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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
Yeah, I was thinking that if we're all comfortable in the same brand vest, it would be best so we could keep the same re-arm kits and use them for whatever vest we have if anybody falls in. A re-arm kit seems like a good thing to just keep on the boat. Good tip to inflate the vest in order to properly adjust the straps. Do they all have a manual blow-up option?
 
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Most if not all inflatables have a blow up option via your mouth. This way if the cannister does not inflate it all the way, you can, or if in the water a big, it starts to deflate say due to colder water, you can increase it.

Having all of the same pfds is good as you say, so you only need one or two rearm kits on the boat at any given time. Especially since they run about $30-50 per kit! depending upon the type etc.

Marty
 

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I'm a big believer in the KISS principle but I think inflatables are the only way to go for one simple reason - they get WORN.

When you lose your footing or get hit by something and go over the side, a vest in a cockpit locker won't do any good at all.
 

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One thing that is not mentioned on this thread which I had an issue with was the inflation initiation difference.

Some inflatables will inflate if you are hit by a wave from the side. When the water hits you, you will be startled when the vest inflates. This does depend on where you plan to sail of course.

If your going to the open water of the gulf, Caribbean sea, or ocean, you will definitely want to consider a hydrostatic firing device like the expensive Mustang offers. It's won't fire unless you go under water. The system requires the outside pressure of the water to be high before setting off the inflation. Some thing like 8 inches under water.

After a few times of having a wave come over the bow and set off your cheaper inflatable, you will be quite aggravated, and probably order the Mustang anyway.

It was one of the first things I considered. I will be buying the Mustangs.

This post is unfortunately irrelevant to fit.

James L
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
It's still a really good consideration. I am kind of leaning toward the Mustang or something equivalent for that reason.
 

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One thing I think is worthwhile adding to this thread (obviously I have no input on fit or style for Brigala) is that any vest you pick out should be put on - and then at the very first safe opportunity you should jump over the side and test it.

Recharging is a couple bucks, knowing how it works, fits and feels during the time you count on it most is priceless, and you can then recharge/reload it.
I practice what I preach, at least once a year I put on an auto-inflate and jump in.
 

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Ouch,

With a mustang it's a little more than a few bucks (about $75.00 the last time I checked).

Still a very good idea for a person to know they can rely on the equipment they are using.

Most people test them out when time to recharge. For a HIT Mustang, I think that is every 5 years.

James L
 

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Cost me 16 bucks for recharge kit on my WM's - both the co2's and a salt tablet's.
I even let kids wear them and take the leap.

If I get enough water over the bow of my (previously) Gemini catamaran, or (now) Irwin 38 center cockpit to set it off accidently - well I supposed I deserve the surprise.
 

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Cost me 16 bucks for recharge kit on my WM's - both the co2's and a salt tablet's.
I even let kids wear them and take the leap.

If I get enough water over the bow of my (previously) Gemini catamaran, or (now) Irwin 38 center cockpit to set it off accidently - well I supposed I deserve the surprise.
But I put the information out there for people to know. It would be the last thing I would want happening in that kind of weather.

If you a fair weather sailor and can avoid the blow, that is great. I just want to be prepared for what if. :D

James L
 

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Mark, some long time ago we were running water samples and bottom profiles in 34F water and a discussion came up about whether to wear life jackets over or under the parkas, and whether it would make any difference anyhow since the ship we were on couldn't round up and come back for you before your lungs froze up in any case.

The wise old man in charge of things said just wear the life jackets, with whatever has the highest visibility on the outside. Not because it will make any difference in how long you live, but simply as a courtesy to those poor SOBs conducting the SAR operations, so they can find your body quickly and go back home again.

The logic still works for me. Someone thinks they're invulnerable, fine, no argument here. But they'd damn well better have the courtesy to make life easier on the SAR guys.

Oddly enough, when they hear "the only difference is how quickly we can recover your body" they start to question the invulnerability aspect as well.
Well and Wisly said.
 

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You horrible guys should not pick on her, being a well endowed miniature lady who farms sheep is bad enough without you picking on her....
 
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