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Discussion Starter #1
I recently bought a 1983 Oday 22. I'd like to inspect the centerboard & such. I work for several marinas and have access to lots of toys, like forklifts and operators.

For a six pack of beer, I can have my boat lifted with a fork.

I suspect this is not a great idea...? Does anybody have any knowledge?

I can always grab my SCUBA stuff, but that's more headache than handing off a six pack :grin
 

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If by 'forklift' you mean the dedicated dry-storage marina type of forklift with long (likely padded) forks the only concern might be that the sailboat would have more rocker (fore-aft curvature) than the average speedboat.. but you could probably add some support at the ends, esp if it's only for an inspection or a relatively short lift.

Even stuffing some fenders bow and sternward might get you by.
 

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Borrow a trailer instead? A nice catalina 22 trailer might be a better choice.

I do think with proper attention to pressure points with a motorboat style lift you could make it work.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
All the marinas have proper travel lifts, but they all have a roof over them. I'd have to drop the mast. Not that big of a deal, but I'm lazy ;-) Hmmm, I can just have them lift it off the trailer with the lift. I'll have to see if my trailer bunks will interfere.

Yes, they are proper marine forklifts, with the giant, padded forks. Mostly Wiggins Marina Bulls, in a variety of sizes.
 

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If it's a marina, why doesn't it have open-end traveling lifts to lift sailboats and boats with fly Bridges? I don't even visualize a lift with a a roof over it.
 

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Here is how a local marina lifted a keel boat with a forklift (click on picture thunbnail to view full size). They used a travelift strap on a forklift This forklift lifts powerboats up to 40' long. They have a Travelift with the cab on the side for larger vessels. Catalina insisted this C165K sailboat be lifted with a travelift with straps. Because of the keel, they were adamantly against using a forklift and placing it on the fork. Note that boat is on straps and not on the bunks. The mast was lowered on the straps, after it was pulled from the water.
 

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My first marina had an old Hyster forklift that launched everything from 25' and less every year....carpeted forks. Worked very well...never a problem.
 

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I was uncomfortable when my 2500# catboat-more than 25 yrs ago--was lifted with a forklift, using padded forks directly on the hull, but it was not a problem. Since then my 3500# powerboat has been launched and retrieved multiple times with a forklift, without any issues.
 

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Back in the day I worked for a marina with nothing but forks. Seasonal haul of of sailboats up to 30' was routine. It can be delicate work but very doable. Plan the lift and go slow.
 

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If it's a keelboat use a travelift or a forklift with straps to grab hull from underneath. If it's a centerboard boat you can just use the forks on the forklift. CEnterboard boats are built to ride on bunks similar to the forks on the forklift.
 

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Let us know what you wind up doing, and how it goes regardless... these are the kinds of threads that I'd rather know if everything went OK regardless of what you wound up doing.
 

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Where we keep the boat they have used forklift for the last 40 years, the one in this picture has some adaptions done to make i easier to use, hydraulic operated strap adjustment and stopper on the end of gaff to prevent the sling sliding off. Launching a boat like mine take less than 30 minutes from they put the straps in place until boat is floating, For larger boats (like mine 38) the plan for 60 minutes when lifting out - extra time is for putting supports in place.



 

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Discussion Starter #14
Update-

As hoped, it was a completely boring experience to have the guys lift my boat with a fork. Nothing exciting at all.

The bottom seems fine, and I need to cut a pair of 3/16 shims for the centerboard. Easy.

Now I just need to figure out how to get this off the trailer in my shop sometime this winter. I don't have a lift :-(
 

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Update-

As hoped, it was a completely boring experience to have the guys lift my boat with a fork. Nothing exciting at all.

The bottom seems fine, and I need to cut a pair of 3/16 shims for the centerboard. Easy.

Now I just need to figure out how to get this off the trailer in my shop sometime this winter. I don't have a lift :-(
You could rent hydraulic or mechanical jacks to lift the boat and block it incrementally as you work the trailer out of the way. I used a mechanical house jack on a boat in your weight category to facilitate gel coat removal on a boat that I had on a trailer.

You could use wooden cribbing or concrete blocks to support the keel and construct a wood cradle with cross ties to stabilize the boat. Otherwise you could buy new Brownell shoring stands (aka jack stands or poppets) at about $600 for 4, if you can’t find used ones or a marina that will rent them.
 

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In 1989 I had my O'Day 30 trucked from San Fransisco (Vallejo) to Everett, WA. I was aghast when the yard that accepted the delivery lifted her from the truck to a cradle with a forklift. It was/is a dry storage yard and everything went well. After putting her all back together, she was launched with the forklift and taken to Anacortes, WA.
If you are going to the local rent-all shop to rent a forklift for a DIY bottom survey, I would caution against it. If it is going to be lifted by a dry storage yard that does it daily in their business, then they would likely have no issues with the lift. Ask the yard manager about their history lifting 22 foot sailboats.
LHO
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Iho- It's neat watching the guys who know what they are doing move boats around. I'm good with a trailer, but I have no business playing with a fork ;-)

One of the marinas where I work regularly lifts 37' powerboats. No worries. (for them)

The worry was about 10 years ago- New 33' SeaRay on the forks, with a very experienced yard guy driving. BOOM!!

Unknown to anyone, a sink hole had formed under the yard. A hole about 15' across and 15' deep ate the forward wheels of the fork. The back wheels were still on the unbroken concrete pavement, the boat and forks were resting on the pavement, and most of the fork was in the hole.

Er- Hey boss, you want to come look at this...?
 

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A tragic story. Was the SeaRay damaged? I guess the same sink hole could have sucked in a travel lift.
LHO
 

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P.S. I see you're from Detroit. I sailed for years out of the Toledo YC and the Oscoda YC. I enjoyed the Great Lakes, but you don't have crabs.
LHO
 
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