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So here is what i am looking for. Good value, long lasting, and great performance.

Good value: hopefully under $2k for a 135 Genoa for a 30 ft boat.

Long lasting: I wanna keep it on a curler, under a sock so not UV exposed except when sailing, would like 8-10 years of life. My sails on the boat are literally 20-30 years old.

Performance: Not looking for all out race sails, BUT would like a nice boost of performance over my old Dacron sails, while even new Dacron is gonna be better than old Dacron, I'd like a nice little boost.

Anyone have experience with NEWISH cruising laminates? I know 10 years ago they were brittle and suffered from mildew issues, but I hear that the new laminates have very few downsides...
 

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Freedom isn't free
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Hard to beat dacron...
Fx Sails are inexpensive, and the quality is good.
Better brands will be more pricey... North, Quantum, Doyle.

If you can't get FX to get you a good price, another option is Rolly Tasker.

I've ordered D4 Loadpaths from epsails the last 2 seasons, and I have to say I am extremely impressed (but then this is my first experience with new sails). Regardless, they are not furler sails, nor are they a long term sail, they are instead great racing sails. So maybe I am not the best one to say where to find sails for furlers.

I paid roughly $1500 for a 155 loadpath, so getting under $2000 should be doable for you.
 

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I have a new cruising laminate main on the way. I talked to a few lofts about them and did a lot of research and couldn't find anything majorly bad about CAL (the cruising laminate technology that I chose) compared to Dacron. I don't race my boat, but I do value having it perform well.

I don't like how Dacron sails stretch and deform over time. They may have a long ultimate lifetime, but it didn't seem like a long functional lifetime. I'm hoping that my CAL sail will provide good performance longer than a high end Dacron sail. It might not last as long, but I don't want to sail with a Dacron sail that was used weekly for 10-15 years either.

I have a new Dacron genoa to compare against. In 3-5 years maybe I'll have some idea of how the CAL and Dacron are comparing over the long term. I expect that I'll be uphappy with the shape of my Dacron genoa by that point, and I'll know how well my CAL main is holding up.

I wonder if those who jump straight to recommending Dacron have ever sailed on a boat with good laminate sails, or even brand new Dacron sails, and understand had badly stretched and worn the average Dacron sail is. CAL is still a compromise compared to a loadpath sail, but it should have much better durability.
 

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Freedom isn't free
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My laminate sails (I have a 155, 135, and main, in Loadpath):


One can "shape" dacron if you have all the controls. Yes they stretch, and lose shape faster than laminate. But Newport was hoping for a LONG LASTING sail, that he'd be satisfied with.

The laminate sails keep their shape longer than dacron for sure, but their longevity just isn't there.

On top of that he wanted to put it on a furler. I don't think laminate is as good a choice for that, even with a furler cover.
 

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I have the controls (cunningham, backstay adjuster that does curve the mast, vang strong enough to curve the boom, high purchase outhaul) to shape my dacron sails, but they do get to a point where you just can't get them as flat as you need to for a strong breeze. If you could then there would be no market for laminate sails. On my current main the bottom can be made quite flat and the draft moved as far forward as you want, but the top half to 2/3rds of the sail always has a pretty deep belly.

This results in earlier than ideal reefing.

The OP is talking about cruising laminates, not racing laminates. They have some compromises from racing laminates to make them more appropriate to cruising and durable for roller furling use. There is more in this advertising bit (note that it is written by China Sail Factory, many "lofts" sell these sails):
http://islandplanetsails.com/resources/cal.pdf

I'd agree, talk to your sail maker. When I described what I wanted out of a sail all but one of the lofts that I and a friend talked to recommended a cruising laminate. I had ignored them when purchasing my genoa because I assumed they were too expensive, but now regret having made that choice and wish I had bought a cruising laminate there too.
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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Long lasting, excellent wearing, but not cheap: Hydranet.

Hydra Net® - Sailcloth Technology by DIMENSION-POLYANT - Sailcloth and laminates for high performance sailing and polyestersailcloth for surf

But honestly you should be having this discussion with your sailmaker, not us hacks :)
Have been thinking of sewing a new 120% headsail to go between the 160 genny and working jib and have been considering whether to try using one of these newer fabrics. The Dyneema fabric idea sounds good BUT Dyneema does stretch over time. I have Dyneema lifelines and runners. The stuff is very strong and has almost no stretch in the short term but definitely stretches out considerably over time. Would hate to pay a premium price for some new tech that fails the time test.
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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The line I used is standard grey Amsteel. I have noticed some stretch in the lifelines. Occasionally, like once during a season, I have to restring the lashings to tighten them back up. It's no issue at all in a line but in a sail, I wonder whether it's actually any better than Dacron as far as durability. I have sewn a number of sails now with regular dacron sailcloth but would try something new if it was really longer lasting. Dacron certainly does lose its shape after a while.
 

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I would posit that your line stretch is actually 'constructional stretch,' where the line braid is nestling together as you tighten the line. If you were bringing some real tension on the line, like as for rigging, the process would complete itself sooner. My ex-boat had Dynex Dux (heat treated Dyneema line produced by Hampidjan) shrouds, and since I trailered the boat, I had several cycles of re-adjustment before the lines finally set.

If you want to learn about textile rigging, I suggest going to Brion Toss' website, there are forums there, and Toss is one of the world's experts on textile rigging.

In all my searching and in my discussions with my sailmaker, I heard nothing but good things about the Hydranet. Handles like Dacron, lasts like Dacron, but keeps its shape like a laminate. So I went for the Hydranet. It was quite expensive compared to Dacron, but in the long run I expect it will balance out.

Cruising laminates have indeed come a long way. My trimaran's laundry was Contender MAXX with a soft finish. I was well pleased with the cloth performance. But for my big cat, and for sails which stay out in the weather (albeit covered), I'd just as soon have a weave, as I believe that the temperature and humidity swings are too much for even the best laminates out there presently unless I wanted a more frequent replacement cycle.

YMMV.
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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+1 on Brion Toss. I have his Rigger's Apprentice on the boat. It is a great book. I will definitely look into the Hydranet to make my next sail. Thanks for your opinion and advice.
 

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2008 Jeanneau 39i S/V Grace
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One thing you should bear in mind is the handicap offset you'll lose if you plan on racing in your local regattas. This is the same decision I'm mulling after replacing my furler.


Sent from my iPhone using Sausage-like fingers
 
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