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Barquito
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I made my cabin cushions a little thinner that I should have (mostly because I am cheap). I will probably just slide a thin high density foam under the cushion. Wondering if anyone has used multiple density foams built into the cushion. Would be nice and squishy on the top part, and the higher density foam on the bottom would keep you from 'bottoming' out.
 

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We have done it NO PROBLEM!

And it's doing very well after more than a year.
You can see how we did it at our Youtube page at;
New cushions - YouTube

NOTE: I did the video in 3D, but you can turn that off by clicking the small "gear" at the bottom right and select off.

Greg

I made my cabin cushions a little thinner that I should have (mostly because I am cheap). I will probably just slide a thin high density foam under the cushion. Wondering if anyone has used multiple density foams built into the cushion. Would be nice and squishy on the top part, and the higher density foam on the bottom would keep you from 'bottoming' out.
 

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Sailor of Small Waters
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112 Posts
Got a couple of recent updates on my trailer sailer. The first is mast crutches for transport. I tow an hour on the interstate to get to the nearest lake, so safety and security in transit is very important. The trailer had now crutches so I had to fab something. There were several competing requirements - minimal rear overhang, lofting the front of the mast enough to clear the cargo rack (and any cargo) on the roof of my SUV, enough clearance to open the rear hatch with the mast in place, and still being short enough to pass through the garage into my back yard for storage. The last bit - being short while also being tall - was the real head scratcher. I decided to weld up a crutch that kicked backward enough to clear the door and incorporated a hinged topsection that could be folded down to get the trailer through the garage. The whole thing was made from 1" square tube I had lying around. I bought a gate hinge, some 'cold-galvanizing' spray paint, and the knob, so I'm out around $15. The rear crutch is made of scrap wood and metal bits to lock in the gudgeons but bear weight on the transom. Total cost - $0









 
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Sailor of Small Waters
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112 Posts
...and the second weekend project - a tiller tamer. No cost - I made a little jam cleat out of scrap stainless and I'll use the bungee that secures the rear of the mast in transit. Should provide enough control to hold course in case I have to go forward for something or just want to heave to for lunch.



 

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Sailor of Small Waters
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112 Posts

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aka $tingy Sailor
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104 Posts
My latest woodworking project for Summer Dance is this wine glass rack.



It's made from a couple feet of shock cord, some hog rings, and leftover mahogany stained and varnished.

You can find a dimensioned drawing, materials list, and instructions on my blog at this link: Wine glass rack.

For about $4, made the first mate pretty happy ;). You can too and it doesn't take a lot of woodworking skills or tools.
 

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This is a table I built a while back. 24 x 24 inches, 1/2 inch thick Polypropylene Sheet.

Edges are rounded and the top roughed up a bit with coarse sandpaper to give a mat finish

Hangs on the second step and braces off the bottom step.

No fiddles as it is not intended for use underway (well maybe as a nav table but not for eating)

Bit heavier than I wanted but the plastic cleans easy.

For some more pictures and design stuff see the article on my site:

The New Table | Boating Safety Tips, Tricks & Thoughts from Captnmike

sorry can't remember the cost, but under $100.
 

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Nice table. I'm often balancing stuff on my companionway stairs when cooking and can see how a table there would be really helpful.

With a little more work I bet the same tabletop could be the basis for a pedestal table or a companionway table. It's hard to find storage for a piece of plastic that big, so doing double duty would be great.
 

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Thanks

I have been happy with it - you could make it a different size if you want.

I store the table aft on port with the fenders - see the background of the picture - the table top goes to the hull to keep it clean, some of the fenders usually end up going against the bottom of the table when the table is stored
 

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I make sawdust
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29 Posts
Outboard engine stand. Basically free since I already had the 2X4's and wood screws. Built from a set of plans downloaded off the inter webs, and it has a spot to put your gas can, and you can park a rubbermaid tub full of water under the lower end for a test run.



<p><a href="http://vimeo.com/99530334">test run</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/user16531175">Ramble On</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>
 

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I make sawdust
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Nice score on the bronze port lights. We cleaned ours with a soak in Clorox toilet bowl cleaner (the blue kind with HCl, not chlorine). The acidic nature of the cleaner is a bit of a pain to work with, but we wore gloves and safety glasses when scrubbing with a brass brush. After paying $25/ea for new laminated safety glass for 8 oval and 3 round ports on our T37. I'm not sure it qualifies as a "low buck project", but at $3 for a bottle of Clorox, it's a cheap way to remove a whole lot of scale and corrosion from bronze hardware in a real hurry…









I have to crib this a bit in order to qualify for the low buck category. I'm only going to show 10% of the total project. I got ten of these solid bronze opening ports for $60 each. I had to scavenge them from a derelict old cruiser to get them for that price and by the time I was done I already wondered if I had paid too much. :)

The boat I recently bought has plastic deadlights with brass trim rings outside and teak rings inside. I wanted metal opening ports but even brass ones would have cost several boat bucks - bronze ones like these would have been almost as much as I paid for the whole boat plus they would have to come from New Zealand.

It's taken about a full days work each to remove, clean & polish them. That adds up when there are 10 of them to do. I had to start with 220 sandpaper and go up through 320, 400, 600, 800 & 1200 before I could begin buffing but I'm pretty happy with how they came out and especially the deal I got.

They won't go in until next fall or winter.

Before & after pics below.
 

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I make sawdust
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We also use Flitz metal polish every 6 months or so to maintain that "shiny new, straight from the factory" bronze finish. Not bad for bronze ports founded in 1977….
 

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midlife crisis member
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I cut the four holes on the sides of the berths for easier access. There are hatches on top but these are a pain with the cushions and who knows what else on top (sometimes people). I used a 3" hole saw to create the radii and then joined the holes with a thin cut off disk in an angle grinder. Finished it up with some sandpaper to remove sharp edges.

 

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Senior Moment Member
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13,290 Posts
Nice score on the bronze port lights. We cleaned ours with a soak in Clorox toilet bowl cleaner (the blue kind with HCl, not chlorine). The acidic nature of the cleaner is a bit of a pain to work with, but we wore gloves and safety glasses when scrubbing with a brass brush. After paying $25/ea for new laminated safety glass for 8 oval and 3 round ports on our T37. I'm not sure it qualifies as a "low buck project", but at $3 for a bottle of Clorox, it's a cheap way to remove a whole lot of scale and corrosion from bronze hardware in a real hurry…







Are those pics simply before & after the acid bath or did you polish them up after?

Also, where were you when I spent all those days with wire brushes, sandpaper, buffing wheels & metal polish? :mad:;)
 

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Daniel - Norsea 27
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1,258 Posts
Nice score on the bronze port lights. We cleaned ours with a soak in Clorox toilet bowl cleaner (the blue kind with HCl, not chlorine). The acidic nature of the cleaner is a bit of a pain to work with, but we wore gloves and safety glasses when scrubbing with a brass brush. After paying $25/ea for new laminated safety glass for 8 oval and 3 round ports on our T37. I'm not sure it qualifies as a "low buck project", but at $3 for a bottle of Clorox, it's a cheap way to remove a whole lot of scale and corrosion from bronze hardware in a real hurry…

Nice work. ;)

I've used vinegar to clean parts that still turned out well. Those ports of yours now looks brand new.
 

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69' Coronado 25
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323 Posts
I cut the four holes on the sides of the berths for easier access. There are hatches on top but these are a pain with the cushions and who knows what else on top (sometimes people). I used a 3" hole saw to create the radii and then joined the holes with a thin cut off disk in an angle grinder. Finished it up with some sandpaper to remove sharp edges.

You can finish the cut-outs with automotive door edge guard to kkp your hands and arm from rubbing against the fiberglass, it makes a softer edge.
 
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Singlehander by Default
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Like the cutouts. And if you can find a local upholestry shop you the will probably carry that rubberized edge strip that slips on over the edges. They normally sell it by the foot, so you can cut it to exact length insted of trying to piece together door edging to make it fit all the way around. A little dab of glue or sealant in places ans it will stay in place for years.
 
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