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Learning the HARD way...
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Having a nasty day here on Long Island hope they are not in it. Seems foolish to not have some type of tracking location transmitter on such a passage Delorme etc... Even AIS might be helpful in a search. I'm currently reading the Gathering Wind about the sinking of the BOUNTY. Expect the USCG has launched Hercules aircraft to try and make contact or relay any communications to SAR offices. Hope this ends with good news. Still early in the search though.
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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If they went just south of Block Island and then set a heading for Norfolk, it is about a 350nm trek. The rhum line heading is about 330º. At 6kts, that would take about 59hrs... However, because they would be headded DIRECTLY into the prevailing winds, they would not make 6kts for 59hrs. There are few bailout options along the south coast of Long Island or the Jersey shore, and all the bailout options would be 40+ miles to the west of this rhum line.

I did some Facebook research on the skipper. From what I could read, it seems to me that he bought an old ketch in 2017 and moved aboard. He ended up donating the ketch to charity in 2018 after he aquired the Benneteau. Most of his sailing seems to have been in or around Narragansett Bay. I could find no info on how the Benneteau was equipped, or his sailing education. He had a couple of young kids and a girlfriend. It was the girlfriend that alerted the Coast Guard that he was overdue for check in at Norfolk.

I hope this turns out well, but none of what I could find (above) makes it sound promising.
 
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Learning the HARD way...
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)

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Have done that trip multiple times to meet up with SDR to get to eastern Caribbean. In the fall every time the trip from Naragansett bay to Norfolk VA has been worse than Norfolk to BVI.
There’s no good bail point in a strong easterly until cape May. Given its so shallow for such a distance you’re not really off the continental shelf so even moderate waves break. Southerlies mean either motor sailing into square waves or tacking. To get a decent ride you can’t be hard on the wind. 45-55 degrees is much better.
If you hug the coast waves reflect off the shore or break on shoals so are confused.
Cold,wet, bumpy either sailing or motor sailing. Just sucks.
I’ve said on this site I’m convinced coastal is more difficult than ocean. This transit among many (coastal Portugal, Atlantic France, West US coast going north etc.) is among those that can be quite difficult in the fall.
Close friend on sistership is going Naragansett to howdy bailey (Norfolk) to get some work done. He waited last week out. Leaving tomorrow or Tuesday depending on what gribs and Parker say today. He’s taking three. Although a short passage it’s isn’t one where you can just set the AP and vane then sit back and watch AIS. Even at this time of year someone needs to be within a step of the wheel.
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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I am also making the trek from RI to Norfolk, VA. leaving next Monday (November 4). The boat is well-found, a Caliber 40LRC, and it has AIS. I will be helping two novice sailors bring their boat to the Bahamas. Once in Norfolk, they will take the ditch to Florida.

My plan is to take our time and transit Long Island Sound to Sandy Hook, NJ. We will then wait for a window to jump from Sandy Hook to Cape May. Once in Cape May I will decide to either go up the Delaware and down the Chesapeake, or around the outside to Norfolk, again weather dependent. I will check in with my wife every day, so my position and plan will be known within a 100 mile radius. I have planned on TEN days to make the trip, and will take longer if the weather doesn't cooperate.
 
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I've never been accused of that before! I think "conservative" might be more apropros.

Anyway, this thread is not about me, but about the crew aboard Carol K. Hoping for a happy ending.
 
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Learning the HARD way...
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Two men and their dog, who had been missing since setting sail from Jamestown, RI on Oct. 23, have been found safe about 100 miles off the coast of Cape Henry, NC, according to the U.S. Coast Guard.

Ryan Hollis, Joshua Kane Cairone, and a French bulldog named Louis-the-buoy were last seen aboard a white 43-foot Benneteau sailboat named Carol K. via social media post at 12:41 p.m., Wednesday, October 23.

The were found by a rescue aircrew flying an HC-130 out of Elizabeth City, NC.

Coast Guard watchstanders were first notified about the missing boaters from a phone call from Hollis’ girlfriend reporting him overdue Friday.

Search and rescue crews include an HC-130 aircrew from Coast Guard Air Station Elizabeth City, North Carolina, and an HC-144 aircrew from Air Station Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

Rescue crews completed multiple searches over large areas of the East Coast of the United States covering more than 30,000 square nautical miles.


#BreakingNews #UPDATE: The Coast Guard has safely located the two missing men and their dog 100 miles off the coast of Cape Henry, NC. They were found by a rescue aircrew flying an HC-130 out of Elizabeth City, NC. #SAR @USCGNortheast @uscgmidatlantic


— USCGNortheast (@USCGNortheast) October 28, 2019
 

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Two men and their dog, who had been missing since setting sail from Jamestown, RI on Oct. 23, have been found safe about 100 miles off the coast of Cape Henry, NC, according to the U.S. Coast Guard.

Ryan Hollis, Joshua Kane Cairone, and a French bulldog named Louis-the-buoy were last seen aboard a white 43-foot Benneteau sailboat named Carol K. via social media post at 12:41 p.m., Wednesday, October 23.

The were found by a rescue aircrew flying an HC-130 out of Elizabeth City, NC.

Coast Guard watchstanders were first notified about the missing boaters from a phone call from Hollis’ girlfriend reporting him overdue Friday.

Search and rescue crews include an HC-130 aircrew from Coast Guard Air Station Elizabeth City, North Carolina, and an HC-144 aircrew from Air Station Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

Rescue crews completed multiple searches over large areas of the East Coast of the United States covering more than 30,000 square nautical miles.


#BreakingNews #UPDATE: The Coast Guard has safely located the two missing men and their dog 100 miles off the coast of Cape Henry, NC. They were found by a rescue aircrew flying an HC-130 out of Elizabeth City, NC. #SAR @USCGNortheast @uscgmidatlantic


— USCGNortheast (@USCGNortheast) October 28, 2019
Uh Cape Henry North Carolina is near Raleigh according to Google. Probably meant to say Cape Henry Virginia. Still good news they were found safe and sound. Still think a lot of effort and anxiety could have been avoided had they just carried a cheap tracking device like a Delorme or Inreach device. Seems like cheap insurance for their passage.
 

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Perhaps they continued past VA and that's why they're overdue.
 

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Still think a lot of effort and anxiety could have been avoided had they just carried a cheap tracking device like a Delorme or Inreach device. Seems like cheap insurance for their passage.
No. A lot of effort and anxiety could be avoided by simply managing expectations of shore people. These almost weekly BOLA's are annoying. It seems like everyone thinks cruising is done to time tables like airlines or trains, and apparently those doing the cruising have failed to manage the expectations of those they leave behind.

Cruising should not be about constant tracking and having shore assistance alerting authorities the very minute or hour one does not make their intended destination. In this case, and every other one in recent memory, a Delorme-type device provides no insurance at all, because everyone was safe and happy anyway. It might have saved much money on SAR sorties in this case, but that isn't the purpose of those devices, and this type of situation could easily be avoided without one.

In a case last year or so, the Delorme actually CAUSED a SAR to commence because it stopped transmitting for a day.

Instead, an EPIRB and rugged communication gear like SSB or Satphone - activated when needed by the ship crew - is the correct answer.

I'm afraid we may be entering an age of crying wolf that is going to bite someone in real trouble eventually.

Mark
 

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Seems to be kinda dumb and inconsiderate not to have a locator or AIS B or a regular radio / telephone schedule. If they weren't lost or in distress... they endangered the USCG and wasted a lot of money for those searches.
 

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Seems to be kinda dumb and inconsiderate not to have a locator or AIS B or a regular radio / telephone schedule. If they weren't lost or in distress... they endangered the USCG and wasted a lot of money for those searches.
The boat crew didn't endanger anyone or waste any time - the shore person/people did. I guess by extension the boat people could be blamed for not managing the shore people correctly, but I've no way of knowing this.

Like I mentioned earlier, there was one case recently where a SAR was initiated because a locator stopped transmitting for a day and the owner left instructions to call authorities if he was lost.

This is not the correct way of handling emergencies. The boat crew themselves are responsible for initiating SAR, and should be equipped to do so. The exception might be something like "I'm due at my next landfall around X date. If you don't hear from me by X+Y date, then alert authorities". The "Y" in this case would be a large number proportional to "X".

It would not be hours, or even a couple of days.

I'm not sure how an AIS would have helped in this situation. That isn't really a ship-shore communication.

Mark
 

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The boat crew didn't endanger anyone or waste any time - the shore person/people did. I guess by extension the boat people could be blamed for not managing the shore people correctly, but I've no way of knowing this.

Like I mentioned earlier, there was one case recently where a SAR was initiated because a locator stopped transmitting for a day and the owner left instructions to call authorities if he was lost.

This is not the correct way of handling emergencies. The boat crew themselves are responsible for initiating SAR, and should be equipped to do so. The exception might be something like "I'm due at my next landfall around X date. If you don't hear from me by X+Y date, then alert authorities". The "Y" in this case would be a large number proportional to "X".

It would not be hours, or even a couple of days.

I'm not sure how an AIS would have helped in this situation. That isn't really a ship-shore communication.

Mark
Well yeah... and AIS B can be followed online even if the position lags.
 

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The boat crew didn't endanger anyone or waste any time - the shore person/people did. I guess by extension the boat people could be blamed for not managing the shore people correctly, but I've no way of knowing this.

Like I mentioned earlier, there was one case recently where a SAR was initiated because a locator stopped transmitting for a day and the owner left instructions to call authorities if he was lost.

This is not the correct way of handling emergencies. The boat crew themselves are responsible for initiating SAR, and should be equipped to do so. The exception might be something like "I'm due at my next landfall around X date. If you don't hear from me by X+Y date, then alert authorities". The "Y" in this case would be a large number proportional to "X".

It would not be hours, or even a couple of days.

I'm not sure how an AIS would have helped in this situation. That isn't really a ship-shore communication.

Mark
Yeah agree the shore relations could have chilled a bit. But, a cheap Sat Traker would have taken away any fear that they were in trouble with reassuring breadcrumb locations posted online. If it fails as you mention at least the SAR crew have a last known location which would narrow any search area which is a very good thing.

EPIRB may or may not be activated depending on the nature of the emergency. Remember El Faro? But I agree would be very good to have. Still does not ease the worry of family or friends.

Sat Phone a real plus but $$$.

SSB is fine as long as you have power and the rigging is still up.

AIS signal might be picked up by nearby shipping and noted in Ships Log and be able assist any SAR with a location.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
The skipper seems to have provided a float plan to a responsible person. The responsible person alerted the CG, as they should, when the boat was overdue to check in.

The skipper should have alerted the responsible person when/if he deviated from the float plan.

SAR did what they are supposed to do. Dudes and dog are safe.

I feel for the dog.
 
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