 12 volt. Come in 24 or 12 inch lengths.

Buy Warm White of for the interior of the sailboat. Excellent color and easy on the eyes.
As was mentioned LED lights are not all the same. Don't buy the cheapest you will regret or live with poor results.
Good luck. Can buy them online, 24 is about $45 to $50.for the strips.
 

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Here's the strips I use for my music gear, more than enough to light the entire interior or most boats using just two of the 18-inch strips. However, because they are so intense, I recommend using some sort of shielding to prevent eye damage from looking directly into the intense light. Oh, and no heat whatsoever.

Gary :cool:
 

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I used these for lighting on my boat:
HitLights Weatherproof Warm White SMD3528 LED Light Strip - 300 LEDs, 16.4 Ft Roll, Cut to Length - 3000K, 149 Lumens per foot, Requires 12V DC, IP65
(Amazon description). They're great and silicone coated for weather resistance. The silicone makes it a little more trouble to make electrical connections but they sell an uncoated indoor version as well.
 

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I've found that the easiest thing to do is to get 12V LED strips or "ribbons" from the auto parts store. That way you can be pretty well assured that they will handle any voltages normally seen in an auto or marine "12V" system (remember, your alternator cranks out up to 14V or so when your engine is on). I also use a couple of battery-powered LED lamps in the V-berth, to save me from running wire.
 

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We have 6 feet of LED strip lighting on the underside of the bar connecting our dinghy davits. They are powered through a pull cord switch. When we dinghy-up at night, I pull the cord without getting out of the dink. It lights-up the whole transom area for boarding. The power draw is so low, I've purposely left them on all day so it's easier to find the boat when returning that night.

I put a 16" strip under the rim of wood at the top of the circuit breaker panel above our chart table. It lights up the chart table excellently. The panel is hinged at the bottom and when I open the panel the strip light stays in place. So the same LED strip light illuminates the wiring behind the panel. Double duty.

I'm planning to put strip lights in my engine compartment at key locations, and may even sew them into the noise-absorbing material on the sides. That way, changing the oil and checking things overall will be easier and simpler.

Finally, I'm thinking about using a strip around the mast, maybe 9 feet above the deck. Good anti-collision lighting and it would make it easier to find the boat in a crowded anchorage or at night.

Regards,
Brad
 

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Beneteau 393
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I have used some LED strips and find they do not last long. Probably because even though they say they are 12 volts they are not good for a boat because they need exactly 12 volts. Remember on a boat your wiring may have 14.4 when you are charging.

So theres a few things you can do:
Buy cheap ones and expect to change them about every 18 months
Buy expensive ones fro a marine shop
Buy some sort of regulated power supply. These are i two types, tiny for just one curcuit, or huge for the whole boat

Whatever way you do, you will like the stip lights, they are great for indirect lighting.... And colours!
 
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Mine are going on 3 years and still working like a charm. I believe the technology improves very quickly- the latest ones I installed seem much better than the first ones I bought 3 years ago. The warm LEDs now have the same light as incandesent bubs (at least to my eye). As far as failing from higher or lower voltage, I think long before they fail you'll notice the light output diminishing. At the current price, it doesn't seem like much of a problem, even if they only last 5 years or so.
 

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I have used some LED strips and find they do not last long. Probably because even though they say they are 12 volts they are not good for a boat because they need exactly 12 volts. Remember on a boat your wiring may have 14.4 when you are charging.

So theres a few things you can do:
Buy cheap ones and expect to change them about every 18 months
Buy expensive ones fro a marine shop
Buy some sort of regulated power supply. These are i two types, tiny for just one curcuit, or huge for the whole boat

Whatever way you do, you will like the stip lights, they are great for indirect lighting.... And colours!
We live aboard and have these strips on all day, every day so I was concerned about this too. My charger is putting out 13.3VDC most of the time in float plus the occasional 14+VDC in bulk/absorbance so I was planning on your option 1. However, I've seen no diminution of brightness or other evidence of harm in the 12 months I've had them. Not to say it won't still be a problem but I'm pretty happy with how it's been going.
 

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Just a reminder that circuit breakers and fuses protect wires. The tiny wires that these strip light use will certainly require something less than 15 amp over-current protection.

Plan on an inline 2 amp fuse to drive several of these. Or rather, use a fuse value/rating that's recommended for the actual wire size.

Regards,
Brad
 
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Over 4 years ago Manny changed all our interior lights to LED. We couldn't find LED bulbs that would fit our fixtures and couldn't afford to buy all new LED fixtures, so he came up with a project: DIY affordable LED lights for your boat

He wired LED strips in all the fixtures to replace the bulbs. They have worked great and reduced our electrical draw substantialy. Today, there are many other different types of cheap LEDS that could do the job too. But we are happy with what we've got.
Robyn
 

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I've seen no diminution of brightness or other evidence of harm in the 12 months I've had them.
Mine didnt dim... They burnt out progressively. And they were the resin cover ones.

Mind you, mine were bought from an Oriental Emporium in the back streets of New Yorks China Town and Mr Whung Hung Row guaranteed them for 50,000 years or "you come back, I give you my daughter... In fact I give you both." :eek:
 

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Super Fuzzy
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Heat heat heat. One of the big problems with LED strip mounted directly is that the diodes themselves overheat. Its pretty obvious but fire up an LED strip and check the heat at the back. The best way to install LED strip is to mount it either in an aluminium extrusion or on an aluminium bar. Extrusion is good cos you can then install an opaque diffuser, which although it will slightly reduce light output it does make the light more even and to my eye more comfortable.

Mark ... (of SeaLife) yes over voltage can be a problem with LED. It will increase the light output but decrease the diode's lifespan. Regulator would make good sense. Otoh, 18 odd months is still very short even if being occasionally over powered.
 

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$50 a yard at the hardware store. Or $15-25 per reel of five yards from online sources. There are differences in LED color and type, look for the type numbers and you'll see comparisons online. They are usually "4" volt white LEDs grouped in groups of three, which is how they work on 12V and have to be cut apart every group of three if you cut them.

And they are meant for just 12 volts, if you feed them 14.4 they will be brighter and burn out sooner. If you feed them from a regulated 12-volt supply or an inexpensive 12-volt regulator, they'll last much longer. But as $20reel...a lot of folks would just use 'em and replace 'em when or if needed.

Beware the cheapest source, some are selling either very old, abused, or counterfeit goods. Real "3M" adhesive (which is usually continuous, not just spots) doesn't ooze goo from the sides of the reels unless someone stored it in a very hot place for a very long time.
 
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