SailNet Community banner

1 - 20 of 77 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My husband and I would like to retire and fullfill a life long dream of buying a sailboat and living aboard. We are unsure where to begin with locating a marina in Florida that allows live aboards. Any suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
995 Posts
What part of Florida, what type of sailboat?

If you are thinking about living aborad in SE Fl, dream on unless you have a lot of money to buy a house and stick your boat behind it. There are some marinas, but there are not a lot.

On the SW side of Florida, it is better - but not a whole lot better. There are several marinas you can liveaboard, but the fees are quite high (I think it averages around $17/foot/month), and you will be restricted by mast height and how much you draw. The bridges on SW Fl ICW are 55'.

I have not liveaboard or cruised NE or NW Florida, but understand Pensacola is quite nice from friends of ours that did.

You might really consider spending most of your time on the hook. Marinas are over rated, expensive, and unneccesary in many areas.

Give me some thoughts and what you want to do (specifics), I will give you some ideas on how to go about it.

- CD
 

·
Telstar 28
Joined
·
993 Posts
I'd second spending most of your time on the hook. If the boat is properly outfitted, you really won't need much in the way of shore power, water or the other amenities that you get with a marina slip except on the occasional basis.

You can setup a boat to be self-sufficient in terms of electrical power, without requiring that you run the engine or a generator all the time.

You can sail out pass the three-mile limit once a week to empty the holding tank if you have the tank setup properly.

That only leaves food and hygiene requirements. Food is pretty doable, with a weekly or bi-monthly grocery store run, especially if you have a refrigerator on-board. Showering can be done using a solar shower.

Be aware that living aboard is heavily restricted in many parts of Florida, and if you're anywhere near one of those areas, you'll be bullied by the local law enforcement more likely than not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the information. At this point, we have just begun to look for places to check the price of living aboard. We currently have a 24' fishing boat that we house at a marina at Placida, Florida. However, we are within a year of retirement and are beginning to think of buying a sailboat. They do not allow live aboards at this marina. We would like to sail about 6 months out of the year. At times, we might like to live aboard in a marina. We think we want about a 40' catamaran but would welcome pros and cons about these types of sailing vessels. As we have never owned one before, we need all the advice we can get.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,503 Posts
May I suggest a week or two cruise on a sailboat, to see if this is something you really want to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My husband has done that before and has actually taken sailing lessons. I have grown up on the water but have never sailed. Love being on the water though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
995 Posts
Ok Snook,

I will give you my advice. That is all it is, advice.

Living Aboard, FL

Contrary to the many negative comments you will hear me (and others) say about living aboard in Fl, the state does promote boating and cruising. It is a nice place to live aboard. THere are a lot of state parks and lots of places that have not and will not be developed. The wildlife is great and you are at the gateway to most of the world (including the Bahamas, which is an easy run). One of these days Castro will kick over, and I would imagine our govt's policy towards them will change (if his brother is not worse, which he could be). Regardless, it is a nice place to boat... honestly.

Now, there are many hurdles. Finding a place to put your boat is the biggest. The regulations and difficulty of developing more land for boat use (in addition to the large number of boaters) as really made slips difficult to find and expensive. In addition, many parts are inaccessible to large boats and the water is very shallow. Insurance is the most expensive of anywhere in the country (to the best of my knowledge). The area is hurricane prone and there are storms every day it seems in the summer.

The Boat:

I like catamarans a lot (don't let SD hear me say that). THey are roomy and I think they are safe. They have a shallow draft which opens up many areas that are not open to others. However, I do not think they are a good choice if you are primaarily going to be around Fl. As I said before, finding a place to put any boat is tough (esp liveaboard), now restrict it further with that floating condo, and you will really be limited. Fl is not the best place for Cats. It is not the boat, it is the area.

Since you are primarily cruising the US coast and islands, you should look into a production type of boat, like a Catalina 350 and up... that is what they were built for. It will serve you well anywhere in this hemisphere from Canada to Brazil. They are comfortable and will allow many amenities. As far as where to put it, if you are not F/T Fl, why not park it in NC or Texas where the slippage is vastly less expensive? Also realize that many insurance companies will not allow you to keep the boat in FL during hurricane season unnattended.

If you have some more questions, let me know... I will answer them as best as I can.

- CD

PS THere are other boats besides Catalina to consider... I was just naming them off the top of my head.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts

·
Telstar 28
Joined
·
993 Posts
Cruisingdad said:
I like catamarans a lot (don't let SD hear me say that).
Well said CD... and I heard the part about the cats.. ;) You will fall to the dark side... oh...wait that's what catalinas are...

Dock space for catamarans, especially larger ones can be very difficult. The smaller cats, like the MaineCat 30 and the Gemini 105, aren't as bad, since these boats only have a beam of 14' or so... and will fit in a larger single slip.

A lot of companies dropped Florida as a state they would cover...and the companies that remain active in the state are pretty expensive.

CD's suggestion of NC or Texas (like Clear Lake) is a good one.

One advantage that CD didn't point out about multihulls, is the fact that during a hurricane, you have a lot more places you can put the boat due to the shallow draft. I know several cat owners who have gone up small creeks and effectively hidden from the hurricane in the smaller creek, which wasn't a possibility for deeper draft boats.

Another big advantage of the multihull is you're not spending vast amounts of time at a tilt... The angle of heel on a multihull, even under sail, is generally less than 10˚. That means you can put your drink down on a table, and ten minutes later, it will still be where you left it. This is especially important as one gets older, since it means you're less likely to slip and fall and get injured.

If you have questions about multihulls, let me know... If you're interested in them at all, you will probably want to get Chris White's The Cruising Multihull and Thomas Firth Jones's Multihull Voyaging. White's book is an excellent overview of the pros and cons of a multihull boat, and goes a bit more in-depth into the construction and design of the boat, as Chris is a boat designer. Both books are a bit dated at this point, being written about twenty years ago.

Also, a lot of the charter companies have gone to having catamarans in their fleets as they are very good boats for cruising the islands.
 
  • Like
Reactions: livy

·
Registered
Joined
·
995 Posts
SD,

Thank you. In addition to your comments, a cat is faster, can be beached, more comfortable, etc, etc... but until the marinas come around, it will be a headache. I like cat's - I really do. Their positives are many and the drawbacks are few. Unfortunately, the few drawbacks are big ones.

- CD
 

·
Telstar 28
Joined
·
993 Posts
That's one reason I often recommend the smaller cats... they're able to fit in current marina slips... the bigger ones aren't. :D Folding tris don't have that problem... but have a lot less usable interior space...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
In SW FL, check out Burnt Store Marina in Ft. Myers. i don't know how clear the approach is. However, I think they have a limited number of l/a slips.

If I was going to do it, I would base myself north of Homosassa, even as far as Crystal River or even Apalachicola. Then in the Winter you could cruise south to the warmer waters, but not have to pay as much of the price.

Good Luck and Fair Winds,

TrT
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Another suggestion for South Florida is Key West. I lived on the city operated Mooring field for quite some time 3 years ago. The moorings are cheap ($120/mo. in 2003), the pump out boat comes once a week, they have a beautiful dingy dock, water for your tanks, garbage removal, shower facilities if you need them ...even parking for your car..yes...even parking. Get their before winter sets in as they always fill up when the wind pipes up.

Or you can cheaply hire a local to drop in a mooring and fight out the parking and dingy space at the local docks. Waste removal will be your issue in that case. It's a beautiful, small town place with wonderful, laid back people who really know their boats. There really is no place quite like it.

As for the boat...it really doesn't matter what you have... the boat has very little to do with the lifestyle you choose. More important to get a boat that will not break the budget and that you feel a connection to, because all boats are comprimises of one sort or another. Good Luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
A few more marinas that allow live aboards:
-St Augustine Municipal Marina and two other marinas on A1 (can't remember the names)
-Titusville Municipal Marina
-Regatta Point (Palmetto - on the west coast)

There are a lot of small marinas on the east coast that have liveaboards, but the bath/shower facilities are usually not good. These marinas do not advertise. The best way to find them is to travel the ICW then stop and ask when you see one.

Remember, with a cat, you will be paying for two slips!!!!!

Roger
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
The biggest problem now in Cetral Florida is finding a slip for a 40 to 45 ft boat with ocean access. All the marinas around Port Canaveral have long waiting lists and with the Condo slip craze its just going to get worse. You can go down near the place the Banana river enters the Indian River and pay more than $800 a month plus liveaboard fees. Florida just keeps getting worse. I have lived on the hook for most of the last 4 years. Florida has a bad case of not in my back yard. So many angry people. Its MIne mine mine. If it wasnt for the winters I would have left here years ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
we have a 46' sailboat that we keep in a marina in North Palm Beach, Florida. The slip cost is around $900 a month plus electric. There is a yacht club, it is in a gated condo complex right on the intercoastal. one bridge to the palm beach inlet. Very quiet marina - allows dogs and has full facilities. For retirement it is a great place as all the surrounding condo's are retired people. As a side note we also keep our 23' seacraft and that is $150 per month.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
Don't know if your interested In northwest florida at all but my marina allows live aboards. they charge 10.00 a foot 30 foot minnimum and 100.00 for power. Its not a luxury place with pools and such but its nice. and has a yard with a 25 ton lift. things are gennerally quite a bit cheeper than south florida and we have better beaches this is changing fast though.

PS we don't have snook just red and black drum and specks:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
I just priced and found live aboard marinas on the west coast of Florida.
Here is the poop. All prices are per month. You do the math.

Twin Dolphin Marina in Bradenton had two as of 5/23/07.

A 35 foot and a 40 foot:

$14 a foot
$30 dock fee
$30 electric
$200 live aboard fee
Plus tax
This marina lets you go month to month.

Pasadena Marina near Saint Petersburg had one.

40 foot:

$540
$170 live aboard fee
Plus metered electric and tax

And Burnt Store Marina near Fort Myers had a few.

$15 a foot
$200 live aboard fee
Plus metered electric
Plus tax
They charge less for a yearly contract ($11 a foot) the others didn't.

I found these as I thought the Beneteau 373 was a done deal.

Hope this helps,


CatalinaFan
 
1 - 20 of 77 Posts
Top