SailNet Community banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The tartan 30 I bought this year has a newly sealed and painted bottom. The surveyor told me that when I go to paint to just go right over the old coat. Do I need to clean first and with what? No sanding at all or what? Also It is sitting in a cradle and I'm not sure on how to get the spots where the jackstands are or near the bottom of the keel. Appreciate any advice. Also how much paint would I need and how much does it cost?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
625 Posts
Paint is expensive $120 a gal is the cheapest and you can spend a lot more depending on what your needs are. I paint every year, the new paint are made to ware off, so build up in not an issue with these cheaper paints. Some paints are made to last for years so they do not need to he hauled out in locations the hauling is not needed. These people still need to have the scum cleaned off. You need to know what is on your boat now.

Yes clean, and yes sand. I use a Black and Decker orbital sander with 8 holes for dust pick up. In RI it is required to use a vacuum and or contain dust. Also best to get one of those Tyvek jump suit, you can get at Home Depot or Lowes to protect yourself. And gloves also respirator or particle mask.

On the spots you can't get to, the yard that puts your boat in should have paint to touch up. I leave them a small amount of paint and disposable brush to do the touch ups. Ask them, they will tell you.

And last...how much paint. I buy the gal. and it lasts like 3 years. Use a 1/4 nap roller cover with a short 24" long handle on the frame so you can use two hands. Add a brushing thinner to the paint to get the paint to stay wet longer and spread farther. You only want a thin smooth coat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
What about sanding the sealer off. I was told that it was good for the life of the boat. I would hate to sand into that. I think it has vc17 on it now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
625 Posts
Light sanding, it does not take much time. And yes, be careful not to go through to the barrier coat. Sometimes it is necessary to sand through the primer if you have blisters. You should be ready to touch the primer up as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
after reading up on the issue a little more I am now worried about paint flying on my neighbors boats. they are real close together. Probably less than a foot apart at the beam. I want to get in soon so I dont want to have to wait for them. I guess just tape up a tarp to their boat before I start ha? Also Are you saying that I have a seal coat and a primer coat, then the vc17?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I have two good respirators as I used to do alot of painting. I think all vc17 goes on gold. then turns blue or something in the water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
215 Posts
Here is my opinion on the matter. VC17 will do just fine with a light "scuffing" with 3M pad as shown.

You do not need to use an orbital sander, it is overkill. Just spray down the surface and scuff it with the scotch bright pad and then thoroughly rinse it to get all residue off. Then, after it has completely dried, tape your water line with blue painters tape. If you are using VC17 (which is primarily a great lakes coating) it dries very quickly. You can just roll it with a roller for flat finishes (1/4 is what I use.) Pour out smaller amounts into your roller tray at a time as the stuff evaporates and dries out very quickly. The coating you are applying is very thin. Don't think of it like painting your walls at home but more like priming a metal post before applying the enamel. I usually roll out a section at a time covering areas that are about 3x4 feet in area.
As far as painting under the pad the stuff dries so quickly you just hit those spots when the boat is lifted into the sling for launch. In about 5 minutes the paint will be dry enough to hit the water.

If you already have VC17 on the boat you do not have to barrier and seal-coat before the VC17 goes on. The boat will already have the barrier coat on it. You are just putting a buildup on the existing VC17 as it falls off over the season by design. If you have blisters and or flaking barrier coat that is a different story.
!!!ALWAYS WEAR A RESPIRATOR WHEN WORKING WITH THESE COATINGS. THEY HAVE COPPER AND OTHER NASTY STUFF WHEN AIRBORNE IN FINE PARTICULATES!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
VC-17 is pretty easy to work with. Its a very thin paint so it really never builds up too badly. All we usually do is a light power wash in the fall when we pull the boat, and then in the spring we do a light scuffing and then roll on another coat. We are in cooler water and sail the boat quite a bit so we hardly ever get any slime buildup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,052 Posts
Ditto on using a Scotchpad on vc17. I prefer to use it wet, either by dipping it in a bucket of water now and then, or hosing the bottom of the boat. No sense in exposing yourself to any copper dust...the water keeps it out of the air and your lungs.

When it comes time to apply another coat of vc17, of course you'll find plenty of into here on Sailnet. The beauty of vc17, as another poster pointed out in this thread, is that vc17 can be applied very thin, and therefore you avoid buildup. After years and years of applying vc17, you can still have a nice, smooth bottom without a bunch of buildup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
I won't comment on the painting portion because it has been covered nicely already. As far as painting under the stands.......move/ reposition them one set at a time. It won't fall over, just loosen and move enough to expose the bare spot.

Peter
 

·
Tartan 27' owner
Joined
·
5,242 Posts
Since your T30 is on a cradle with only 4 supports the above idea should be done by using an additional jack stand/boat jack to support the hull where you have lowered the cradle supports; one at a time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
215 Posts
Since your T30 is on a cradle with only 4 supports the above idea should be done by using an additional jack stand/boat jack to support the hull where you have lowered the cradle supports; one at a time.
I would suggest that you make sure to chain the stand to the cradle top and bottom just to make sure you don't get a shift. I like to err on the side of caution and over engineering. That being said Caleb's idea is good if you are comfortable with it and have a good stand.
 

·
Registered
Tartan 37
Joined
·
5,287 Posts
Keep in mind that many marinas do not want you to move the jack stands yourself they can do it for you its all insurance related if I recall correctly
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I doubt the guy would care or even know about it. He is rarely there. I could get another jack stand. but really the boat should be fine on three stands for a few minutes? It actually has a v shaped support in front also so there are technically five stands. There are alot of power boats around here that are just on a middle block with two stands in the back and nothing in the front.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Don't go with just 3 points holding the boat.

From your pics I see you have vc17 it only takes a couple of hours to do , save it till the spring. like others have said just scuff the surface apply in thin coats (probably 1 to 1 1/2 cans) save some so when you go to launch, when the yard picks the boat up it only takes 5 min to scuff the 4 pad areas and quickly paint and another 10 min to dry. Most yards understand this and allow time for you to do it .
also the bottom (under side)of the keel may be a grounding point & should not be painted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,979 Posts
Fellow posters who are reading this with the same original question (type) in mind please take note.

We (sail net folks) can help only if we know enough about your boat stuff to help.

The original response was (essentially) sand it off and repaint - a very good answer to someone with 5 layers of unablated ablative paint and barnacle stubs and such.

A very very bad answer to someone with VC17 and a barrier coat and that's it.
 

·
Registered
Tartan 37
Joined
·
5,287 Posts
I doubt the guy would care or even know about it. He is rarely there. I could get another jack stand. but really the boat should be fine on three stands for a few minutes? It actually has a v shaped support in front also so there are technically five stands. There are alot of power boats around here that are just on a middle block with two stands in the back and nothing in the front.
Perhaps not, well until a boat falls because someone moved the stands incorrectly. I wouldn't want someone reading this thread to think its okay to move their jack stands without checking with the marina office first. "The guy" may not care, but the person whom owns the boat near yours might care? Its a presumptuous to think otherwise IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
I agree. As I already stated. Even with the extensive rigging experience I have that I would not even think of moving the stands myself. :confused:
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top