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Someone went fishing for rocks with my keel and I need to fill a 3/4" deep gouge on the leading edge of my keel. Any advice for a newbie to keel repair would be appreciated. With all the products about there I have no idea where to start. Thanks!
 

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Grind out any dirt that's on the surface of the divot in the lead and fill it in with thickened epoxy. I am partial to West System, but others work fine, too.
Fair it out smooth with your angle disk grinder and paint it.

Loren
 

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epoxy, (west or others) is plastic with amazing properties. The filler is any of or a mixture of products you mix in the liquid to make a slurry, paste, or putty. woodworkers like to use wood flour and or "micro ballons" for easy sanding. Boats below the water line use silca and or fairing filler. Of all the fillers silica (cabosil) is the most stone like and most difficult to sand. epoxy should adhere to clean rough lead should and let you shape it like new. "Bondo" may work but it's not epoxy and may not adhere as well.

Good read here; Practical Sailor - Keels: Minor Maintenance and Repair - Tips Article
"With the lead clean and bright, fill corroded areas immediately with an epoxy filler. The best epoxy fillers for this purpose are the ones you make yourself from epoxy resin, such as the Gougeon Brothers West System epoxy, and a filler such as phenolic microballoons or microspheres. Remember that lead is pretty soft, and you don't want your filler to be significantly harder than the surrounding material.

When filling, give the area to be faired a prime coat of unfilled epoxy before applying the thickened epoxy mixture. This will allow a better bond between the filler and the surface. You can allow the clear epoxy to partially kick off before over-coating with filler, but don't let it cure completely or you'll get a poor bond.

When the filler has cured, sand or plane it level and smooth. A belt sander or conventional hand bench plane can be used, since lead planes almost as easily as wood.

With all corroded areas and damaged areas cleaned and filled, sand or wire brush the rest of the keel to bright metal. A belt sander or disc sander works fine here, although proper use of either tool to avoid gouging the surface takes a little practice. A lead keel is far easier to bring to bright metal than an iron keel. The fin keel of a 30-footer can be done in an hour or so.

To make sure your keel doesn't begin to corrode again, you must completely isolate the surface of the keel from the bottom paint with an epoxy barrier."
 
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