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Hi there! We are a family of four soon to be living aboard our 45' Dufour Ketch. I wanted to see if I could get some good ideas with regards to stocking the galley with utensils. Brand names of different pots/pans, etc. I'm admittedly a "so so" cook and am nervous about making the switch to live aboard and eventually taking off sailing this December.

Thank you in advance.
 

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Hello Phil and Aimee,

Welcome to sailnet. What kind of pots and pans do you have at home? Wouldn't you want to take your favorites with you?

I tend to choose pots and pans for their intended purpose, rather than a particular brand. I think the only " matched set" I ever owned is a copper bottom, stainless farberware set someone gifted with my 1st apt. It's still around though.

Otherwise, I have specialty omelet pans, stockpots, saute pans, sauce pans, woks etc.
I even have a large variety of cast iron pans. Many of the above are commercial grade, accumulated over the years.

Many folks here like to use crock-pots and seem to love them.

There are so many "designer" brands and choices out there now and some get pretty pricey. Frankly, I think it's unnecessary to spend huge dollars on Celebrity pot sets.

Commercial cookwear tends to be Stainless, Steel, Aluminum and occasionally copper

When you get in to home use, you get into bi-metals, non-sticks, glass lids vs metal lids etc. Some of the lids and knobs are not oven proof. I saw a very expensive French mfg Dutch Oven..who's lid knob was not oven proof. For about $330.00 less I purchased one that required no modification and frankly I could see no difference that warranted that price differential.

So, my advice might be to start with your typical menu items and find the pot that you like best for that purpose.
 

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Super Fuzzy Moderator
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Why would you go out and buy all new ? If you have recently, or are planning to soon, move aboard your boat then surely you'd just take all or some of your home gear. With the obvious exception of the electrical appliances.

You'll soon figure out what works and what doesn't. Discard and replace as you go along.
 

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We use pans with removable handles so that they stack into each other and use less room to stow, but we also have a small iron griddle and a small wok. We use Corelle dishes since they don't break.

One of the bigger use items that we didn't use on land is a pressure cooker. We make a lot of meals in it since it cooks so much faster, and we also use it for some canning.
 

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+1 on The Boat Galley and using what you already own until it has to be replaced.
 

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Theres a lot of threads on on the topic, I will try to find some cause the search function sucks
I usually find that checking the bottom of the page in the Similar Threads section produces good results. I see some threads there now that might prove useful.
 

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Thank you for the helpful ideas. We plan to take most of what we already own, just wasn't sure about rust if there were better alternatives.
I've had the same set of non-stick pots onboard for 10 years. No rust issues.

I've had some steak knives develop rust, but thats about it.
 

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Mermaid Hunter
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We use pans with removable handles so that they stack into each other and use less room to stow
I haven't found any pans with removable handles that are sufficiently strong and stable to be worth cooking in. YMMV.
 

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Old soul
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We've had a Magma nonstick set for nearly 8 years now. Stackable, with removable handles. Great quality, no problem with nonstick. Removable handles mean easy storage. And we cook all the time when on the boat.

Also have a pressure cooker with small grips as opposed to a long handle. Makes for easier storage. Love it.


Why go fast, when you can go slow
 

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We've had a Magma nonstick set for nearly 8 years now. Stackable, with removable handles. Great quality, no problem with nonstick. Removable handles mean easy storage. And we cook all the time when on the boat.

Also have a pressure cooker with small grips as opposed to a long handle. Makes for easier storage. Love it.

Why go fast, when you can go slow
+1 on Mike's recommendation of the Magma non-stick cookware.

For us saving space is a big deal (30 footer). We store the nesting Magma cookware in the oven. We also have a good quality (All-Clad) stainless saute pan.

Having good quality sharp knives makes prep more pleasurable.

As long as you go with quality stuff a lot of it is really personal preference.

Oh, and the paella thread has me thinking I may need to add a paella pan this summer :D
 

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snake charmer, cat herder
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i use exactly what i used to use when i lived on land, only i keep it in a boat. comfort, if living aboard is important. if not comfortable, not happy. not happy , bye bye boatie. soooo... be happy. use what you want to use.
(same with bedding.)
i have cut down on number of pots and pans, but i still use cast iron , 3 items, with lids, and sauce pans, 2, and fry pans, 2. one presto pressure cooker.
i also have a number of bbqs for boat use, and one for dock or deck. i use charcoal, but not briquettes, as i favor mexican mesquite or manzanito.
there are no rules of what is and is not appropriate on a boat in which one resides. there are handed down lies and stories which influence some folks, but those are irrelevant. they were beliefs i , too, maintained, until i started cruising, at which time i learned how dumb they are.....lol.
cardboard is irrelevant, as bugs fly. they have and use wings. read at night, you receive company. you will want to do , not fumigate nor fogging, but intensively spray all surfaces every 6 months with the strongest local insecticide, commercial or industrial strength, as raid dont work in tropics...lol dont bother asking how i know...lol..... you will learn rapidly.
double bag and use twist top gasketed containers for everything...check all plastic bagged items for holes in bag frequently..
keep beeswax in toilet ring seal form as well as board wx. wax is excellent for unsqueaking sliding hatches and making drawers more easy to use and with a smoother action. the toilet seal wax is good for use when your cutlass bearing in questionable and you need to make sure no water comes into boat..stuff the culo del barco with toilet seal wax , which will not hurt the cutlass nor shaft nor shaft log. excellent water stopping tool.
have spare electrical testing equipment. if you use special bulbs in your lights, carry spares x 3.
as problems never coincide with business hours of stores, it is wise to practice up for cruising. stuff always happens when ye dont have anything on hand, and no where to get it.
 

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Bombay Explorer 44
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Consider a bum strap to hold you in place while cooking.

Medium size pressure cooker is essential IMHO [ stainless may be better but mine is ali ]. I use mine a lot on passage without the seal as there is no danger of the lid coming off. People have died at sea from galley inflicted burns.

At anchor it gets used for soups stews etc and popcorn.

Take a spare seal.

You want to avoid cardboard so decant stuff into tupperware style storage containers. If you buy locally bagged stuff you will get bugs sooner or later. Good tupperware keeps them contained. Measure your storage space accurately and go on a hunt for top quality square or rectangular tall ? stackable containers that best fit available space. If your fridge is a top loader you may want to consider same for stuff like salad. It also makes it easier to find stuff. I am tall so can reach the bottom of my fridge but shorties can not.

I use lots of ziplock bags.

Stainless steel thermos flasks are good if you sail in colder waters but have their uses in warmer climes. Have one with a wide mouth. If going to a pot luck/beach barby/dinghydrift etc they can keep your cocktail of choice cold as well. Mine is a painkiller please.

Measure your oven and buy the biggest baking tray that will fit. Try and find ali if you can. Two bread tins that will fit side by side are good too if you plan to bake.

If you are heading west across the Pacific your last US visit should be to a supermarket. You are going to get serious sticker shock in the islands. Rice / pasta / cous cous / ramen will be reasonably cheap and available but things like tinned chicken/salmon/ham will be at least 2x or more so stock up on things like that and your favourite spices. Mexico will be affordable,, the Marquesas will be extortionate.
 

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Bombay Explorer 44
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I get nervous about the idea of being secured to the cooker. Most boats there is a way to wedge yourself in against normal boat motion.
I agree. My current boat allows me to wedge myself in as it a corridor galley. However if I was doing a trade wind passage like the OP plans to do I think I would still fit a bum strap in front of the work surface.

My previous boat did not have a corridor kitchen. The bum strap was fitted to one side of the stove in front of the work surface. It was essential when the trade wind roll started and went on for days. The stove was a Flavel Vanessa on gimbals but stuff came off the top despite having fiddles a couple of times and keeping the bread tins in the oven required gaffer tape as the oven door spring was weak.
 

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I don't like non-stick coatings, but luckily Magma makes their high quality pots in normal stainless as well.

We carry the small Magma set plus a cast iron omelette pan on the boat and that covers all of my needs. My boat is smaller and space is limited. I'm curious about pressure cookers and might get a small one to try, but will need to figure out where to store it.
 

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navigator
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And along the lines of safety: suggest a hot liquid proof apron for use in the galley while cooking. Many bad burns result from the waist down when liquids spill from the galley stove or counter tops. Protect the sensitive areas first, unless you are into feet sex. Especially important in warm climates where you may be cooking with only shorts on....or in the buff. And don't forget the fire blanket, much more effective than the small fire extinguishers often purchased for galley fires.
 
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