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Jim A.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In have had a piece of flexible foil/honeycomb like insulation, less than 1" thick, to use inside the icebox on my P-30 over the ice and food to help preserve the ice. Over the years it has deteriorated significantly. I have been unable to locate a similar piece of insulation. Any Suggestions ? Would bubble wrap do anything to help with the insulation ?
 

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Wandering Aimlessly
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You using loose ice, or some kind of block? When I was a weekender, I would put a couple of plastic quart milk jugs of water in the freezer on Monday so they would be frozen solid by Friday night when I headed to the boat. They would last twice as long as loose ice, plus, my cooler wasn't full of water. Take 'em home, and put 'em back in the freezer.
 

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If you're talking about the insulation that looks sort of like bubble wrap with foil on both sides, it's called Reflectix and it is sold at big box home improvement stores.
 

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Anyone try to refrigerate their icebox?
People do it all the time and there are numerous kits available for conversion to 12 volt refrigeration. Engle or Dometic refrigerated coolers are also very popular, have extremely low energy consumption, and take a lot of the hassle out of the whole thing.

If you decide to convert your ice box you will want to make sure you have at least 3-4" of foam insulation on all 6 sides of the box and a tight fitting lid with a gasket. Not having this much insulation will make the refrigeration system a huge energy hog and create condensation issues. A lot of people find that properly insulating the box extends the ice life to the point they're happy without refrigeration. If you do add refrigeration, it may be wise to reduce the size of the box to around 3 cubic feet. A lot of the boxes designed around ice blocks were 5 or 6 cubic feet or more and if you don't need the space it is a huge energy waster leading you to a larger compressor and more battery capacity. Even for a modest system, you'll want 100 amp hours absolute minimum house bank size and preferably double that or more if you intend to stay on the hook.
 
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