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I have a Contest 30 with the mast in a tabernacle. The mast would go down towards the stern. How many people do I need to do this? Would the the sidestays need to be loosened? Do I need to use a boom or something extended foward horizontally from the mast for leverage? Thanks for any help.
P.s. She is still on jack stands.
 

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I don t know about a contest but on our nor''sea 27 we use the boom as a fulcrum and attach cables from the end of the boom to the middle upper shroud and from padeyes on the caprails near the cockpit to the same place on the shrouds. using a long main sheet, with the aft lower shroud off, and the back stay off, we lower the mast foreward. The cables keep the mast from swaying side to side. it is a very efficent system. one person can do it. the mast and boom together weigh over 150 200 lbs and is 30 feet off the deck. Make sure you have someone to check on you shrouds as they tend to hang up on things. remove everything you don''t need to lower it and lable it first.good luck. bob
 

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Nor'sea 27 mast raising/lowering

bfomenko,

I'm brand new to SailNet, and just picked up this old thread on mast raising/lowering, and wanted to ask you some questions. I'm assuming, of course, that you still own your Nor'sea. I'm researching the Nor'Sea as a viable 'trailerable' boat that offers flexibility in terms of where I might take it; I like what it has to offer in terms of size, draft, amenities and so forth.

My concerns, as I read about the mast system, revolve around single-handing and raising the rig myself. How do you handle the cantilevering of the mast as it was slid out over the bow pulpit? Did you have some kind of roller setup on the pulpit? Is it difficult to keep the foot of the mast under control, to hinge it at the step, with so much projecting over the bow? It seems to me that a 35' mast reaching out that far would make stepping it somewhat of a challenge. As for raising the mast alone, did you use a winch so that you could stop at any point to check shrouds and running rigging? I read your description of how you rigged the boom and shrouds. It sounds a lot like other info I've come across.

Any resources that you can point me to, online or otherwise (videos, step-by-step photos, etc.), would be helpful.
 

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Telstar 28
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James—

First, it is pretty unlikely that BFOMENKO will reply as his last post was in 2001.

Second, it depends on what you mean by trailerable. The NorSea 27 is not a trailerable boat by most standard definitions as it does generally require a travel lift to move it from the trailer to the water and a back. While the Norsea 27 can be moved by a trailer, can be stored on a trailer, it really doesn't qualify as a trailerable boat, especially since it weighs in at over 9000 lbs. for the boat with equipment and the trailer adds another 2000 lbs or so...making the entire rig about 11-12000 lbs.

As for stepping and unstepping the mast. If you're planning on using the boom as a ginpole, you would have to lower the mast forwards, and that would leave an extremely long section of the mast hanging off the bow.

If you have a sturdy enough tabernacle setup at the mast step, you can usually rig an A-frame to act as a gin-pole to raise the mast with. Depending on where the shrouds terminate in relation to the mast step, you may need to add guy lines to keep the mast centered as you raise it, and this should be easier to setup than trying to raise it using the boom as a gin pole, since the mast can be more easily handled by supporting it using a boom crutch or gallows in the cockpit.
 

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I hadn't read that about launching the 27. Sounds more difficult and complex than what I've been able to find online, and I can't recall anyone ever mentioning the requirement of a travel lift. I might look at other smaller boats, then - I've read some good things about the ComPac 23, except for its windward abilities. I'm looking for a boat that can handle coastal cruising, and take on a good bit of wind, without the hassle of moorage; hence, the trailer idea.
 

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The near 4' draft of the Norsea 27, combined with the full keel makes it really tough to trailer launch.
 

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I hadn't read that about launching the 27. Sounds more difficult and complex than what I've been able to find online, and I can't recall anyone ever mentioning the requirement of a travel lift. I might look at other smaller boats, then - I've read some good things about the ComPac 23, except for its windward abilities. I'm looking for a boat that can handle coastal cruising, and take on a good bit of wind, without the hassle of moorage; hence, the trailer idea.
Dunno why SD didn't mention it, but could you dry-sail it where you are?? Lots of people do that over here with boats up to 30'. That way you don't have the hassle of mooring and you get to leave the mast up.

All you need is a couple of lifting points fitted to the top of the keel (in the bilge) and a dock-side crane at the yacht club..
 

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Dunno why SD didn't mention it, but could you dry-sail it where you are?? Lots of people do that over here with boats up to 30'. That way you don't have the hassle of mooring and you get to leave the mast up.

All you need is a couple of lifting points fitted to the top of the keel (in the bilge) and a dock-side crane at the yacht club..
I doubt many people dry-sail a Norsea 27. There are far better boats to drysail. Also, it takes a pretty beefy crane to handle a Norsea 27, as it weighs in at over 9000 lbs with gear and equipment IIRC.
 

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Quirky
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bfomenko,

I'm brand new to SailNet, and just picked up this old thread on mast raising/lowering, and wanted to ask you some questions. I'm assuming, of course, that you still own your Nor'sea. I'm researching the Nor'Sea as a viable 'trailerable' boat that offers flexibility in terms of where I might take it; I like what it has to offer in terms of size, draft, amenities and so forth.

My concerns, as I read about the mast system, revolve around single-handing and raising the rig myself. How do you handle the cantilevering of the mast as it was slid out over the bow pulpit? Did you have some kind of roller setup on the pulpit? Is it difficult to keep the foot of the mast under control, to hinge it at the step, with so much projecting over the bow? It seems to me that a 35' mast reaching out that far would make stepping it somewhat of a challenge. As for raising the mast alone, did you use a winch so that you could stop at any point to check shrouds and running rigging? I read your description of how you rigged the boom and shrouds. It sounds a lot like other info I've come across.

Any resources that you can point me to, online or otherwise (videos, step-by-step photos, etc.), would be helpful.

I'm very unfamiliar with your boat, but I thought I'd offer that perhaps you should look into the mast raising system on a Hunter 260 for ideas? It's a 40 foot mast and the simple system lets you raise it single handed. Some use a winch, but I've put one up without using a winch.
 

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Telstar 28
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I think you're a bit confused. The Hunter 260 DOES NOT HAVE A 40' long mast. I believe the 40' refers to the height above water from the waterline, not from the cabintop. I have a 28' boat and it has a 35' 6" mast. The Hunter 270 has a waterline to masttop height of 39' 9".

I'm very unfamiliar with your boat, but I thought I'd offer that perhaps you should look into the mast raising system on a Hunter 260 for ideas? It's a 40 foot mast and the simple system lets you raise it single handed. Some use a winch, but I've put one up without using a winch.
 

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Quirky
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I think you're a bit confused. The Hunter 260 DOES NOT HAVE A 40' long mast. I believe the 40' refers to the height above water from the waterline, not from the cabintop. I have a 28' boat and it has a 35' 6" mast. The Hunter 270 has a waterline to masttop height of 39' 9".

Okay, so say it's about 34-35', close enough to what James' mast might be that looking into that system might bring some ideas. :rolleyes:
 

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I have always preferred and on deck pole (20' in my case)stabilized from 3 points

1. Bow 2. and 3. some place strong on the deck we use the stanchions lead to the winches and have a 4:1 or greater block and tackle like a boom vang or main sheet setup to lift with enough line

This has always allowed finger tip control and the ability to do my keel stepped mast which is a PITA because you have to use more lift so it can be lowered to the step below deck

Now its cake on the J24 as the whole deal only weights 75 pounds i am really on the fence with the Cal 29 as the weight and consequences of a mistake are pretty large in personal injury and boat damage and it would take a serious capital investment to do it as my J24 stuff is way to small
 

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Weight of the boat, in my opinion, isn't that big of an issue as long as you have the tow vehicle for it.

I recently had a good 18k pound boat/trailer behind my truck and didn't have any issues with it. We hopped on the scale and we were right at 26k pounds total. As long as your tow vehicle and trailer are setup for what you're doing its fine.

Obviously my truck isn't stock and is well equipped for towing such large loads (though i'm ashamed to admit we were about 6k over "legal")

My point is "Trailerable" has very different meanings for different people. I wouldn't want to try to trailer that boat anywhere on a regular basis but where theres a will theres a way
 

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Thank you all. I'd welcome any opinions on this subject, especially from Nor'sea owners. Having said that, the sheer weight and required launching depth of the Nor'sea has given me pause. I don't need a 'trailerable' boat that I can set up, sail, and take down in a day; our regional lake here has a marina where I can keep it moored (I live in the BC interior, quite far from the ocean). What I am interested in is a 'trailerable' boat that doesn't require a crane to get it into the water. I don't have that luxury here, and when I want to get my boat to the BC coast for a week or two of sailing, I don't want to have the expense of using a crane there either. So, that leaves me looking at the smaller boats, like the ComPac 23, Hunter 260 (25), Catalina 250 and others in that bracket.

I want the most seakindly design (motion comfort) I can find. It doesn't have to be a racer, but it should be fun to sail. Basic amenities are okay, because I think of it as a camper, not a house. Generous cockpit space is important to me (I own a Siren 17 right now, which has a surprisingly large cockpit), and I'm partial to good deck access for working the sails. Those are some of the features that led me to the Nor'sea; they're some of the features I've read about the ComPac 23. But I'm not stuck on any one design. I'm still looking, reading, and checking the market.

Towing is not an issue for me. I have a 2006 GMC 1-ton diesel, and I've pulled a 14,000 GVWR fifth wheel with it around North America, over a 9-month period. As for experience, I'm somewhat new to sailing, but I've taken several ocean courses so far, and spent a lot of time on the water this past summer. I'll be taking another two courses this winter and spring, to certify for bare-boat chartering.

Any recommendations and opinions are welcome.
 

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The Hake Seaward RK series of boats would also work for you, as would the trailerable sport trimarans, like the Telstar 28, Corsair 28/31/37, Farrier 9A, etc.
 

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Lowering the mast forward and using the boom as your gin-pole, although not as common as lowering the mast aft, is quite doable. Royce illustrates how his boat was set up in this manner, and (as I recall) mentions that for larger boats this is a more practical method. My boat (a Cal 2-27; a boat with a pretty beefy 34' mast) has a tabernacle and the necessary fittings to allow me to lower the mast forward, although I've never actually had to do so. Apparently, a PO had the boat docked in a part of Long Beach Harbor that is only accessible by going under a rather low fixed bridge, so the mast must have been raised and lowered on a fairly regular basis.

The main "trick" to this sort of thing is making sure that as the mast is lowered (forward or aft) there is as little lateral play in the system as possible. To accomplish this, you need to have pivot points near the base of the upper shrouds that are exactly in line with the pivoting axis of the tabernacle. (If the uppers attach to the deck aft of the mast, i.e., you have raked-back spreaders, you can't use this sort of method.) These points also have to be stabilized fore and aft by attaching short lines/wires to hard points on the deck. The gin-pole (boom) should also be stabilized with lines from its far end to those same pivot points on the upper shrouds. If you search around the Web long enough, I'm sure you can find a much better description of this method (I knew I should have bookmarked the pages I found....D'oh!).
 

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I agree with Sailingdog the Seaward 26RK or 32RK are great boats proven to sail well and give you the comfort for a longer sail (unlike a catamaran) If you go to their web-side they show pretty detailed videos of how to raise/lower their masts.
It isn't easy to find a used one but they are nice boats. I don't know where you hail from but check them out at Strictly Sail in Chicago next month.

Skipper E-J
S/V "Sailmates" 1973 IRWIN 32 Classic
 

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I've come across a few explanations for how to raise a mast, but it has always been for a mast that lies across the stern, never across the bow. And therein lies the problem I started with - because the mast step is forward of the boat's centre, the mast cantilevers so much more than an aft-lying mast. I just can't imagine how a guy manhandles a 35-foot stick that far out over the bow without losing it all on the ground (or on your truck).

Here's one link I found that offers some pretty good photos and explanations (http://www.tropicalboating.com/sailing/mastraising.html). Just thought I'd share that with you.

I have looked at the Hake 26RK, and yes, they are difficult to come by. In fact, no one in the Pacific Northwest deals in Hake, that I know of, and I've never seen a used one on the market out this way. I recently read a positive 'review' of the 32, in Sail magazine. She's pretty big. I'm not sure I'd go that large.

You guys are great! Thanks for your input. I'll check back to see if anyone else posts something, but I think I'm pretty well persuaded to look at anything but the Nor'sea for my purposes. I really like this forum. My sailing community here (northeastern British Columbia) is small, and this widens my horizons a great deal.
 
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