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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking for advice that people might have for my future as a liveaboard. My first step is to find a boat. I am thinking a good size for me is around 30 to 34 ft. I am a 25 year old male with not much money. I know that throws up red flags when it comes to boat ownership, but I always find enough money. I am crafty and simple. I have my eye on a Alberg 30 that needs a lot of interior work. I'm a wood worker so I plan on doing most of the rebuilding/refinishing myself. I am not in a hurry, but am saving up to eventually set sail and see the world. Any advice on reinforcing a smaller boat like that for blue water would be great.
 

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Find the boat that is in good shape (hull and rigging) first and foremost. Forget sailing the world stuff right now. As for the rest, hang around here and enjoy yourself. Feel free to ask away.

It is a noble dream. Nothing wrong with it. Let no one tell you different.

- CD
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply. Any advice on 30' boats that could be better than others for living on(inside layout, space, head/shower)?
 

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Don't turn back :) 30' is just enough, but a lot depends on displacement, as you probably know. I wouldn't bother with a shower on a 30' as it would consume too much space, there are other ways to wash. As for the toilet, we love our bucket, my second choice would be porta potty. Less wholes in your boat, less things to break.
Do you know Retire Onto A Sailboat Ton's of useful information collected from people, no one sided opinions.
Have you read the Pardeys? You might not want to sail without an engine and electricity, but they have lot of useful tricks how to stay afloat with limited budget.
We are fixing our 30' footer with a very limited budget ourselves, also greenhorns ;)
 

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I am most knowledgeable of 36+ foot boats for LA, versus under. My knowledge is not based upon firsthand at that size range.

Go to the boat buying section and put in a thread. Be very detailed. Tell Sailingdog to be nice!!!

- CD
 

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Actually, your FIRST step should be finding a place to keep your new boat; probably the hardest part of the process.
 

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The thought of someone just getting started brings a smile to my face. I don't know how much sailing experience you have, but I'll give you the same advice we give everyone. Read everything you can get your hands on about sailing, cruising and living aboad. Living Aboard Magazine has some really good articles, as do the more established magazines, but I'm partial to Living Aboard. Go to your local marinas and boat clubs. Talk to sailors and offer to crew. You'll garner a lot of information and hopefully have the opportunity get on some boats that might be of interest to you. It's a good way to start targeting a 'do-able' size for you and let you know what you like and dislike on a boat. You'll also hear about some good deals on boats that are being sold.

Good Luck

Loree
Aboard SeaWolf
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I am planning to put the boat in my back yard while I work on it so all of my tools, and the boat, are handy. I just don't know how to get it there if I find one without a trailer. I'm sure I can get it moved there but I can't imagine how much that costs, probably a small fortune.
 

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Alberg 30 is a great boat that definitely is capable of taking you anywhere and would be fun to learn to sail on in the meantime. Interior that needs work is no big deal, especially if you have tools. You would probably end up re-doing all the previous owner's work anyway so why pay for it?

Like CD said, get a good hull and rig (and I would add good sails- they are expensive) and go from there. A30's are very affordable but you'll never find one with a trailer. At that size you will have to find a boat transporter and pay to have it hauled home. You can save a lot of money by devising a way to raise and lower the mast with help of beer drinking friends. Good luck.
 

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You are never better off reinforcing a coastal boat to make it ready for blue water. Too much to do.
Instead, buy an older but real blue water boat and use your skills to fix the stuff that needs fixing. Money and time better spent!
See the bluewater boat list sticky thread at the top of the buying a boat thread for suitable choices.
 
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