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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have gleened more than 1 opinion in research as to whether it is safe,over the long run , to use newer low sulpher on road diesel in an older diesel engine (mine being a 1982 5424 universal). Some claim the sulpher acts a lubicant. Can anybody out there comment with some certainty on this subject? I find it safer to keep track of my engine time and add a measured amount of on road fuel based on usage/gallon per hour than to run the risk of spilling a tiny bit thru the vent that creates a commotion at the fuel dock! The added $ and time of procuring an occasional 5 gallon portable tankfull does not concern me. And I like the idea of keeping fresh fuel and a fullish tank to prevent condensation in cooler months.Any recommendations for proven additives to compensate for less sulpher?
Thanks!
 

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I believe you can still purchase off road diesel with the higher sulfur content at some truck stops and marina's.
 

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Then the reality is, it will really not matter if you run low sulpher vs high sulpher.

The ONLY place you need to really worry about the low sulpher is the rubber seals etc in the injection pumps. Otherwise, no real issues to worry about. I'm running a total of 5 diesel motors from my boat's 85 Yanmar to my 05 GM dmax pickup. I have not had any issues as of yet with the ultra low in my trackhoe, bobcat or IHC dumprtuck either, these three are motors from 92-99.

Also, at least in my area, the on road fuel at the stations is cheaper by .50 per gal than the fuel at the marina!

marty
 

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Tartan 37C
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Don't have an answer on the effects of the low sulpher on older engines, other than the goverment says it has no effect. I take that reassurance with a block of salt seeing it's from the govt.

I find it safer to keep track of my engine time and add a measured amount of on road fuel based on usage/gallon per hour than to run the risk of spilling a tiny bit thru the vent that creates a commotion at the fuel dock!
A slip mate put a Raycor Fuel/Air Separator on his fuel vent line to prevent this from happening on his Catalina and says it works great. I'm planning on adding one during the off season.

http://www.defender.com/product.jsp?path=-1|311|302335|107095|699530&id=133911



Eliminate Fuel Vent Line Overflow During Refueling
Next time you fill up, watch your fuel vent line. A typical refueling will send up to a half gallon or more of fuel spilling overboard. Fuel spillage is not only expensive, it's absolutely deadly to fragile lakes, rivers and waterways. USCG and other regulations prohibit the discharge of oils including civil and criminal penalties.

Installed in the fuel tank vent line, the Racor Fuel/Air Separator efficiently separates air from fuel forced into the line. Air is vented, and all fuel is returned to the tank. The Fuel/Air Separator captures fuel normally discharged due to agitation and thermal expansion up to 2.4 PSI. It also eliminates damage to expensive striping and labels and protects finishes from fuel stains. The unit is maintenance free -- there's nothing to rust or corrode.

The Racor Fuel/Air Separator fits neatly into your vent line, actually replacing a section of the line. One Fuel/Air Separator unit is required for each vent line, both models fit 5/8" vent lines. Fittings are included.

**Mounting Considerations:

* Do not mount or attach the lifeguard unitto the engine or any source of extreme heat
* Ensure the unit will be installed UP, within 60° of vertical
* A 90° elbow is supplied for conveniencve and ease of installation. All fittings are interchangable.

Specifications:

4 inches D x 9-3/4 inches L
Max air flow: 17 CFM
Thermal expansion: up to 2.4 PSI
Vent line size: 5/8"
 

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ancient mariner
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i would never use high sulpher fuel in a diesel. the blow by that gets by the piston rings & gets down in the oil creates sulpheric acid which is bad for bearings and other engine parts.
 

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If you're worried about it, Marvel Mystery Oil makes a good substitute. Something like 3 oz. to 20 gallons. I'm sure there are other additives of a similar nature.
 

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New Zealand switched to low slphur diesel about a year ago and there have been some complaints from older vehicle owners about leaking diesel from injector pumps. The seals apparently don't like it, I don't know the cause but I know that many vehicles come thru the place where I worked and failed their certificate of fitness inspections because of fuel leaks.

I also heard from a dieel technician that the older radial type pumps (DPA) were more succeptable to problems than the Bosch type pumps.

Unfortunately only heresay. My Yanmar has not noticed the difference.
 

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I'm using a diesel additive from Stanadyne. Diesel Fuel Additives - Stanadyne

I’ve been using it for years in a 1985 Peugeot Diesel; others more knowledgeable than me recommend it because of injection pump lubrication issues. Don’t know if the Yanmar needs it or not, but I figure why take the chance.
 

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2-cycle motor oil like for a motorcycle. I have used it with no noticable effects. Of course a little more or less engine wear is not easily detected. This is fertile ground for the snake oil salesmen.
 

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Well,
Unckle Sam said it was ok for my trucks...So i will not comment on why he has not done a study since MANDATING IT...:D

The meck"s arond here love low sulf......They are currantly busy with inj. and pumps and top end jobs on the older trucks....

Advice is run a additive{snakeoil} like Howes.......

Howes Lubricator
My Thoughts
mark
 
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