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Any Pacific Seacraft 34 owners out there complete a major passage; i.e., crossing the Atlantic or Pacific Oceans? I know the boat is capable of doing so safely, but from what I have read it seems like most major passages are made on boats > 40 ft.
 

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Joshua Slocum's Spray was 36-foot-9-inches long.
About 14 sub-40 footers are presently racing around the world single-handed, nonstop. Check out the Mini Transat 6.50 if you want to see even smaller boats crossing the Atlantic.
You don't need a 40 plus footer to cross oceans any more than you need a huge SUV to commute to work. In both cases, it is the person making the decisions that will make or break any trip.
The size of the boat, however, directly affects the comfort of those aboard. Some of us prefer the home-like comforts of a larger boat and others are perfectly happy to camp out, living in a cramped, tiny space.
 

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Try Googling "Voyage of the Swan" and read about Dave and Rhonda Mancini's voyages in their PSC 34. Dave provided an amazing amount of information about his PSC 34 and his cruising. You can also search this site for his entries.
 

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:cut_out_animated_em forgive my ignorance,, but what do they do when storms come round try to out sail them? I'd think that would be a helluva bumpy ride in a small boat...
 

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Throw a Jordan series drogue off the stern, button up, take a sturgeron and go to sleep on the saloon sole just like you would on a bigger boat.
Unless you’re on a Rapido 60 this business of outrunning storms is fantasy. You can preposition to miss a cyclonic depression with sufficient forewarning on occasion but think any boat going to sea should be able to handle a gale with storm sails and a storm with drogue or sea anchor
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Try Googling "Voyage of the Swan" and read about Dave and Rhonda Mancini's voyages in their PSC 34. Dave provided an amazing amount of information about his PSC 34 and his cruising. You can also search this site for his entries.
I will definitely check that out - thanks!
 

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When we were out doing French Polynesia in the '70s, most boats were under 40', many well under. One French Couple had sailed from home in a converted Life Boat that wasn't much more than 20' if that. Grant, who probably is on the list, cruised with his wife on a 26' boat, we were on a 32', many others in boats in the mid 30's. The single humongous boat was a 44' that had the novelty of novelties, a washer dryer combo. Their gear was good for a lot of conversation among us cruisers on why you'd want, let alone install, a W/D on a boat. The idea of cruising on a boat bigger than 40' was largely a foreign concept. Of course most of us were in our late 20's, 30's and sailed what we could afford.

Since GPS has ruined cruising, anyone with enough money to buy a condo can buy a floating one and point it somewhere. One upmanship seems to have taken over with half century catamarans that have more heads than crew aren't at all unusual. It's not that you need all that boat but that they can afford it.

A boat with the reputation of the PSC should be stout enough even for sailing the Capes. Wouldn't hesitate a moment in taking one that was reasonably prepared almost anywhere.
 

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Joshua Slocum's Spray was 36-foot-9-inches long.
The standards have changed since 1895.:grin

Tons of much smaller boats have done these types of crossings.

The question is do you have the skills to make this type of crossing and is the boat well founded for it. Pacific Seacraft are well made boats but if you have 30 year old rigging it might not survive a crossing if you hit rough weather.
 

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:cut_out_animated_em forgive my ignorance,, but what do they do when storms come round try to out sail them? I'd think that would be a helluva bumpy ride in a small boat...
The theory is the bigger a boat the better it can handle heavy weather. Which would be more comfortable in a storm, a 45 footer racer/cruiser or a full keeled double ender like the PSC34?
 

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The standards have changed since 1895.:grin
But have they really? Aren't most of us sailing the boats we can afford? I've not seen a lot of 1%ers sailing PSC 34's or poor folks sailing 66' Oysters.
Joshua Slocum probably couldn't have afforded a bigger boat, and as it was if memory serves, he rebuilt it stem to stern. Not only he was the first solo circumnavigator, he probably did it on the first project boat, too. lol.
 

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But have they really?
Things are the same financially now as then, you sail what you can afford.

I think a guy rich enough could solo a well founded 60 footer nowadays. Plenty of guys on here soloing 40 footers and up. I don't know even if cost were no object would a solo sailor choose a larger boat back then?
 

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The size of the boat, however, directly affects the comfort of those aboard. Some of us prefer the home-like comforts of a larger boat and others are perfectly happy to camp out, living in a cramped, tiny space.
The size of the boat does directly effect the cost of cruising and maintaining. However, with all due respect to Capta, there is no such direct relation to comfort, at least when it comes to the motion of the vessel (to be fair, it sounds like Capta was talking more about other creature comforts like hot showers, less cramped quarters, etc...). A 40 foot Beneteau is probably going to be a good deal less comfortable than a Crealock 34.

Out of curiosity, Kbbarton, don't you own a Crealock 34?
 

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A Pacific Seacraft 34 is a fine ocean going boat. Some people prefer a larger boat, some a smaller. Some prefer the motion of a traditional vessel, some like the more modern designs. I believe that there is no such thing as comfortable ride in a small boat in a storm. Like everything else, it's a trade-off.

What is of more concern is the basic seaworthiness, the condition of the boat, and the proficiency of the crew. Seaworthyness has been debated at length on this and other forums. Different issues come to play, but the basic idea is that many boats are seaworthy, but some are obviously designed for non ocean use. That dosen't take into account, which ocean. Are we talking trans Pacific, or Southern Ocean? Antarctica or the Carribean. All of that matters. Leaving that debate for a while, look at the condition of the boat.

When was the standing rigging replaced? How are the ... well the list goes on, as you can fill in for yourself. One area specific to the PS 34 is the condition of the chainplates. On every boat preparing for ocean use, the skipper is responsible for a huge amount of inspection and preparation. The longer the voyage, the more detailed the preparation.

The crew is crucial. People point to Sloucum as an inspiration. I read a recent biography, sorry, I've forgotten the author, that recounted the depth of experience that he had on sailing vessels. How you sail the boat, how you react to situations (and emergencies) and how you know what needs to be done - and how to do it- make a huge difference in the safety and enjoyment of your passages.

A well found PS 34, with a good crew. Hell yes, it would make a fine passage maker. So would a lot of other boats. There is one thing that I've neglected to discuss: Fate.

Fate, luck, God's will ... whatever you call it. My friend calls it the Goddess of Chance. Sometimes things just work out. Sometimes they don't. Since a well found boat with a good crew are the best we can do, we pay our money and take our chances. Luck favors the prepaired mind is an old saying, true in life, and true in sailing.
 

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I love it when folks talk about outrunning a storm. Keep mind that most storms move a whole lot faster than any production sailboat I know of. And, for those that sincerely believe they can outrun a storm, maybe you should read Lin and Larry Pardey's Storm Tactics Handbook. https://www.landfallnavigation.com/storm-tactics-handbook-2501.html

Almost forgot, one of my You Tube heroes is a Brit sailing White Shadow, a 33-foot steel sloop that has crossed the Atlantic, passed through the Panama Canal and is now sailing in the Pacific. He took a short break to visit his home in England, and will soon be returning to Panama to resume his voyage. He's about 10 years younger than myself, I believe, around 66 years of age.


Good Luck from an old single handed sailor,

Gary :cool:
 

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The size of the boat does directly effect the cost of cruising and maintaining. However, with all due respect to Capta, there is no such direct relation to comfort, at least when it comes to the motion of the vessel (to
You are trying to tell folks that there would be no difference in the comfort and motion aboard between a PSC 34 and an Amel Super Maramu in a gale beating to weather, or even running in the Trade Winds? You want us to believe that in trough a short mast like the PSC 34 will still hold the wind just like the bigger boat, in the same heavy weather conditions?
Basically, I was talking about creature comforts, not the motion of the boat and her ability to move through the seas, but that was because that is a given, not needing much discussion.
You are welcome to your opinion, but I'd really like to understand how you came to that conclusion.
 

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You are trying to tell folks that there would be no difference in the comfort and motion aboard between a PSC 34 and an Amel Super Maramu in a gale beating to weather, or even running in the Trade Winds? You want us to believe that in trough a short mast like the PSC 34 will still hold the wind just like the bigger boat, in the same heavy weather conditions?
Basically, I was talking about creature comforts, not the motion of the boat and her ability to move through the seas, but that was because that is a given, not needing much discussion.
You are welcome to your opinion, but I'd really like to understand how you came to that conclusion.
I'm not sure why you choose to ignore my example and then compare a 34 footer to a 55 footer. Since both are designed for blue water, of course size is going to make the Amel more comfortable. My point is that not all boats are designed for blue water. So, if you simply compare based solely on size, it is not a direct relation between size and sea comfort.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The size of the boat does directly effect the cost of cruising and maintaining. However, with all due respect to Capta, there is no such direct relation to comfort, at least when it comes to the motion of the vessel (to be fair, it sounds like Capta was talking more about other creature comforts like hot showers, less cramped quarters, etc...). A 40 foot Beneteau is probably going to be a good deal less comfortable than a Crealock 34.

Out of curiosity, Kbbarton, don't you own a Crealock 34?
I do indeed. I've been watching various cruising-related YouTube channels and they mostly involve bigger boats (funny that Capta mentioned a Amel Super Marimu - that boat features prominently in one them, though it seems to have at least four people on board most of the time). I was just thinking that the Crealock 34, for a dedicated blue-water cruiser, has a relatively tiny fuel tank and two relatively small water tanks which I would think would limit the boat's endurance. Of course, I recognize that on a passage one would actively conserving fuel, power, and stores.

Maybe I was just musing my way to a PS 40. :)
 

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75 gallons of water and 38 gallons of fuel is not small. Smaller boat, smaller diesel, lower fuel fuel consumption. The engine stated in Sailboat Data is 38hp which is way overpowered to my thinking. Have a 27hp Yanmar in my same size boat and it's more than adequate. Hopefully lower rpm will equate to lower fuel consumption even with too big engine.

We had identical water capacity in two tanks. Caught water from the awning and never had to switch to 2nd between rainfalls filling the tanks back up in French Polynesia. Yes you can be profligate with water but disconnecting the pressure water pump and only using foot pumps is an instant no pain conservation technique. If you can't get by on the fuel and water capacity of a PSC 34 you really should consider a floating condo permanently attached to a dock with water and electric.
 

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I do indeed. I've been watching various cruising-related YouTube channels and they mostly involve bigger boats (funny that Capta mentioned a Amel Super Marimu - that boat features prominently in one them, though it seems to have at least four people on board most of the time). I was just thinking that the Crealock 34, for a dedicated blue-water cruiser, has a relatively tiny fuel tank and two relatively small water tanks which I would think would limit the boat's endurance. Of course, I recognize that on a passage one would actively conserving fuel, power, and stores.

Maybe I was just musing my way to a PS 40. :)
Those PS 40s are very nice. However, for me, I made a conscious decision to go with the 34. I'm in my early 60s, don't have any kids, and my wife is not into sailing, very little other family (and they're not sailors either). So, I'm either single-handing or I have to depend on finding crew. With the PSC34 I can easily handle the sails, the boom, do all the repairs and upgrades, on my own (of course, when we lived out in the southwest, I use to go backpacking in the wilderness either just with my GSDs or with one or two other friends, so I like smaller groups during my ventures).

As for fuel and water, I'm either going to carry extra on deck/in the cabin, or in the case of water, maybe install a water maker behind one of the salon berths.

There are a number of YouTube videos that feature smaller (under 40) sailboats of varying capabilities. For example Sailing Vessel Prism. I guess that there is a bias toward the bigger boats because their videos can include more characters (especially of the female persuasion).

Best of luck with your PSC34. I'm planning my first multi-week trip around the Great Lakes for next summer, really looking forward to the adventure.
 

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The theory is the bigger a boat the better it can handle heavy weather. Which would be more comfortable in a storm, a 45 footer racer/cruiser or a full keeled double ender like the PSC34?
The PSC34 does not have a full keel. It has a fin keel.

I know of quite a few that have recently sailed from North America to the South Pacific (or Hawaii).

Swan, as mentioned above was sailed to the South Pacific, sold, and then sailed across the Pacific again by the new owner. Several have done the single-handed Transpac.

Several PSC37's have also crossed the Pacific recently (PSC34 and 37 are extremely similar). One example is s/v Luckness. Luckness's blog gives you a good idea of what it is like. s/v Luckness.

Also Cool Change, a PSC31 recently sailed to the South Pacific.
 
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