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looking for any info on our 1973 Yankee 38

We have just adopted hull #11 of 30 of these made. Since the Yankee Yacht Co went out of business in the mid 70s & there were so few made, there is little info to be had on this One-Ton Class IOR racing boat. We are aware that the plug was sold to Catalina to become the Catalina 38. Any info would be a great help. Thanks all.
 

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Hello. We just bought Yankee 38 hull number 21. We are redoing most everything at a yard in Seattle. The engine was changed to a Yanmar 3GM30 a while back. Any feed back from other YY38 owners or Yanmar 3GM30 owners would be appreciated. We hope to relaunch in May.
 

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I had YY hull#14. I bought it as a project and brought it back to sailing condition about ten years ago. It was very heavily built and well constructed. It was a stiff boat that could really carry sail, though not as nimble around the buoys as more modern lighter designs with true fin keels. In a breeze and in a seaway she really came into her own, and was much much more seakindly and solid feeling than other similar boats. I sailed on a J-41 a lot then, and although that boat could sail circles around me, it pounded like a surfboard in a big sea and was hard on the helmsman keeping her off the wind. Never the Yankee. They were built for offshore work. IOR designs got an undeserved bad name after the 79' Fastnet race disaster. But if I had to get rolled or pitchpoled, I'd rather do it in a Yankee 38 than just about any other boat. It would track very well on or off the wind, and had some weather helm on the wind but not too much.

The lines of the hull are very pretty to my eye. I never was a fan of the humped deck though, and particularly disliked the camber of the deck/cabin. When heeled, it made the leeward slope of the deck all the more steep and felt very insecure, as opposed to a proper flat deck with a high toe-rail or bulwark. However it must be said that the deck was a great design for offshore sailing in that there was very little for a malevolent wave to get a hold of to break, and the ports were small and secure. I liked the interior layout and rebuilt it to the original design, which was clearly offshore racing oriented. Eight little honeycomb compartments in the head (one for each crew member to tuck his cut-off toothbrush and towel), eight cabinets in the main saloon, each of equal size and big enough for a sea bag. All the drawers and cabinet openings had solid latches to keep their contents inside. Eight single bunks, and each one capable of being a good seaberth, with lee-cloths etc.

I raced her alot in PHRF club races. She did well in very light wind because she was heavy (16,800 lbs displ) and would carry her momentum better than newer boats, but was slower to accelerate for the same reason. In very heavy air she did well too. In moderate conditions she was usually back of the pack. I did a handful of near-coastal races too, and the only thing that kept her from winning was me.

Congratulations on your acquisition!
 

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Thanks for the insights. We plan to restore the boat to a cruising configuration with the galley on the starboard and chart table on port.
The plan is to sail in the Pacific Northwest from Seattle and around the San Juan islands where the weather can develop.
The Yankee 38 should handle what ever comes.
One plus for me was the ability to go to weather and that hull and sail plan design does that well.
This will be an "Old School" restoration with analog instruments and staying with the tiller.
With roller furling it will be ok for a couple to cruise.
Racing is not in the plans as I have "done that and got the tee shirt".
Fast and strong is our motto.

Fair winds to you.
 

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Hello we are new owners of the 1974 yankee 38 hull number 18 of 30. We to are looking to redo everything back to stock on this boat. I do love the way she handles but the po did not know what he was doing when he redid the interior, so we plan on ripping out what he did and go back to the original layout. Any photos of original interior layouts would be appreciated. Thank you
 
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