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Water Lover
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773 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
It would be great to find some very old copies of Chapman's "Seamanship", especially something affordable from 1922 through the early 1930s, or even one of the 1917-1921 original "Practical Motor Boat Handling...." several editions. Does anyone know of any floating around?

Charles F. Chapman was the original author of the boating textbook that has been maintained through many editions of what is now the Chapman Piloting, Seamanship, and Small Boat Handling compendium, with the 2013 67th edition outweighing some small boat anchors.

It started out as more modest 6x9" book of 144-ish pages or so in 1917 when then-Secretary of the Navy Roosevelt asked the editor of MoTor Boating and Sailing for an instruction manual on small boat handling as the US's involvement in WW I neared. It was then titled "Practical Motor Boat Handling, Seamanship and Piloting: (A Handbook Containing Information which Every Motor Boatman Should Know. Especially Prepared for the Man who Takes Pride in Handling His Own Boat and Getting the Greatest Enjoyment Out of Cruising. Adapted for the Yachtsman Interested in Fitting Himself to be of Service to His Government in Time of War)"

From what's published about the book, that original book went through six editions until 1922, when it was renamed (A Course In) Piloting, Seamanship, and Small Boat Handling.

Original are rare; there is a supposedly cheesy, hard-to-read modern print on demand reproduction of the 1917 book, and I've seen the 1917 book as a download (Google books). I'd love to find some of the very old editions that are affordable.

p. 98: "It is not permissible to fly more than one flag from the same hoist, nor a flag with a name spelled out thereon. This is a most terrible breach of etiquette for which there is no excuse."

p. 101: [An open boat] "shall fly the owner's private signal at the bow staff, while the boat is underway, and the club signal while she is at anchor."

pp. 131-132. A well-equipped boat should have provisions such as "jars of sliced bacon, smoked beef, and codfish", miscellaneous supplies such as "fire arms", a "graphaphone and records", "hatchet", and "caulking irons", and china and glassware service for eight, including "One cream pitcher", "twelve high ball glasses" and "three decanters".

p. 133, The galley should have a "fireless cooker", "One large and one small preserving kettle", "Six pie plates", and a "Cocktail shaker".

Following a page and a half of tools are the Navy's recommendations for Medical Kit on p. 134, including, "Lead and opium tables", "Cathartic tablets", "Mustard plasters", and "Whiskey".

And in Navy Signaling, p. 137, K is for "Kink" and L is for "Love". Of course, S is for "Sail".
 

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Registered
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I find them at library fundraiser-used book sales. I leave the old ones, since I want the more up to date versions. Hardcover books are frequently $5 each. Half price the next day.
 

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sunfish?junior?
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749 Posts
I will keep it in mind and will contact you on this tread if I see one. My own new edition is all I know about .
Good day, Lou
 

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Master Mariner
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8,671 Posts
I have had a lot of success finding out of print books on odd subjects from Alibris, on the web.
 

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Old enough to know better
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4,344 Posts
It would be fun to have a digital copy of the original or early version! I have the current version, though I can't seem to find it. I am sure it is in a box in the shed, but could not find it the other day. For current versions, I found it on sale at Barns and Noble and then used a coupon and member discount and got it quite cheap.
 

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Water Lover
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Discussion Starter #7
Stumble, and all. Thanks! I'd seen an original edition before, but the bidding was aat $75 and climbing. I think the Abe books 2nd edition will be one of the revised editions 2-6 that would have published after the February 1917 original, but before the 1922 renaming. So I've ordered it. I read through the digital scanned copy of the original on Google books.

Here's one of the linkies...
Practical Motor Boat Handling, Seamanship and Piloting: A Handbook ... - Charles Frederic Chapman - Google Books

Practical Motor Boat Handling, Seamanship and Piloting: A Handbook ... - Charles Frederic Chapman - Google Books

It was also interesting to learn that as of 1917, Life Preservers could be rectangular wooden floats, but not pneumatic devices, nor filled with granulated cork. So, my auto-inflatable wouldn't have passed muster with the Board of Examiners in 1917.
 

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Old enough to know better
Joined
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4,344 Posts
Stumble, and all. Thanks! I'd seen an original edition before, but the bidding was aat $75 and climbing. I think the Abe books 2nd edition will be one of the revised editions 2-6 that would have published after the February 1917 original, but before the 1922 renaming. So I've ordered it. I read through the digital scanned copy of the original on Google books.

Here's one of the linkies...
Practical Motor Boat Handling, Seamanship and Piloting: A Handbook ... - Charles Frederic Chapman - Google Books

Practical Motor Boat Handling, Seamanship and Piloting: A Handbook ... - Charles Frederic Chapman - Google Books

It was also interesting to learn that as of 1917, Life Preservers could be rectangular wooden floats, but not pneumatic devices, nor filled with granulated cork. So, my auto-inflatable wouldn't have passed muster with the Board of Examiners in 1917.
Good to see that it is on G00gle books, will have to read it some night!
 

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Water Lover
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773 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Does this sound like your kind of "yachting"?

"The gun for colors at 8 o'clock in the morning and at sun set in the evening should be fired from the yacht of the senior officer in the fleet, whether or not the officer is on board.
Upon entering an anchorage, captains should salute the commanding officer of the anchorage by firing one gun or by dipping the ensign once at the moment of letting go of the anchor.
On ordinary occasions, when the commodore's yacht enters a harbor, his yacht should be saluted by one gun or by dipping the ensign from the yacht of the senior officer present, and this salute should be acknowledged in kind by the commodore. However, should the commodore be entering the harbor to take personal command of his squadron he should be saluted when he drops anchor, by the firing of one gun, or the dipping of the ensign by each yacht in the squadron. This salute should be acknowledged by one gun from the flagship."
Chapman, Charles Frederic, "Practical Boat Handling, Piloting and Seamanship", p. 105, Feb. 1917, MoTor Boating.
 
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