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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings,

I have a Loran installed and working on my boat... Does it go or does it stay?

Curious to see how many of you have them and or use them.
I have googled but have not found much relevant information aside from the CG blurbs.
What is its future ?, is it worth keeping on board ?
I have a plotter, 2 handheld gps, laptop prgm/gps and paper charts compass etc.

Any thoughts ?...................
 

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Vikingsailor
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Our boat too, has a Loran C receiver...and I plan to keep it. It's not that I'm paranoid...oh, wait...yes I am.

2 unrelated sources, producing close to the same thing (Lat & Long)....

Plus, paper charts for triple redundancy.

Now, if only the sky doesn't fall...
 

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If it works and you know how to use it and the system in your area is maintained, sure, keep it...unless you need the space or can't spare the volts.

But I was offered a relatively new unit for free a couple of years ago, and said no thank you.
 

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Owner, Green Bay Packers
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Loran C has become the official USCG back up plan for GPS. On the brink of shutting the system down, it is speculated that someone posited the idea that it might be nice to have an electronic navigation system to use during those periods of time when the DoD decided it necessary to shut the GPS system down. Consideration of those circumstances grew out of 9/11 and homeland security needs.

If you're sailing the Gulf, and not going over a couple hundred miles offshore, Loran C might serve you quite well. It's primarily a near-offshore system and as accurate as you really need for that type of navigation.

If I had a Loran C set, I'd certainly keep it and probably even use it. I definitely wouldn't get rid of it now that it looks like the system will be maintained for the foreseeable future.
 

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Just to add to this: They are now coming out with Loran/GPS combined units for Navigation that connects to your chart plotter.
Loran C is being upgraded to eLoran, going from the old tube transmitters to solid state transmitters.
The Aeronautical industry along with the Maritime industry had a big input into keeping the Loran going. A lot of aircraft has Loran for their navigation also.
 

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My current boat came with one. I punted it off almost before I did anything else (it was huge!). The Smithsonian did not express an interest so it was off to a landfill for it. I am strictly coastal on my boat and I figure if the GPS system goes down, I'll probably have bigger issues to ponder. I have a chartplotter and a backup handheld for navigation.
 

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Plus, paper charts for triple redundancy.
I wouldn't describe paper charts as a "redundancy". Loran C (and some GPS receivers, like mine) only tell you where you are... not how close the nearest reef is.
 

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Splashed
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Loran C has become the official USCG back up plan for GPS. On the brink of shutting the system down, it is speculated that someone posited the idea that it might be nice to have an electronic navigation system to use during those periods of time when the DoD decided it necessary to shut the GPS system down. Consideration of those circumstances grew out of 9/11 and homeland security needs.
Out of academic interest, as I’m not really worried about this, but here goes..
So they (USCG) must have made a risk assessment? Do you know what they gauge the probability of GPS being shutdown to?
That would be interesting to know, as the Galileo (European GPS) project’s business case is based on the premise that the military operators give no guarantees on uptime. ESA - Navigation - The future - Galileo - Why Europe needs Galileo
A figure on probability indirectly gives us an idea on uptime (still not guaranteed though) :)
(Bringing a sextant and some tables still won’t hurt you). :D
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I did see the combo gps/loran unit but for the price and have all your eggs in one basket did not make sense.
Fortunately my unit is small and does not take up much space, I have played with it but no serious use (last time using loran and omega was in the late 60s). I have had a problem locking in on signals but usually in port.
So I guess it is a keeper. I understand the loran c will continue to function with new transmiters ??
 

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Thanks Courtney.
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If I had a Loran C set, I'd certainly keep it and probably even use it. I definitely wouldn't get rid of it now that it looks like the system will be maintained for the foreseeable future.
Do you want one???? I've got one I no longer use.
 

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Leadline? I thought I was the only person still using one. Granted it's on a 14' runabout used strictlt for fishing in quite muddy water.
Nope. Sailaway21 uses one too. It was the most useful tool in his arsenal when trying to discover America. Unfortunately, all he found was Michigan.

- CD
 

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Owner, Green Bay Packers
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In a doubtlessly vain attempt to return the thread to rationality, I'd ask what everyone here paid for their GPS units or chartplotters. Since the vast majority of sailing is done in waters covered by Loran C and the OP owns one it would seem that his near-offshore navigation needs are quite well met for the near term future. And he will not have to update the unit periodically as all you conscientious chart-plotter users do, correct?

An hour ago I did not own a Loran set. Now it seems I'm about to acquire one for free. And it will get me across Lake Michigan quite as well as any GPS unit will. I'll also be able to afford other important things with the money otherwise spent, on a recurring basis, on GPS chart updates.

The only person whom might mock the carriage of a lead line would be one whom has never found themselves on an unfamiliar shore with a defunct fathometer in circumstances where they could not afford to remain well offshore.
 

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In a doubtlessly vain attempt to return the thread to rationality, I'd ask what everyone here paid for their GPS units or chartplotters. Since the vast majority of sailing is done in waters covered by Loran C and the OP owns one it would seem that his near-offshore navigation needs are quite well met for the near term future. And he will not have to update the unit periodically as all you conscientious chart-plotter users do, correct?

An hour ago I did not own a Loran set. Now it seems I'm about to acquire one for free. And it will get me across Lake Michigan quite as well as any GPS unit will. I'll also be able to afford other important things with the money otherwise spent, on a recurring basis, on GPS chart updates.

The only person whom might mock the carriage of a lead line would be one whom has never found themselves on an unfamiliar shore with a defunct fathometer in circumstances where they could not afford to remain well offshore.

GPS gives you lat and lon which you reference on a paper chart. What does a Loran give you?

- CD
 

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Owner, Green Bay Packers
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GPS gives you lat and lon which you reference on a paper chart. What does a Loran give you?

- CD
So, you're posting strongly held opinions here with apparently little or no knowledge of how either Loran or a Loran set works? That's uncharacteristically beneath you. Cam is correct in lamenting the demise of red rep.
 

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So, you're posting strongly held opinions here with apparently little or no knowledge of how either Loran or a Loran set works? That's uncharacteristically beneath you. Cam is correct in lamenting the demise of red rep.
My point being that you do not update the GPS EITHER!!! Chartplotter is not comparable to a Loran, a GPS is.

Dad had a Loran on his boat too when he bought it. Want to guess where it is!??

- CD
 
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