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Solon
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22 Posts
Hello Everyone my name is Solon and I'm looking to buy a used sailboat. I only want to buy once so I'm looking at buying a 36' 45'. I wanting to sail around the world, but its only a dream for now. I was in a very bad car wreck 2 years ago and didn't walk for a over year. But I'm all well now and just a small limp in the mornings, but at 46 years old I guess everyone does. From the wreck I was in I have the funds to buy a nice sailboat from the settlement. Im very new to sailing, but I was raise on motorboats and fishing boats so I do know for sure I love boating and love the blue water.
What I'm wanting to know is should I buy a boat that needs some fixing up or should I go for one ready to go. I can spent up $75,000.00 I would like a boat with room to have friends or will hold lots of extra things I will need for long trips. Also can one person sail a boat that size by their self? How much fuel can a 75hp used in a hour?
I would like some Ideas of what all I should look for in a sailboat. And what I will need take extra for a long trip I know I want a Automatic Identification System, water changer, GPS and Autopilot. Also how do you go about planning a 6 months to a year trip? How much money will I need. I was thinking for fuel and food maybe $500 to $1000 a month?? I will be very thankful for any help you may give..Please forgive my typing I'm a hunt a letter then peck a letter typer.....Thanks Solon
 

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Senior Member
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19,485 Posts
Welcome to the forum..

I'd suggest it's a bit early for some of your questions.. by all means shop for a boat but you're not going to accomplish all this in a very short time.

Browse the forums here - lots to learn here, both about boats, budgets, cruising costs, all of this is covered in existing threads, so there's not really a need to hash it all out again here.

I'm sure you're aware that you're 'biting off a big chunk' at this point, so no need to rush into it. Best of luck, glad to hear you've recovered from your ordeal OK.
 

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Senior Smart Aleck
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2,150 Posts
Start by reading Don Casey's "Complete Illustrated Sailboat Maintenance Manual", then buy a small weekender/keelboat with a tiller, like a Catalina 22 or J/24. After a few years of study, work and practice, you will know whether your current plans are appropriate and appealing to you.
 

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Asleep at the wheel
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3,016 Posts
I'll even go one step smaller than James's suggestion - go with a 14-18' dinghy. You can pick one up for a couple hundred dollars on Craigslist in many parts of the country. Take a summer and learn to sail on that. Beat the heck out of it, and put only as much money into it as you need to to sail safely. That won't teach you what it will be like to live aboard (most in that range don't have real cabins, though you CAN find some with room for one), but it WILL teach you the basics of sailing, and give you a chance to really see if sailing is for you. I grew up on powerboats from about age 10-20, and I can tell you that sailing is very different than having a powerboat. Rather than jumping in with both feet only to learn that you have a $50,000-$75,000 albatross to sell, a "disposable" dinghy makes a lot of sense. Perhaps something like this:
Sailboat with Trailer

Of course, you could also go with something like this:
1973 O'Day 27 with 9.9 Johnson

I have no affiliation with any of the sellers, just did a quick Craigslist search.
 

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Bombay Explorer 44
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3,619 Posts
Nothing wrong with your basic idea. Similar threads are posted here on a regular basis. There is a BIG difference between a 36 ft boat and 45 ft one. EG on a 36 ft you can recover the anchor by hand even on all chain rode. On the 45 ft one you most likely can't you have to have a windlass.

If you have common sense you can learn enough about basic sail handling to sail in a few days with someone to show you the ropes. However boat handling in confined spaces like a typical marina is not so easily learned and mistakes will be costly.

At 36 ft your budget of 75k will enable you to buy a near turnkey boat.

A Cabo Rico 38ft cutter would be a good tough boat to single hand around the world.

Something like this CLICKY OOPS just noticed it has teak decks which have NO PLACE on a long term cruising boat.
 

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Solon
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22 Posts
Seems like everyone is saying I should wait and get a smaller boat 1st. So I guess I will hold off on buying a big boat for now unless I come across a really good deal on one. I just have the sailing fever so bad right now. I have fell in love with thought of just sailing away and not looking back. But I do need to learn a lot before I take off in a sailboat and change my whole life.
I live in Nashville Tennessee and not much sailing goes on here lol. I was thinking if I did buy a large boat 38' to 42' . I could get get someone to teach me to sail it. While I lived on it. I didn't think I would need years of training. Iv been reading the wrongs things I guess. I was hoping in 2 to 4 months I would know how to sail and could take off.
I guess for now I'm looking for a sailboat in the 20' range. This site has been so helpful and I enjoy all the good reading on here. I just see all the nice looking boats for sail and they seem so cheap for what your getting.
After being in the car wreck Iv changed my whole outlook on life. I just want spend the rest of life being happy. Watching the videos on youtube on sailing has made me want the life.
Having a sailboat that can take you anywhere in the world just seems so right. I'v always been the type of person who hates waiting on anything, but when it comes learning to do something that may save your life I will. Thanks for all the advice and hope for more. If anyone can think of anything else I should know or do please do....thanks Solon
 

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Registered
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1,608 Posts
Learning the basics of sailing isn't rocket science and can be done fairly quickly.
What takes a lot of time is experience. Knowing what to do when you are in the middle of the ocean and the s..t hits the fan, separates the boys from the men or in this case, the newbies from experienced sailors.
 

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Daniel - Norsea 27
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1,258 Posts
Solon,

I am staying about an hour north in Clarksville. When I was looking around for a marina, I stopped by a couple down on Percy Priest. There seems to be a little sailing down there. See if you can find someone at Hamilton Creek Marina, that's primarily sailing. There's also Nashville Shores Marina and Elm Hill Marina that have some sailing. I didn't stop by Elm Hill but I did stop by the other two and they're all on the North end of the lake, near the airport. I'm not sure of other marinas, like on Old Hickory lake but I do know there are others. You might be able to find someone who could take you out and show you a few things.

I ended up putting my boat an hour in the other direction from me up by Kentucky Lake and Lake Barkley.
 

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Registered
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2,170 Posts
I really think it would be beneficial to invest a little in a sailing vacation, the longer the better, you'll learn a lot and be better able to understand what you want and need from a boat. Whatever you spend on quality instruction and familiarization with boats first hand on the ocean will probably be returned in future when you invest some real bank. Don't take someone's else's opinion about keels, wheels, heavy and slow, or light the rockets and go, form your own. This is just one school, shop around for somewhere you like.
Sailing Courses ? Offering the Best Sailing Courses in America | Offshore Sailing School
 

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Life is a wild ride!
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410 Posts
Some friends of mine went on vacation to Florida last year and as part of the experience they chartered a sailboat. A captain actually sailed the boat but they all had to pitch in with sail handling, cooking, etc. The captain was generous enough to teach their 2 boys the basics of sailing and they got to experience the chores that go along with the tropical dreams. I don't know how much they paid for the charter but I do know that they are not that well off so it had to be reasonable.

I would second the advice about finding a way to spend time on some boats in the size range you're looking for. The only boat I've ever owned was a 32' Endeavour and I absolutely loved it! I owned the boat for almost 2 years before I sold it and it taught me a lot about what I will be looking for in my next boat. There is a very limited amount of space in a sailboat to pack in a galley, head, berths, storage, settee's and so on. And all boats that are 36' are NOT created equal. They will handle differently. Some will be fast and exciting, some not so much. Even the layout of the deck gear can change your mind about a boat. I had no autohelm on mine so ever time I had to tack I wished vehemently that the winches were closer to the wheel. I prefer a tiller over a wheel anyway. I never thought about that until I found myself turning the wheel the wrong way!

If you can get some time on different types and models of boats in your size range, and especially if you can get helm and sail handling time, you will have a MUCH better understanding of WHAT you need to look for and WHY. And overnight stays on the boat will give you a better idea of what type of interior layout will work best for you. Also, now is a good time to start making notes about where in the world you want to sail to. Your primary cruising area and the type of use you intend will be a big determining factor in what type of boat will best serve your needs. In fact, keep notes and even pictures of things you like or dislike for future reference when you're ready to buy that bigger boat.

Jimgo gave you a great piece of advice about buying a small cheap boat to learn the basics on. If I had the money right now, I would check into that 27' O'day in a heartbeat! That boat would fit nicely on either Percy Priest or Old Hickory lake nicely. I live in Franklin, KY just north of Nashville and my boat was on Percy Priest at Nashville shores when I purchased it. You will find that if you walk the docks at any marina, the sailboat owners LOVE to talk about their boats and most will be glad to show you around. They tend to be a bit more laid back than the powerboaters and there is a good chance that someone would be glad to have a bit of company for a day sail around those areas.

Good luck with your plans and don't be shy about asking questions here. :)
 

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Registered
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1,348 Posts
I'm wondering what boats are catching your eye at the moment ? Also, I'm assuming you would like to ocean cruise . Any thoughts what coast you would like to start from ? Could it be regulated by where the boat is laying ? Out here on the west coast we have a mag. called Latitude 38 it is a wonderful thing and can be seen on the web. They have a rally called the Baja Ha Ha it starts late Oct . In that rally you wind up down south in Mexico , then if that's not enough for you . You start what they call the Pacific Puddle jump . And you wind up in the South Pacific and on to your world cruise.
 

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Solon
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22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The East cost and the Gulf of Mexico. Im still looking for a nice boat, but have went down in size I think a 38' or 36' would be fine. I didnt relize how much they are to learn. But Im still going to it this year. As soon as I find a good boat at a good price.
what are good sites to boat shop on? The only two I know of is Boat Trader and Popyatch. All help is wanted and will be very thankful
 

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'81 H22 & '86 Legend 37
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75 Posts
The East cost and the Gulf of Mexico. Im still looking for a nice boat, but have went down in size I think a 38' or 36' would be fine. I didnt relize how much they are to learn. But Im still going to it this year. As soon as I find a good boat at a good price.
Solon, as I read I have to admire your dream and knowing what you want to do. But I'm curious as to why you want a 36 or 38 foot boat to start out with? Is it just you going cruising, or do you have a partner/wife/girlfriend going too?

Smaller boats are easier to learn on, easier to single-hand, cost less for slips etc, less to maintain. Just curious as to why the length specification seems important to you.
 

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bell ringer
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5,560 Posts
Going the "buy a small boat first" route is just a money waster, IF it turns out you really do enjoy sailing. I started out 7 years ago with the same basic goals and this is how I did it (I had never sailed and was 47):

- I spent 2 years researching and reading, this was longer than planned as things got in my way to getting started
- My wife and I took ASA lessons to become bareboat certified. And I looked around for a school where I spent all the sailing on a boat that was aimed at my goals of cruising so didn't sail in dinghies or day sailers and were on a 36' boat instead
- I joined a local sailing club and sailed for 3 months of weekends on a 33&34' boat (just my wife and I and maybe a guest on the boat)
- I got my first boat, a Cal-39, and we sailed it every weekend slowly increasing what we did etc. We knew pretty quickly we wanted a bigger boat, but sailed the Cal for 2 years
- Replaced the 39' with a 43' boat (41' on deck). The amount of extra space and features were a HUGE plus and unless we come across free money this is going to be our boat for cruising off

The things to take away:
- you don't need to learn and spend time on small boats
- reading and research really do count and move you along faster (I hope to never experience some of the things I've studied up for)
- learn to sail on the types of boats you plan to use
- sail enough to be sure you like it before buying a boat
- get the boat you want first, it just wastes time and money to change your mind
- sailing isn't hard to learn or do, but sailing well takes time and experience but doesn't have to be done at home
 

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129 Posts
Hi Solon,
I think I understand where you want to be as I'm searching to fulfill my life dreams as well. Something happened when I got sick in 2007 and my life changed and I started to look for peace. Things have settled and I'm going to do this! I'm not a sailor and probably to old to take to much physical activity on, but I've asked this forum how much physical work is involved. As usual you will get various comments and certainly a lot of advice from folks who have the right experience.
When I look at the boat we are going to buy (Northern 29) it's a thing of beauty. We could live comfortably on it and if it stays in its slip for the first season, so be it! I want to take my time and learn what we could eventually do. Just think, this boat could take you anywhere you'd like to go. We have friends who belong to Golf Clubs, Tennis Clubs, own cottages, so what's wrong with owning a sailboat?
I would never attempt to do anything that will endanger ourselves and others around us. I started watching You Tube videos like "Becoming Elizabeth" and "Cruising Lealea" and I just couldn't stop this dream.
Solon, I hope you find exactly what you are looking for and find the peace you need.
Fair Winds my Friend!
 
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