SailNet Community banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,130 Posts
If you are staying in one place, I wouldn't think it would be any different that finding work as an electrician living ashore. These days, I suspect its tougher than pre-recession.

If you intend to cruise and pick up jobs along the way, that's probably tougher. In the US there are licensing rules that vary greatly by state and county. If you are here and are licensed, I'm sure you already know that. Working in foreign countries is even more complicated, regardless of your trade.

It's not a bad skill to have if you get the chance to work for a fellow cruiser in some remote anchorage in the world. Not as likely to be required as diesel or refrigeration, but anyone that can assist a stranded cruiser is valuable. However, you're likely to be paid in beer and food.
 

·
Dirt Free
Joined
·
3,043 Posts
I think a real marine electrician (quite rare) with a good understanding of electricity/water and electrolytic corrosion could make a buck just about anywhere. A boat without electrical issues is uncommon. It does not take long for word to spread if you are good at what you do, reliable and honest.
 
  • Like
Reactions: copacabana

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,130 Posts
Ah, marine electrician (radio, plotters, etc, as opposed to power). If that's the case, I agree with boatpoker. However, again it will depend on whether you are staying in one location to create a reputation.

If cruising, there is one other trouble with marine electrical work. I find better than half the time, the electrician simply diagnoses what needs to be replaced. You would have to have access to getting replacement parts wherever you are.
 
  • Like
Reactions: davidpm

·
Registered
Joined
·
545 Posts
The replacement parts will cost more than replacement most of the time. The test equipment required to trouble shoot digital systems is EXPENSIVE, and doesn't move easily. Complex systems require complex solutions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,552 Posts
Does any one have experience living aboard and working as an electrician? Any trouble finding work?
In this economy, it is tough to find well paying electrical jobs living in one place on land. While transient, liveaboard it may be nigh impossible, especially when you factor in local regs/license requirements and such.

I have a State of VA journeyman's license and class A home improvement, which both required taking a pretty decent written test, as well as CE courses and updates yearly, and it was tough to get more than $13-15 an hour and maybe 30 hours a week, there.

Moved to TN last year, and my VA journeyman card means nothing here, no reciprocity, no exam credit....would have to study and pass the TN test to get journeyman card. Hourly rate here is less than VA, if you can find work.

Marine Electrician with some certs or verifiable experience, you can usually get project based or seasonal jobs as you travel.

All the best no matter what you decide.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top