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Discussion Starter #1
So I've narrowed down my "future boat" (this spring or next fall purchase) to 3 makers and models. One of which is the C&C 35 MKII. I really like alot about this boat, and in my area you get alot of boat for the price.

"Wet decks" I see come up alot, but it seems to me almost any boat over 30yrs old that isn't "boat show restored" will most likely have them to some degree. I'm shopping freshwater only boats so that reduces the biological life that will be eating the balsa, but I'm also dealing with freeze\thaw cycles, so maybe it's a trade off. My current boat has some wet core in it (plywood, the worst to get wet as far as I know) but it's far from about to fall apart. I assume most "wet decks" are ok to live with unless you see serious flexing\cracking around load points like cleats\winches etc?

I see alot about the floor\stringers and keel bolts. Is this an actual issue on these boats or are people just talking in general about bolt on keels? I assume most of the floor bits can be inspected easily through the bilge and sole hatches? Anything I should look for? I've read to watch for iron washers and replace w\SS if found. Has anyone snapped a bolt\stud off while re-torquing them? That's always my biggest worry when "torquing" anything (yes using a proper torque wrench).

Here's my biggest set back so far: rod rigging. I heard alot of the 35's came with rod? Any truth to this? I hate rod rigging. The boats I've found with it are ORIGINAL (40+yrs old!) and it's expensive and difficult to find a rigger who does rod. In fact in my area there is NO ONE who can replace rod. Unless I found a boat that had a receipt showing the rod was new I would avoid buying one just because I can't change out the standing rigging on a rod rigged boat myself.

So, anything else I should look for? I'm upgrading from my T7.5 because we need a bigger boat for family\friends to come out with us, to be more sturdy in a blow, and one day to look at an ICW trip and Caribbean trip.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I advise you to post your question at the dedicated C&C forum: C&C Yachts - C&C Photo Album & Resource Center

That said, you could hardly go wrong with a 35 MkII, so long as you inspect for the usual issues. For 35 MkII-specific issues, the C&C forum can help you.
Thanks, I know of that site but find it very hard to navigate. I don't see a "forum" button on it, but there's an email distribution list if that's what you meant? I also wasn't sure the etiquette of registering on an owners site when I'm not (and may not end up being) an owner.

That's kind of why I was asking here, there always seems to be a flow of great experience here that's easy to access.
 

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No problem. :) I'm pretty sure the email distro is the way to go about it. I'm also sure that they don't mind prospective owners asking questions.

I'm no C&C expert but I did race on a 35 Mk III for several years.

- I think when mentioning keel bolts, that this is a general item to inspect, not a specific weakness of the C&C 35. I wouldn't worry about re-torquing unless the keel shows signs of wobble or separation at the joint.
- Rod rigging- The Mk III had rod for certain but I'm unsure if the Mk II's came rod-rigged. However, you can change to wire, you just need to select a wire that is spec'd to carry the same load that the rod carried. The wire is typically larger in diameter, but I cannot be more specific than that. Yes, rod is expensive but it has a longer service life. It may be a simple matter of re-heading the rod. A rigger will tell you if the rod cannot be re-headed. If it can't, then you need to think about replacing everything.
- Wet core- All you can do, is try to find the best maintained specimen that you can afford. Make damned sure that the hull core is dry. The deck core can be dealt with.

You already know that a freshwater boat will probably have fewer issues, assuming that it was conscientiously maintained. You seem to have a good handle on the situation, I wouldn't worry.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
No problem. :) I'm pretty sure the email distro is the way to go about it. I'm also sure that they don't mind prospective owners asking questions.

I'm no C&C expert but I did race on a 35 Mk III for several years.

- I think when mentioning keel bolts, that this is a general item to inspect, not a specific weakness of the C&C 35. I wouldn't worry about re-torquing unless the keel shows signs of wobble or separation at the joint.
- Rod rigging- The Mk III had rod for certain but I'm unsure if the Mk II's came rod-rigged. However, you can change to wire, you just need to select a wire that is spec'd to carry the same load that the rod carried. The wire is typically larger in diameter, but I cannot be more specific than that. Yes, rod is expensive but it has a longer service life. It may be a simple matter of re-heading the rod. A rigger will tell you if the rod cannot be re-headed. If it can't, then you need to think about replacing everything.
- Wet core- All you can do, is try to find the best maintained specimen that you can afford. Make damned sure that the hull core is dry. The deck core can be dealt with.

You already know that a freshwater boat will probably have fewer issues, assuming that it was conscientiously maintained. You seem to have a good handle on the situation, I wouldn't worry.
Thanks for the input Ajax, much appreciated!
 

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It's always surprisingly difficult to be certain, but I believe the 35MKII still had a solid glass hull with cored deck. The slightly newer 29, 34 and 36 (along with early custom builds) were the beginning of cored hulls, if I've got it right.

I don't think the C&Cs in general had any significant floor/keel bolt issues and probably fewer than some other brands.

You can certainly get a lot of boat for the buck esp if you find a good one.

You said 'narrowed down to 3'... what others?
 
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Discussion Starter #7
It's always surprisingly difficult to be certain, but I believe the 35MKII still had a solid glass hull with cored deck. The slightly newer 29, 34 and 36 (along with early custom builds) were the beginning of cored hulls, if I've got it right.

I don't think the C&Cs in general had any significant floor/keel bolt issues and probably fewer than some other brands.

You can certainly get a lot of boat for the buck esp if you find a good one.

You said 'narrowed down to 3'... what others?
Thanks Faster, yes from what I've read the MKI and MKII's in the 35 were solid FRP hulls with balsa decks. In the 80's with the MKIII's and newer models I've heard cored at or slightly above the waterline for hulls.

I'm also looking at CS33's, and Aloha 34's currently. Not to say another boat model can't wander into my scope, but it needs to be affordable (the CS33's are the top end of the price scale currently), safe\well constructed, be a masthead sloop, solid glass hull, and preferebly no big "gotcha" expense items like rod rigging, saildrive, etc. Size range minimum 33' max 36'.
 

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One thought, I think CS 33s were diesel powered, C&C 35s came standard with an atomic 4. If you could find a C&C that's been repowered with diesel, that might be a nice selling feature.
 

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The CS boats are beautifully tooled, the one knock on (some) 33s is the lack of any sort of quarter berth - I think that changed during the production run. If overnight guests are not anticipated that may not be such a big deal. Very handsome boats and also very well regarded.

The Aloha 34 is probably the most 'liveable' of the three but (IMO) not as 'sexy' as the other two. However Ted Brewer is another skilled designer and the boat is probably very well behaved.

An early Mirage 33? They seem to sell for quite a bit less than the later '35' (same boat with a reverse transom). A slippery Perry design, very liveable layout if a bit 'frigidaire' below with a lot of gelcoat. Friends had one and they added a Teak and holly sole and some ceiling treatment for a much warmer vibe.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Arcb - you are exactly right, and in fact I'm in the process of talking to a broker who has a C&C 35 w\yanmar 30 in it. Unfortunately it doesn't state the rigging type, but in one picture I see what appears to be a manual "wheel style" backstay adjuster which makes me think it's rod rigged.

Faster- I actually had the mirage 33 on my list, I just stopped looking because they all seemed to fit in the CS33 price ranger or higher for some reason. Maybe supply\demand in my area, but I will keep looking! I really liked one Aloha 34 I saw come up last year, VERY affordable too, I just wasn't in a position to buy it and I "missed the boat" on it (you're welcome for that terrible pun on a Friday). I did see another one listed but it's at the 40k range and out of this guys price range.

I've been doing more and more googling and it seems like tons of C&C 35's came rod rigged. In fact if I just search "rod rigging conversion" or project I immediately run into some blogs with C&C's being worked on. It's not boding well if I wanted to avoid rod...
 

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Ya, the one with the Yanmar is a really clean looking boat. Too bad you didn't post this last week, I was down there with the inlaws for the holidays and would have been more than happy to go spend a couple of hours looking at a boat lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ya, the one with the Yanmar is a really clean looking boat. Too bad you didn't post this last week, I was down there with the inlaws for the holidays and would have been more than happy to go spend a couple of hours looking at a boat lol.
Lol I will keep that in mind! It does look nice, it's the old rod-rigging I think I smell on it that's making me hesitant. I just seem to be tripping over rod rigged boats so far. I guess I'm just in the "pocket" of old race boats is why I'm seeing it all over suddenly. Great Lakes builders, late 70's early 80's, 33-36ft, etc.
 

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I really wouldn't let the rod scare you away immediately. Hire a rigger to inspect it and tell you if it needs re-heading, and if it CAN be re-headed.

If the answer is Yes and No, run away.
If the answer is Yes and Yes, get it re-headed and enjoy another 15-20 years with the rod.
If the answer is No and Yes, you're even better off. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I assume that you are weighing the cost of possible upgrades to a nearby boat to the cost/time involved in purchasing a better but far off boat.
Every day of my life lol. The price differences Im seeing are 10-20k higher in these brackets. I can do alot of work bringing a less than perfect boat up to my needs with that kind of money. Other than keel replacement or changing rod rigging (lol beating a horse here) I can do almost all work myself. Tbh I'd rather a simpler boat and put items on that are updated and of my liking (radio, chart plotter, etc) than pay extra for the same but outdated items already existing on a boat.

Ajax I agree and am calling rod riggers in Toronto after new years (all closed now) to see the cost of inspection or reheading. I do like the thought of NEW rod rigging but if I can avoid it altogether I will.
 

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Owned Haleakula over 20 years.
I prefer the rod as it helps stiffen the boat. I re headed mine 8 years ago. You can replace with wire

The 35 are great boats. Fast, pointverywell, very precise steering, comfortable also . Haleakula is an MKIII k/c , Yanmar 3gm, no water intrusion,

Feel free to p m me
 
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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Ya, the one with the Yanmar is a really clean looking boat. Too bad you didn't post this last week, I was down there with the inlaws for the holidays and would have been more than happy to go spend a couple of hours looking at a boat lol.
Hey Arcb,

So I had a look at that boat...classic sailboat ad, the missing pictures (head, V, etc) are missing for a reason. The boat pictured was virtually not the boat I saw. The clean copper bottom in the pics was completely gone, steering busted, interior had random wires hanging from the cabin top all over (I assume fixtures that were removed?). The "new AC" system was laughable, just about every nook and cranny I opened had random 120v wires hanging loose either exposed or loosely capped with corrosion bleeding down the insulator layer.

It was...an old boat lol.

EDIT: The forstay was back-twisted too at the mast head when exiting the furler, the wires were opened up and spiralled enough it would need replacement as well.
 

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Every one of the MkII's that I've surveyed left the factory with house type wiring i.e. solid core copper wiring, single pole AC panels without polarity indicators, no GFI's, no galvanic isolator, no AC/DC bond, AC conductors marked as 300V instead of the required 600V. There are a few other things like running lights are below the sheer (not legal in Canada).

The MkII's with atomic 4's are another world .... Multiple issues of non-ignition protected electrical components in the engine compartment, improperly ventilation gasoline engine compartments, improper battery and battery charger installations
 

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Every one of the MkII's that I've surveyed left the factory with house type wiring i.e. solid core copper wiring, single pole AC panels without polarity indicators, no GFI's, no galvanic isolator, no AC/DC bond, AC conductors marked as 300V instead of the required 600V. There are a few other things like running lights are below the sheer (not legal in Canada).

The MkII's with atomic 4's are another world .... Multiple issues of non-ignition protected electrical components in the engine compartment, improperly ventilation gasoline engine compartments, improper battery and battery charger installations
Interesting. You say that. When I did the complete rewrite of Haleakula an 83 35 MKIII about 10 years ago I was shocked at the type of wire I found in her. House lamp cord up the mast and throughout the boat on the DC side. C
 
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