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I'm replacing lifelines; maybe stanchions too.

I've noticed that some boats have upper and lower lifelines and some have just uppers. What's the deciding factor?
 

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I replaced the stanchions,lifelines. bow pulpit and gates on a Columbia 36. It started when a crew member bent the original pulpit by hitting a pylon while docking. The "new, old stock" pulpit bought used had twin lifeline fittings and the bowlight mount attached. so, we removed the below deck level "bugeyes" port and starboard lights to a more modern combination bow light on the top rail of the pulpit. In order to keep the spinnaker turtle on deck in heavy conditions we decided to replace the stanchions with double holes for two strands of lifeline. That then required double lifeline gates both port and starboard. ( Back to Minney's yacht salvage who had 37" stanchions and gates from former builders).

The lifeline hardware is the expensive part for pelican hooks, tensioners, and adjustable fitting fore and aft of each terminus. You will also need heavy duty bolt cutters with swaging dies and smaller swaging tools ( bolt operated).
Decide which stanchion bases you want and be prepared for sealing and back plating the deck area for each stanchion. Make sure you have below deck clearance for the bolt pattern and backing plates, especially in the quarter deck and lazarette areas. Obviously the new stanchions had a different bolt pattern than the old and required filling and sanding the old holes and repainting the area of the deck exposed.

The basic decision was for more security on deck and less opportunity for people or objects going overboard. Definitely a two person job securing the finishing nuts with either vice grips or a socket while the on deck person silicones and threads the on deck base fittings. Had to add terminus fittings to the remaining stern pushpit for the new lower lifelines.

Overall it gave the boat a more modern and secure look.
 

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Very simple. ORC (Ocean Racing Council) regulations # 3.14.5/ Table 7. Boats 28 feet or more are required to have two sets of lifelines.

on a catamaran - lifelines from bow to stern on each hull and transverse lifelines to form an effectively continuous barrier around the working area for man-overboard prevention. The transverse lifelines shall be attached to bow and stern pulpits or superstructure. A webbing, strop or rope (minimum diameter 6mm) shall be rove zig-zag between the transverse lifelines and the net.Mu0,1,2,3,4
3.14.5Lifeline Height, Vertical Openings, Number of Lifelines
TABLE 7**
under 8.5 m(28 ft)before January 1992taut single lifeline at a height of no less than 450 mm (18 in) above the working deck. No vertical opening shall exceed 560 mm (22 in).**
under 8.5 m(28 ft)January 1992 and afteras for under 8.5 m(28 ft) in table 7 above, except that when an intermediate lifeline is fitted no vertical opening shall exceed 380 mm (15 in).**
8.5 m (28 ft) and overbefore January 1993taut double lifeline with upper lifeline at a height of no less than 600 mm (24 in) above the working deck. No vertical opening shall exceed 560 mm (22 in)**
8.5 m (28 ft)and overJanuary 1993 and afteras 8.5 m (28 ft) and over in Table 7 above, except that no vertical opening shall exceed 380 mm (15 in).**
allallon yachts with intermediate lifelines the intermediate line shall be not less than 230 mm (9 in) above the working deck.**
 

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But if you don' race.....
Looks like they would help keep stuff on the boat if you cruise some.
A place to tie the bottom half of netting.
 

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No doubt depends on the boat, skipper and useage. I don't have life lines on my 21 ft boat. Kids 3 and 7. The boat doesn't have lifelines and never has.
20201003_132848.jpg
 

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The ORC safety requirements have little to do with racing and everything to do with safety. The ORC standards parallel the CE Standards for the various use ratings, and with ABYC Standards.

So even if you are not racing, they are not a bad guideline to consider. My typical recommendation is if you have a boat that has less than a 24" stanchion height then a Single life line makes sense. If 24" or taller than double life lines make sense.

By the way, I am replacing my life lines and stanchions. I needed custom made stanchion bases to fit where the old stanchions had been, and went with Garhauer. I also had them made with a heavier base plate and more robust braces. I thought they did a great job and that the price was very reasonable even as compared to stock off the shelf stanchions and bases from other manufacturers.

Jeff
 
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Lifelines are to prevent sliding falls, and people even slide under double lifelines.

And don't forget the toe rail. It is at least as important and is often far too low. It needs to solidly catch a shoe when sliding, wet. I like about 2 inches.
 
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