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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought an 82 Northern 37K and it is in fantastic shape. I wanted to make some changes (I know - why make chages if it is in fantastic shape) to put my own touches on it. I have an old brochure but nothing else on the boat. Any ideas where I might be able to find something or at the very least where to start looking to find manuals. I'd prefer to know some of the technical specifics of the boat before I start making too many changes and it will help me to identify mods already done by the previous owners. Thanks
 

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Aspiring Boat Bum
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As Minnewaska mentioned, most manuals with a boat are for the engine, electronics, etc and are specific to the manufacturer of that equipment. Never seen a manual for the boat itself other than a glorified sales brochure. Maybe if you could elaborate on exactly what kind of changes you're considering?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks to all - yeah I realized after the request that it would have to be specific to different systems on the boat and it has been modified to some extent. I have manuals for specific pieces of equipment and the boat was repowered with a Perkins diesel (I have the manual on that). Was hoping to get electrical/wiring diagrams, but I may to get that info through my own work on the boat.
 

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As Minnewaska mentioned, most manuals with a boat are for the engine, electronics, etc and are specific to the manufacturer of that equipment. Never seen a manual for the boat itself other than a glorified sales brochure. Maybe if you could elaborate on exactly what kind of changes you're considering?
My boat came with a comprehensive model specific manual complete with schematics, so they are out there.

Unfortunately on a boat built in the '80's, if there was ever such a manual it is likely lost forever. There is a remote chance that someone else with the same boat managed to hang on to theirs, but it is a long shot!

Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk
 

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Aspiring Boat Bum
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I have the original manuals that came with my Pearson and they did include some very useful wiring information. Did not show where any of the wires were physically located but did show the wiring configuration, color codes, etc. but only for the engine, the gauge and switch panel and charging system. Nothing at all for the AC/DC main electric panel, pumps, lights, refrigeration, or any of the other systems on the boat. If you plan on major wiring I found a cheap wire tracing tool from Harbor Freight very useful.
 

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Barquito
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A manual may help, but, I think you will just be stuck trying to figure out what you have now, anyway. Then you just need to decide if what you have is how you want it. That is my experience, anyway.
 

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Aspiring Boat Bum
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A manual may help, but, I think you will just be stuck trying to figure out what you have now, anyway. Then you just need to decide if what you have is how you want it. That is my experience, anyway.
Absolutely. For an older boat there is no telling what any PO has done and changed so any original wiring diagrams may be useful or not. The wiring on my boat was a bit of a nightmare. Maybe that's why the PO installed 2-3 fire extinguishers in every cabin.
 

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Master Mariner
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So far, I've been able to find every manual for every piece of mechanical gear I want online. Some are free and some aren't but they are there.
Not so for electronics, even some like our Aldren Marinefax TRIV, which I would have thought would be easy, and something called a Stoner Dymek DA100D, which I'm not even sure what it is.
 

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Aspiring Boat Bum
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So far, I've been able to find every manual for every piece of mechanical gear I want online. Some are free and some aren't but they are there.
Not so for electronics, even some like our Aldren Marinefax TRIV, which I would have thought would be easy, and something called a Stoner Dymek DA100D, which I'm not even sure what it is.
Some advise. If you have any stoners on board keep an eye on them. They tend to eat everything in the galley.

I was curious as to what kind of stoner you have so asked Mr Google. Apparently it is some kind of active receiver system for signals 500 kHz to 30 MHzhttps://www.universal-radio.com/catalog/sw_ant/DA100D.html

Falls well below AIS and VHF signals so not sure what it would cover on a boat. That band includes AM broadcast, CB, some ham and marine SSB bands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yeah I have manuals (original and downloaded) for electronics and mechanical components. Been going through the boat the last couple of days and I have resolved myself to the idea that I will be figuring out the wiring on my own. Very doable and at the very least it ensures that I know where and what is going on electrically w the boat.
 

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We are the second owners of our Columbia 45 and the original owner ( and his son) kept every manual, receipt and spec sheet for just about everything aboard. The original Columbia owners manual has the schematics for the plumbing, electrical, Deck Hardware, Prop sizing, and rigging. The original stove/oven manual was helpful for replacement dimensions. The BalMar autopliot manual is invaluable since the firm is no longer around, The instruments are obsolete but functioning so, with Navionics on the IPad and IPhone near shore navigation is practical and less expensive than a full suite of display and sensors that will be obsolete next year regardless.
I completely rewired and repowered our former Columbia 36 ( previous Sailnet User Name Old Columbia) as well as replaced the ports and hatches so the expense and time involved is no longer appealing. My philosophy is, "if it ain't broke, wait til it is." unless it's a life/safety component.
Even with the manuals, the parts and availability of 1972 suppliers is questionable. Better off with salvage/consignment shops for second hand newer technology. The 12V system and 110AC are not rocket science because of their simplicity and size and a Perkins diesel can be rebuilt by shade tree mechanics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
We are the second owners of our Columbia 45 and the original owner ( and his son) kept every manual, receipt and spec sheet for just about everything aboard. The original Columbia owners manual has the schematics for the plumbing, electrical, Deck Hardware, Prop sizing, and rigging. The original stove/oven manual was helpful for replacement dimensions. The BalMar autopliot manual is invaluable since the firm is no longer around, The instruments are obsolete but functioning so, with Navionics on the IPad and IPhone near shore navigation is practical and less expensive than a full suite of display and sensors that will be obsolete next year regardless.
I completely rewired and repowered our former Columbia 36 ( previous Sailnet User Name Old Columbia) as well as replaced the ports and hatches so the expense and time involved is no longer appealing. My philosophy is, "if it ain't broke, wait til it is." unless it's a life/safety component.
Even with the manuals, the parts and availability of 1972 suppliers is questionable. Better off with salvage/consignment shops for second hand newer technology. The 12V system and 110AC are not rocket science because of their simplicity and size and a Perkins diesel can be rebuilt by shade tree mechanics.
Thanks for the feedback. I am planning on some re-wiring this winter and some interior work to bring it up to more modern standards/look. There are a few legacy items in the boat that will come out.
 
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