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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All,

So, Id like to live aboard a 30ft-ish sailboat but the problem is i've never sailed a day in my life. I Grew up on a houseboat and have boated most of my life but for whatever reason never found myself in a sailboat. Anyway, I'd like to start out small, I'm currently looking at a 1973 Catalina Capri 22. I don't see anyway I could live on it but I do see the value in learning to actually sail and learning to maintain a sailboat.

I think it be a lot more manageable to learn sailing and such on a smaller scale but i'm also missing out on the biggest reason why i'm doing it...to live on the damn thing!

Youre thoughts
 

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Captain Obvious
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2,362 Posts
If its a 1973, I think its a Mark 1 . I have one of those. No way to live on it. I have taken a nap on mine but I was pretty much blotto.


But, no living on it. It would be like living in a van.
 

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Chastened
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Just to make sure I understand you-

You're looking to live on a 30 foot boat, AND you do actually want to sail it.
You're not looking to buy a boat and squat on it until it sinks?

I lived aboard my Pearson 30 for awhile. Perfectly do-able, and even enjoyable.
I learned to sail on a Coronado 25 before I bought the Pearson.

You can buy your 30 footer and live aboard while learning to sail on smaller boats. Make friends, walk the docks. People will take you out and teach you.
When you're ready, take your 30 foot liveaboard boat out for a sail with an experienced sailor for "big boat" lessons.

30 feet isn't the Nimitz aircraft carrier. You don't need to buy a fleet of smaller craft to work your way up to 30 feet. Just borrow or rent them.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Just to make sure I understand you-

You're looking to live on a 30 foot boat, AND you do actually want to sail it.
You're not looking to buy a boat and squat on it until it sinks?

I dont see the point in having a boat If you're not going to sail it. Thats just my opinion on that. So yes, It will be sailed frequently weather permitted of course.

I lived aboard my Pearson 30 for awhile. Perfectly do-able, and even enjoyable.
I learned to sail on a Coronado 25 before I bought the Pearson.

You can buy your 30 footer and live aboard while learning to sail on smaller boats. Make friends, walk the docks. People will take you out and teach you.
When you're ready, take your 30 foot liveaboard boat out for a sail with an experienced sailor for "big boat" lessons.

30 feet isn't the Nimitz aircraft carrier. You don't need to buy a fleet of smaller craft to work your way up to 30 feet. Just borrow or rent them.

I assumed that it be a lot easier to move around a marina in something a lot smaller.
Didnt think about living on it then sailing smaller..Makes sense
 

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██▓▓▒▒░&
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Coupla problems with dreams. Except when they come true.(G)

You need to find out if you like sailing. It can be cold, wet, slow, boring. Or, a nice methodical way to enjoy peace and quiet. One season owning any boat ought to let you now which camp you'll fall into, golfers or sailors.

Do bear in mind that an old used boat is something like an old used car: If it is breaking down all the time, you may get the wrong impression of cars and driving, so try not to buy a moneypit.

Second thing to decide if whether you'll like living in a camper that is constantly in motion, constantly fighting the elements, and often without heat or air conditioning in a damp exposed location. Coupla overnights and weekends on the boat will give you some feel for that.

On the bright side, you never have to wait for the cable guy (no cable tv) never have to pay for plumbers on overtime rates (they don't make boat calls) and you'll never need to try finding a good housekeeper or lawn guy, they don't do boats either. (G)

Plunge in, with a 22 you can't be hurt too badly, call it a "dream education fund". DO find and take some sailing classes though, because there's an awful lot you just can't get right from books and videos, and those classes will bring you up the learning curve a lot faster, with a lot less pain, while introducing you to other new sailors, who'd be delighted to join you for a three hour cruise. So to speak.(G)
 

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That Drunk Guy
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Sounds like a great plan to me. I bought an Aquarius 21 sailed it for two summers, bought a Tanzer 27 and moved aboard. Lived on that for 3 years and now live aboard my HR 31. I absolutely love it. Starting small and moving up is a good idea.
 

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I have a 77 Catalina 22 and love it. I've soloed many times. My plan is to move up in size every few years then move aboard in 7-10 years or so. Get on it!
 

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I bought a 36' last December and moved onto it last July - I'd never set foot on a sailboat before.

Don't regret a thing, and wish I'd done it sooner. I practiced docking a bit before the nasty weather set in and am longing for the spring/summer and being able to get out of the marina and go places!

Also, you find out REAL fast if you are 'handy' (and if you are not, then you learn extremely quickly)
 

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Full-time Liveaboard
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Didnt think about living on it then sailing smaller..Makes sense
In reality, there isn't that much difference handling a 22 foot and a 30 foot boat. It is more dependent on how the boat itself handles and you'll get used to either one relatively quickly. I know of a top rated sailing school that teaches basic keelboat skills on a 26 footer. Clearly, it is different than a 14 foot sunfish or Hobie 16.

Layouts of these boats can be very different, as well, so I would look at several in that size range and see which feels right to you and is the type of boat for the sailing area you'll be in most of the time.
 

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bell ringer
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sailing isn't hard and never having sailed isn't any reason not to live on a 30' sailboat
 

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If you've decided you want to live aboard a thirty foot sailboat, then do it. There's no reason to screw around with a twenty-two if you want a thirty.

No one can say if you're going to like living on it. Or owning it. But if you've decided it's what you want to do, and you're up for the obvious inconveniences, there's no reason why you shouldn't do it.

Starting with a thirty is only foolhardy if you're a fool. If you're not a fool, that means you'll educate yourself as you go along and do reasonable things, and be just fine.

Do it.
 

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My experience over the past 8 years is the bigger they are, the more forgiving they tend to be while sailing.

Good luck on whatever you decide upon,

Gary :cool:
 

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My first boat was a 38 foot. No regrets.
 

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Old Guy
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An old 22 footer is a great way to "get wet" and figure out if you actually like sailing, but as you say, it won't tell you a darn thing about what living aboard is like. IMHO living aboard anything smaller than the low 30's is tough duty, and much like camping. Will you be working? Do you hope to at some point find a true love who wants to spend extended time aboard with you? Will you be in a year round sailing environment or have to brave snow & ice in the winter? Do you like/are you good at fixing and maintaining electrical, plumbing and mechanical stuff? Older "affordable" boats usually need a lot of care and feeding.
 
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