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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good morning All,
I am looking around and wanted to try to start planning for a future delivery. I would lke to have a captain transport a 28' Bristol sailboat from MD to GA. I am still planning the trip but so far I am seeing a 28 day to 8 week trip down the ICW. Is this an accurate estimate on how long it would take. Would going down the outside of the coast be any better wind wise or travel time. I have a large keel of 5'3" and about 2,800 LBS. Is there any suggestions on what I need or should have onboard for the trip. I am still a beginner so if more information is needed please let me know.
Thank you for your time and assistance.
Johnny and Ol Blu
 

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Good morning All,
I am looking around and wanted to try to start planning for a future delivery. I would lke to have a captain transport a 28' Bristol sailboat from MD to GA. I am still planning the trip but so far I am seeing a 28 day to 8 week trip down the ICW. Is this an accurate estimate on how long it would take. Would going down the outside of the coast be any better wind wise or travel time. I have a large keel of 5'3" and about 2,800 LBS. Is there any suggestions on what I need or should have onboard for the trip. I am still a beginner so if more information is needed please let me know.
Thank you for your time and assistance.
Johnny and Ol Blu
28 DAYS from MD to GA?:confused:

The distance is roughly 600 miles. Assuming a conservative 40nm/day it should take no more than 15 days. This should be an easy trip. Even with your 5.3' draft, the ICW would be a logical choice for a delivery with a new to you boat.
 
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Moot point if you already own the boat.. but if not.. why don't you look closer to home? It would be money that can go towards a boat you find there rather then spend it to move it so far.
jus sayin...
 

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'cuz he wants to help the economy, and hire me to bring his boat to GA...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Actually already own the boat, currently stationed as military in Maryland and will be transitioning out in May. I am hopeing to head home to GA but the time frame was making me nervous 15 days sounds a lot more reasonable thankyou eherlihy that is a relief.
 

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Just as a reference I brought my 34 Sabre from Annapolis to St Pete Fl leaving End of October and took 32 days. We had several 2 day stops for weather but generally were pushing pretty hard. We anchored or got slips every night except one.

ICW all the way to Hilton head then outside direct to Fernandino beach. You should figure a max of 50 mi / day and always plan out your next day including stopping point the day before.

Good luck, its a fun trip that you can do with a friend and enjoy.
 

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Johnny,

You will miss a great 'experience developing opportunity' if you stay inside. Near to shore there is often a south-going-counter-current and you can make good time with a fair wind and the occasional overnight passage.

Pick the entries, exits and weather carefully and you will be a good sailor by the time you get to GA.

Good Luck Phil
 

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You may average about 5 kts during daylight hours but be held up at some bridges and the locks. The crossing on Albemarle is 25 miles and should leave early am. But generally with good weather you should average about 75 miles per day--perhaps get some 100 mile days in May-July if you push hard. 2-3 weeks should do it especially if you do some offshore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Captain44,
I got your message but can not respond yet. I got the idea from a few old timers on the boats around my marina. I could always use more lessons so much to learn and prep for, but money is a main issue for me. I do not have an autopilot, is that able to be installed on a tiller or does it matter. What size charts would you recommend (scale wise). Thank you


YorkSailor, It does sound like a great trip the only worry I have was the time frame i was attempting to set up a job for as soon as I can. I orginally had the idea of following the off shore line all the way down since I have a deep keel but questioned that because i am not seasoned.
 

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johnny-
I'd expect hiring a captain for two weeks, even at $100 a day (lowball) would run you $1500 and since you may be motoring all the way, conservatively $300? worth of fuel, plus marina fees every night or most nights...if money is a concern, it might break even or work out cheaper to have the boat trucked down, which would take just a day.

Going offshore should be faster and cheaper but that can mean waiting for a weather window, offshore prep, and other issues as well. Not that boats belong on trucks, just that if you have doubts or restraints on this, trucking may not be an unreasonable way to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I considered trucking it down and still leaning towards that but cannot find a company around here and haven’t been able to find any recommendations. The 5'3" keel is seeming to be nice but difficult to accommodate.

I even looked around to see if I could rent a Trailer and find someone with a heavy duty truck. Is there any known companies out there to point me in the right direction for that route.
 

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5'3" really IS a shoal keel, to most of us. Shouldn't be a problem for any company that transports sailboats. Would be a problem for any yoyo with a truck who calls himself a mover, but isn't insured or licensed for the job. Renting a real boat trailer for a keelboat? Wouldn't be easy.

Now if you can find a Chinook crew and convince them that they need a heavy lift exercise...
 

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Trying to do it all on the cheap with experience is one thing...but trying to do it on the cheap without experience is a recipe for a costly enterprise or disaster. I've seen this way too many times on online boating forums. The questions you ask are so basic and simple and the answers are so easily found online or in manufacturer's sites (can a tiller use autopilot? What size charts?) that I highly suggest you either plan to invest a lot of money in hiring professionals (and $100 per day for a pro captain is very, very low) or mechanics or boatyards, but I would guess that you bought an older boat for a really, really great deal (??) and yet you thought a 600 mile trip on the icw would take 28 days? Are you willing to learn from your experience or really get the advantage of someone else's experience? That will cost you and you have already made it clear that money is the main issue. A deep keel (5'3" is deep--to some yes but not to others) is less of an issue that your readiness and that of the boat--and I'll bet neither are ready. When you run into a buoy or run hard aground or get caught with a rope in your prop....or worse..much worse, perhaps you will then realize why it is not wise to learn from your experience--though it can be done. But no experience and no money? Not a good idea....and even if you are a good mechanic., well coordinated, go slowly and use common sense, there is so much to know to do it safely and comfortably and a 28' boat cannot go as fast or take as much (meaning you too) than a larger boat.
 
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