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Hi All,

I suspect this is purley a personal preference thing. It's time to purchase a life ring bouy or horse collar today (sale prices) and just want to hear what your preferences are and why. Do you also have a life sling?

Dave
 

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sunfish?junior?
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Oh You have money to pitch at the boat.:D Good for you. I was hoping to see someone posting it is fun to watch. I am not sure but I think Canada has an Opinion as to what might be better on boat over some lengths.
I am waiting for the mob to reply. I have no advice and might learn from this.
Did you do a search for life ring
Good day, Lou
 

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Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
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my personal opinion (which is worth what you are paying for it) is that life rings are easier to throw
 

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snake charmer, cat herder
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i think i have one of each but i will trade one,prolly the life sling,if i indeed have it , for something much more useful to me.....
my boat has a ring i use to hold stuff on boat when sailing. makes a decent altho uncomfortable cushion, but a lot more comfortable than that dreadful horseshoe.
ring is also an awesome water dish holder for bubba´s water while under way.
 

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Where i'm at life ring is a requirement. Horse shoe is useful for cleaning waterline as you can sit on it like a saddle and float at waterline for the cleaning job.
 

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Hi All,

I suspect this is purley a personal preference thing. It's time to purchase a life ring bouy or horse collar today (sale prices) and just want to hear what your preferences are and why. Do you also have a life sling?

Dave
Horse Collar:


Terminology is important!:D

In Canada life rings are required on boats over 29' 6" as they are easier to throw with accuracy. They are not thrown directly at the person in the water as a direct hit could end with a concussion.:eek:

In the US I believe you have a choice.

ps A life ring is hard plastic with internal flotation. They would make a lousy cushion.
 

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Collar and a life sling and a mob pole and a floating strobe and a throw line
 

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I have three, all attached with the proper length of retrieval line. The life ring and the horseshoe are easiest to throw and with a bit more accuracy, but depending on who I am actually throwing it to, I'll use the anchor shaped one. :)
 

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I think that it doesnt matter as long as they are soft getting hit on the head by a hard one would likely finish you off.
 

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The only life rings approved in Canada are hard plastic. Of course a soft one can be carried but the hard one is mandatory.
 

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We carry a (required) hard ring... btw I think there's a legal minimum diameter - and a Lifesling.
 

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They are 24" or 30". They come in 2 types, standard and Solas for commercial vessels. Solas have more buoyancy. Colored white or orange. Most recreational vessels carry the 24".
 

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Have you excluded throw bags? A nylon bag typically with 50-75' of line in it, designed so you throw the bag to the MOB (while holding onto a line that comes out of it!) and they grab the bag. Then you pull them in. Because the bag is designed to just hold the bulk of the line, it is easier to throw out to the victim, and if it hits them, it won't hurt them.

There's some discussion of requiring these now in the more recent USSA accident studies, because they work so nicely.
 

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Have you excluded throw bags? A nylon bag typically with 50-75' of line in it, designed so you throw the bag to the MOB (while holding onto a line that comes out of it!) and they grab the bag. Then you pull them in. Because the bag is designed to just hold the bulk of the line, it is easier to throw out to the victim, and if it hits them, it won't hurt them.
Both throw bags and soft horseshoe shaped collars are good but have to be in addition to the round hard ring approved in Canada.
 

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sunfish?junior?
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If you enter the waters or port of a foreign country Canada, form the USA or USA to BVI. does your vessel need to meet all the safety rules and regulations of that locality ? Life ring may become a wise choice if this is the case ?
Please state how you know the rules or give information as to where to search.
Good day, Lou
 

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If you enter the waters or port of a foreign country Canada, form the USA or USA to BVI. does your vessel need to meet all the safety rules and regulations of that locality ? Life ring may become a wise choice if this is the case ?
Please state how you know the rules or give information as to where to search.
Good day, Lou
Some contradictory info on this. From the first part of the web page addressing this for Canada:

Welcome to the country with the world's longest coastline and greatest concentration of freshwater lakes. We invite you to explore Canada's waterways responsibly. All recreational boaters, both foreign and domestic, are expected to know the rules that govern their safe enjoyment in Canadian waters.

Once in Canadian waters, you must follow the rules that govern safety equipment, the safe operation of your pleasure craft, and protection of the environment that apply in Canada. Watch for boating restrictions such as speed limits or vessel prohibitions.
However on the following 'safety equipment' paragraph there's this:

Foreign pleasure craft (pleasure craft that are licensed or registered in a country other than Canada) need to comply with equipment requirements of the country in which the vessel is usually kept.
So it would seem than a US vessel in Canada for a visit can get by with a Horseshoe buoy as long as it's legal in the USA.

The link:

Visitor Information - Transport Canada
 
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Those countries which follow the UN Laws of the Seas agreement, which is most of the world, have all agreed that vessels "engaged in navigation" i.e. those in transit, only need to meet the mandatory safety equipment and licensing that are required in their home ports. Licenses, certifications, safety equipment, all must meet the laws of your flag and are not subject to the rules of other venues--as long as you are engaged in navigation, in transit, and just passing through. That includes the usual tourist trips.
 
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