SailNet Community banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The wife and I are looking at a 1995 Hunter 29.5 for our first sailboat. We plan to use it in Percy Priest lake in Nashville tn. This will be the first sailboat and we are interested in two things.

Is is a good first boat to learn the ins and outs of sailing (forgiving) and are there any known issues we should look for in this specific boat.

We will be getting inspections on the boat once we find "The one". Do you recommend a separate inspection for the rigging, the boat and the engine?

Thanks
brad
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
141 Posts
Is this the one your talking about ?HUNTER 29.5 sailboat specifications and details on sailboatdata.com
Hunter has some varied rigs , some better than others I would guess . This one has a interesting forstay /head sail set up . It seems to to have a smaller head sail, I think that will make it a little more docile to handle . Also if it were me I would put the main sheet on the bridge . The little sprit looks nice too . But why limit yourself to just a Hunter(I'm not saying it would be a bad choice). As for your survey yes by all means separate inspections are good . Also I think it would be a great first boat . Not to small not to big . Good luck !
 

·
first sailed january 2008
Joined
·
1,409 Posts
I like the mid-80's Hunter 31 for Nashville lake sailing and all around cruising comfort. But they may not have that one for sail there. Get it? Pretty funny huh?

Looking at yours....I don't know. Didn't build quality suffer in the 90's-2000's?

In Washington, I met a guy that sailed up the Washington coast from Portland. On one hand, he made it to almost to Port Angeles, which is good, but he had a fiberglass rudder post and broke his rudder and had to be towed in in the Strait Of Fuca.

I'm no expert, but the fact that they would make a rudder post out of fiberglass just seems off. I would get a Catalina if I were you.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
17,467 Posts
We love our Hunter. They are really great boats. And they are typically set up to be pretty easy to sail (especially the newer ones). So I don't see how you could go wrong.

Definitely get a survey. And I wouldn't necessarily schedule a separate rigging inspection unless your surveyor recommends it (as ours did). Same thing with the engine. If you get a good surveyor (find your own, don't use one the broker recommends) - you will be in very good hands.

Here's our story.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
571 Posts
I'm guessing Percy Priest and Guntersville have similar conditions. What I've learned about sailing in Guntersville is that the small boats go out more than the bigger boats (Hunter 29.5 = bigger). I don't know why, but I guess it's because the winds are usually light. After making this observation, I purchased a 19' boat. I'm often the only boat out or one of three or four. I'm learning how to sail; the folks with big boats are...making payments?

Also, Percy Priest has fairly small reaches. I imagine there will be a lot of tacking. I don't know how well the Hunter tacks, especially in light wind.

My recommendation is to go to the lake and see which boats are out sailing, then get a similar one.
 

·
HANUMAN
Joined
·
2,838 Posts
I chartered a 29.5 in Thailand. Very roomy and comfortable layout. I would not call it forgiving. The fractional rig does help but learn to reef the main in all kinds of conditions.

I can't comment on build or quality.

The aft cabin was comfortable :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the info smack. I have probably read hundreds of your posts as well as the journey with your hunter. I know a lot of people do not like hunters for some reason or another buy I happen to like what I have seen in person and the things I have read about them, plus the wife has agreed to 29.5 or the hunter 356 (not a size boat I am willing to jump into yet mainly to experience cost over time)..... For now.

We have looked at many other boats and we just keep coming back to this particular boat. The main things at this time I really require are a deisel engine and less than 30ft which narrows the options out of the gate. There is also a chance we may use it in old hickory lake which is really a river.

Since this is our first sailboat I have been a little anxious about what to by and I don't want to wait much longer to start putting offers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,547 Posts
should be a fine boat, and a decent survey will steer you towards specific areas that may need additional surveys (engine and rigging).

It is a great boat to learn on, perhaps a little big to start out on, I learned more about wind and sails with 20 footers, but the Hunter will do fine and still give you a place to sit and eat and play and grow.

No real issues other than age and whether it has been on PPL (freshwater) it's entire life or was it brought there from salt water location?

Although my son lived off Bell Road and is now near Vanderbilt, we have only visited the lake once or twice as I miss the Chesapeake every time we go. Lake sailing can be a challenge with lot;s of skis and power boats, more likely house boats and party barges there on PPL.

Enjoy!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
17,467 Posts
Thanks for the info smack. I have probably read hundreds of your posts as well as the journey with your hunter. I know a lot of people do not like hunters for some reason or another buy I happen to like what I have seen in person and the things I have read about them, plus the wife has agreed to 29.5 or the hunter 356 (not a size boat I am willing to jump into yet mainly to experience cost over time)..... For now.

We have looked at many other boats and we just keep coming back to this particular boat. The main things at this time I really require are a deisel engine and less than 30ft which narrows the options out of the gate. There is also a chance we may use it in old hickory lake which is really a river.

Since this is our first sailboat I have been a little anxious about what to by and I don't want to wait much longer to start putting offers.
No worries dude. As you may know, we started out on a C27 - which was a great boat to learn on. It was big enough to feel like a real sailboat, but small enough to keep us out of real trouble. I think the 29 is a perfect size to start in general. BUT...

I will say this, which will probably buy me some flack: If the wife likes the bigger boat, I'd do that in a heartbeat - even though it's your first boat. The key is to make sure the wife enjoys it. If she does - you are golden.

Find an experienced sailor to go out with you the first few times so you guys can get the feel of things (and ask her to let you drive a little). The scariest thing, at least for me, is always docking. But you'll be just as scared with 6 fewer feet. And you will learn to handle whatever boat you get anyway.

For us, the key was to ONLY go out in mellow conditions until you've got it wired, then gradually start moving into stiffer winds. And as RobG says, REEF! That's the most important thing to learn as you start sailing in sportier conditions. Do it far sooner than you should, and far more deeply than you should, then you'll find that balance for your boat.

Being on a lake is forgiving. You don't have to worry about big waves - so you can just focus on how the boat behaves in the wind. That's a huge advantage. And you'll learn to tack and gybe your boat like nobody's business.

Anyway, as you know, I love Hunters (as well as many other boats). They are a tremendous value. Let the chuckleheads yap about whatever they want to - you'll be out sailing in a fast, comfy boat at a great price.

Enjoy.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top