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Bombay Explorer 44
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I have a Force 10 cooker with oven mounted on gimbals in the usual 3 sided alcove. There is a locker directly underneath the stove but there is no opening from the alcove into the locker. There is a finger hole in the front of the locker and a hole at the back that communicates with the space behind the cooker and the lockers above the cooker.

The current sensor is fitted in the locker under the cooker. It has never worked since I have had the boat. Only just discovered that the sensor cable was cut. The test light and buzzer worked though.

I am fitting a new Xintex system but the instructions are pretty vague.

Where do people usually fit the sensor. Do you reckon it will work OK in the bottom locker.

Running the cables will be a major PITA of a job so I only want to do it once.
 

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I have two sensors. One sits directly under the stove. There is (will be, still under construction) a panel that is in front of the sensor. The panel creates a box that allows the propane to collect thereby setting off the sensor. The other sensor is in the bilge.
 

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Old as Dirt!
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Our gas sensors are situated: One in the propane locker itself; a second directly under the galley stove positioned where foreign matter cannot get to it very easily, if at all; and, the third, in the bilge in proximity to the galley. If any of these sensors does not work properly, or becomes disconnected/disabled, the control panel sounds an alarm and the particular senor's warning light illuminates to let you know which to look into. In the event of an alarm, our system also closes the solenoid value at the gas tank to avoid the danger of an explosive gas build-up.

FWIW...
 

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Imagine dumping a bucket of water on the cooktop. Where the water would go, or end up, is where the LP gas would go or accumulate. That is where the sensor should be. In a closed or even partially closed space would be a poor choice.

The LP gas flows downward much like water.
 

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My explosive gas alarm is an all in one unit without external sensors. It is situated directly below the stove in a compartment and the front panel, which is where the sensor is situated, is open to the main cabin. Just the tiniest bit of propane will set it off instantly. I struck a propane lighter to light the stove one afternoon and it failed to ignite. Two seconds later the alarm went off.

My alarm detects all explosive gasses, including gasoline vapor, battery acid vapor, you name it - if it can ignite, the sensor picks it up. I paid about $50 for it on Amazon and it has held up for the past three years without a hiccup. It was designed for marina and RV usage.

All the best,

Gary :cool:
 

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I put my one Xintex sensor in the bilge, in front of and below the stove. If the stove were to leak, the gas would flow into an open topped cabinet below the stove which has an opening to the bilge. The sensor is just below that opening. If I had a second sensor, I would put in the stern under where the propane tank is on the stern rail. The Xintex sensors will also alarm on other hydrocarbons. My went off once when a can of paint leaked.
 

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Can you guys tell us the name brand of the sensors you are using?

For an external rail mounted LPG tank fitted without out a remote solenoid, would you mount sensors in the same positions? Under the stove, bilge and maybe in a locker where the LPG hose passes through?
 

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I use the Fireboy from Xintex. And I wouldn't mount a tank without a sensor controlled solenoid.
 

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I use the Electro Systems lpg alarms, have for years. i have also installed many for others. GS7: Propane Detector with Propane Shut-off
The link above describes it as a new product as they recently changed the lcd display to Led's for lower power consumption.

The main sensor in a boat with the stove being the only propane appliance should be below the stove, but in a place where it cannot get kicked or wet. A good splash of water will destroy any propane sensor. The bilge works if it is large enough for a second sensor but it there is water present in a small bilge (as on a sailboat) not such a good idea. Powerboat have larger bilges and this location works for them.

The sensors these companies use are purchased and I believe the element is the same in every one - housings are different though.
 

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The propane supply line runs through the deck and then down below under the deck, through the lazerrete and then into the galley area..so wondering how many sensors I may need and of course placement.

I see the Xintrex is supplied with 1/4" NPT fittings. Is that a standard size on propane systems. Looks like the hose fittings are much bigger on this set up. I'll givei t a closer look to give some better info. Thanks
 

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I see the Xintrex is supplied with 1/4" NPT fittings. Is that a standard size on propane systems. Looks like the hose fittings are much bigger on this set up. I'll give it a closer look to give some better info. Thanks
1/4" NPT is standard on propane solenoids.

If you only have a stove that runs on propane it is the logical location for the sensor. A hose that is properly installed with good support and chafe protection through bulkheads etc would be very unlikely to have issues. Monthly checking for leaks is recommended for any system - that is what the gauge is for.
 

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Sensors are a great idea. True leaks will typically happen near hose connections. A runaway unlit burner should be shutdown by a thermocoupling. While the connection at the back of the stove is suspect, a properly place sensor should detect either the connection or burner. The propane locker is where the other connection lies, but that should be vented overboard and not be a cabin issue.

All that said, I've responded to several alarms. All false. Better than the other way around, but I suggest two preparations. First, be sure your heart is in good condition. That first alarm will get your attention. Second, be sure the override/mute is easily accessed. Of course, you'll assume it's real, shut down all electronics and ventilate the boat. Doing so with the alarm screeching is horrible.
 

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One of None
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the sensors are PITA! just like the smoke and or Co2 alarms. they just don't last I read the fine prin on co2 says "replace" if it keeps beeping. (thankfully is one in the house not the boat)
 
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