SailNet Community banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Wish I never found SN!
Joined
·
2,116 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Thought this might interest a few here. I met Cameron Slagle the owner skipper of yacht Timella in Rarotonga. He had been on the hard doing repairs before continuing his circumnavigation. This appears to be the end of that adventure.

log of the rescue
 
  • Like
Reactions: Cruisingdad

·
Telstar 28
Joined
·
1,000 Posts
Good read. I am a bit curious as to how Timella ended up on a charted, at least from the post I read, reef???
 

·
Wish I never found SN!
Joined
·
2,116 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I agree Cam, just shows how alone you can be out there in the central Pacific. There were so many incidences about rescues/assistance of cruisers by cruisers from all over. When I was in the Marqueasas, a catamaran with no steering was towed in by a number of other boats taking it in shifts for more than 200 miles, during the night when towing became too dangerous they sat of the stricken Cat and resumed towing at first light.
 

·
Wish I never found SN!
Joined
·
2,116 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Good read. I am a bit curious as to how Timella ended up on a charted, at least from the post I read, reef???
I believe from what I have read from other reports, they may have lost the engine, (I dont know this for a fact) but there was mention elsewhere that Cameron had sustained 2nd degree burns from and earlier attempt at repairing the engine. I hear he is back home in Brisbane Australia so I will be trying to get in contact with him, he’s not adverse to a chat or excuse for a drink.
 

·
Telstar 28
Joined
·
1,000 Posts
Keep us posted Simon. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,297 Posts
Good read. I am a bit curious as to how Timella ended up on a charted, at least from the post I read, reef???
Dog,

**it happens! Captain's been injured (burns), crews tired (days at sea, middle of the night), charts possibly in error, etc.... All kinds of reasons. It's a big bad ocean out there.
-----

Simon,

Thanks, it's a great story. I'm going to save it and include it in my required reading for crew. It sounds as if everyone performed admirably -- really cool heads all around.

The point above on being alone out there is spot on. In most places in the world there is no one to come get you but your fellow cruisers. If you wander far from the US or European coasts you really have to be prepared to help yourself, and those you encounter along the way.

I think the story shows how critical it is to have multiple means of communications and as much redundancy as you can afford. The crew in the water would have really benefited from a waterproof, hand-held VHF. It seems from the narrative that it would have been very easy for them to have gone unseen.

Nice to see a rescue story where everyone lives to sail another day. Well done, crew of Ocealys.
 

·
Owner, Green Bay Packers
Joined
·
1,000 Posts
Thanks for relaying that story, Simon.

One thing that struck me right away was how fortunate that they'd had their VHF radio switched on. Channel 16 is the distress and hailing frequency but most cruisers, based on events related, could benefit from selecting another channel to monitor while in port. Most radios will do this. That would leave 16 clear for more important traffic. It's quite common for ships and fishermen to monitor a channel distinct from 16 in such situations with the channel to be used agreed upon before hand or known from prior practice. If that traffic is an irritant it can be shut off without having to stop monitoring 16.

I had a similar experience while moored in Guam with a small fishing boat adrift off the spit. His radio was so weak that we were the only vessel to pick up his distress call on 16, from 1/2 mile away. He was indeed in dire straits, about to lose a tenuous grip with his anchor on the rip-rap in 12 foot seas merely 100 yards off the spit. We liaised with the CG on Guam, who could not hear his radio transmissions at all, and jointly decided to quit talking a get our RHIB in the water. It was a short jaunt, especially since we had no visual idea of how close he actually was to us hidden behind the spit. We were glad we'd not dawdled when we saw a pretty marginal anchor rode basically tending up and down! The rest was uneventful but I think it didn't hurt at all that we had a heaving line on board. I doubt most sailors carry one. It's something to consider.

The most important factor in the whole thing though was that we had a mate on watch, on the bridge of the ship, with the VHF on. Had our practice been, unconscionably, to not have an anchor watch, even on a very secure mooring, the call would have gone unanswered to who knows what effect. Boats in distress are always likely to be low on battery power; goes with the condition.

Ironically, the Pacific Daily News monitored the whole conversation on the VHF and responded almost as quickly as we did by getting a photographer out on to the end of the spit and we made the front page of next mornings paper. A perfect photo of a young Third Mate throwing a heaving line to the stricken fishing boat. Kid had excellent technique even if he did graduate from Mass. Maritime! (g)
 

·
Wish I never found SN!
Joined
·
2,116 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I found this report, it was engine failure.


"After losing his home of nine years, the Australian captain of the ill-fated Timella will spend his weekend shopping for a new yacht, determined to start again.
Speaking to the Otago Daily Times from Brisbane last night, Cameron Slagle spoke of how a mixture of poor weather and mistakes resulted in his 10m yacht hitting rocks off the coast of Fiji, with a Southland woman among those rescued.

The crew had been battling high winds and heavy seas on Sunday and attempts to steer the yacht into port failed after the engine overheated and water burst from the radiator, burning Mr Slagle's face and leg.

The yacht sank about midnight.

He and crew members Elizabeth Schoch, of Australia, and Ali Timms, of Lumsden, took to the boat's dinghy, but it was destroyed by the overturning yacht's mast.

All three were in the water for six hours before being rescued by American sailor Maurice Conti.

Mr Slagle said all three were suffering from hypothermia, but Ms Timms was the worst - she believed she had less than an hour to live when they were rescued.

He was full of praise for New Zealand search and rescue staff and the New Zealand High Commission in Suva for the role they played in the rescue.

"I take my hat off to them. They did an excellent job."

Mr Slagle said he was "back to square one", living with his mother and wearing what he described as ill-fitting clothes.

"That boat was my whole world . . . losing everything is devastating."

He said Ms Timms had experienced "an action-packed holiday" which he speculated was probably more exciting than anything happening in the South Island."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,507 Posts
Very well done and what a terrific log. Great story and brave crews.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top