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The Pearson 26 does not have the form stability that a similar sized power boat does. Removing the keel completely does not sound like a good idea to me.
 

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just a small thread shift. working out how to move a stanchion outboard a few millimeters seems to be pretty small problem in the scheme of the project. perhaps not ever putting the boat in the water with people aboard would be a satisfactory solution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I agree that it has less form stability than most powerboats, and a wider / flatter stern boat would have been a better choice.

I'm pretty sure I can get the COG low enough to have plenty of stability though. There are plenty of power boats with similar hull forms. Look at the bartender series for example.

I don't think there is a safety risk if I add enough low ballast to satisfy the tests. The real risk is probably too low of an initial stability so that it feels tippy before it stiffens up.

Look at all the centerboard / water ballast trailer sailboats. The newer (x & m) MacGregors aside they don't have all that much more form stability.
 

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I’d be surprised if your boat doesn’t turn turtle when you first launch it off the trailer on day one.
 

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The simplified stability test is designed for monohull powerboats and addresses most of those concerns. How you predict the results before launching requires considerable infomation. Installing batteries low will help, but I'm not guessing how much, just following. But I think 8 people on such a boat sounds like a really, really bad idea. Not enough form stability, even with batteries low. Keeping a portion of the external keel would have been my thought. More likely, I would have removed the rig, installed the solar and batteries, and then decided based on waterline.
 
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