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SaltwaterSuzi/CapnLarry
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609 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I could have sworn I read something about this on SailNet before but can't find it anywhere.

Here's what I've got:

I have a Garmin GPS 76. It is attached to my computer via a Garmin USB to RS-232 Converter Cable. It worked with my previous computer which operated with Windows XP. My new computer, of course, came with Vista. There seems to be no driver specifically for Vista. I'm using the Captain Voyager software.

Here's the problem:

When I connect and turn on the GPS, the mouse goes "mad." Bouncing around, opening apps, closing, reducing, and generally making a nuisance of itself.

Somewhere (I thought here), I came across this advice awhile back which I copied:

Mad Mouse
If you have a GPS receiver which can power up or down (e.g. chart plotters or hand held GPS units):
1. Start with your computer off.
2. Connect the GPS to your computer.
3. Turn on the power for your GPS unit.
4. Start your computer.
5. Wait until the mouse starts jumping.
6. Turn off the power to the GPS (i.e. shut down your GPS) but leave the GPS connected to the computer.
a. OPTIONAL - If there is a serial-to-USB adapter cable between your GPS serial port and the computer, you may disconnect the GPS from the serial-to-USB adapter cable. In all cases, leave the USB connector plugged in to your computer.
7. For Windows XP or Windows 2000:
a. Click Start
b. Right-click on My Computer
8. For Windows Vista:
a. Click Start
b. Right-click on Computer
9. Click Properties, a new window will open called “System Properties”
10. Click on the Hardware tab
11. Click the button labeled Device Manager, this will open a new window
12. A list of devices will appear.
13. Click on the “+” symbol to the left of “Mice and other pointing devices”
14. You should see listed a “Microsoft Serial Ballpoint”
15. Right-click “Microsoft Serial Ballpoint”
16. Click Disable
17. This will mark that device with a red X, and it should not bother you again.
18. Now you can close the Device Manager window.
19. Shut down your computer.
20. Reconnect the GPS (if disconnected)
21. Turn the power on for the GPS.
22. Start your computer.
23. You should have a stable mouse now.
If you have a GPS receiver which can NOT power up or down (e.g. “hockey puck” type GPS receivers):
These are the keyboard equivalents to the above steps and can be performed while the mouse is randomly jumping around the screen.
1. Start with your computer off.
2. Connect the GPS to your computer.
3. Start your computer.
4. Wait until the mouse starts jumping.
5. Press and release the Windows key (it has the Windows logo on it, typically to the left of the spacebar on the bottom row between the “Ctrl” button and the “Alt” button.
6. Press the Down arrow key
7. For Windows XP or Windows 2000: a. Use down arrow and right arrow keys to navigate to highlight My Computer
8. For Windows Vista: a. Use down arrow and right arrow keys to navigate to highlight Computer
9. Press the Menu key (it is typically to the right of the spacebar on the bottom row between the “Ctrl” button and the “Alt” button)
10. Use the arrow keys to highlight Properties
11. Press the Enter key, a new window will open called “System Properties”
12. Use the arrow keys to highlight the Hardware tab
13. Press the Tab key to highlight the Device Manager button
14. Press the Enter key, this will open a new window
15. Press Tab, this will highlight the top item in the list (generally the name of your computer)
16. Use the down arrow to highlight “Mice and other pointing devices”
17. Press the right arrow key
18. You should see listed a “Microsoft Serial Ballpoint”
19. Use down arrow to select “Microsoft Serial Ballpoint”
20. Press the Menu key (right of spacebar)
21. Use down arrow to select Disable
22. Press Enter
23. Press the Windows key
24. Use the arrow keys to select Shut Down to restart your computer
25. Reconnect the GPS
26. Start your computer
27. You should have a stable mouse now.

Tried it and all variations and have had no luck. I've researched on the Garmin site, Windows Vista site, generic computer forums, etc. etc. I know I'm not alone in having this problem, I've talked to others as well as finding the above mentioned advice on a fix for the problem.

Does anyone else have the problem? And, more importantly, does anyone have a solution? :confused: Or somewhere I can go to look for a solution? I'm pulling out my hair! And I hadn't that much left to begin with.
 

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Tartan 37C
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501 Posts
Yes, I had the exact issues, and tried everything, finally resolved Vista and serial ports are not compliant.

Only resolution was to buy a new Garman with a direct USB output.
 

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SaltwaterSuzi/CapnLarry
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609 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Crapola! I was hoping not to hear that.:mad:
 

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Registered
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2,708 Posts
Reload the PeeCee with WinXP? Vista is crap. Seriously. I refuse to touch it. MS is already readying Win7, which is more-or-less a tacit admission on their part that Vista has been a dismal failure.

Jim
 

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Member
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2,448 Posts
At one time there was a Windows XP downgrade kit available for people whose software/hardware wouldn't run with Vista - I kid you not, only Microsoft could come up with a way to charge you extra to replace their buggy software with less buggy software.

Not sure if this is still available, but I think it was selling for around $60-$70 and they called it a downgrade or backgrade package.

Jim
 

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Telstar 28
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1,000 Posts
Vista is actually the problem... :) Which is one reason I use a Mac... No VISTA...
 

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Registered
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656 Posts
Vista is actually the problem... :) Which is one reason I use a Mac... No VISTA...
Yeah. I'm in the "anything but Windows" camp myself. Agree -- Windows Vista is bloated, clunky, and crap. Backwards compatibility is horrid.

Windows 7 may be your easiest answer. However, there are tarpits to fall into. Windows 7 features a different GUI than Vista's but has a very similar kernel and mostly the same libraries under the hood. MS squeezed out some of the bloat in Windows 7 and does feature great XP compatibility in the more expensive versions. I find the idea of charging extra for backwards compatibility (among other features) to be philosophically repugnant, but not everyone thinks that way. So if your GPS worked well with Windows XP, Windows 7 may work for you. Its advantage is that it is the path of least resistance.

Macs are a good choice. In fact, if you need your equipment to "just work" with minimal knowledge on your part and without fooling around with it much, Macs are your best choice. The price you pay for that convenience is the extra cost - Apple only does high-end machines, and you do pay more for the brand. Interestingly, the price penalty for Macs is much less than it used to be when compared to Windows computers with the same capabilities.

BSD is generally a non-starter with GPS. Few device drivers or applicable packages of interest. I expect Open Solaris is about the same, although that's only supposition on my part since I don't know it well.

Linux is the cheapest alternative and allows you to reuse your Windows hardware. The price you pay for very low cost is your time and blood pressure. It requires you be computer literate, willing to learn, and have the time to fool around with it. Setting up GPS with Linux can be anywhere from easy to impossible, depending on on the Linux compatibility of your equipment and the depth of your knowledge.

I like Linux, but it is not for everyone. If you are thinking of trying Linux, do your homework thoroughly before you wipe anything off the drive, and always do a complete backup first before you change anything. You may find TuxMobil: GPS Navigation Devices - Linux Compatibility Survey useful since is shows which GPS devices are compatible with Linux and the Linux distribution(s) that are known to handle those devices.
 

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Registered
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197 Posts
Or you can try something really basic

Start your computer up without the GPS turned on. Most serial interfaces see the GPS data as a serial mouse. Once the computer has booted then turn on the GPS and bouncing mouse should not be there.

I have the issue if I boot up my XP machine with GPS on no issue if boot with GPS off.
 

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SaltwaterSuzi/CapnLarry
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609 Posts
Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Or you can try something really basic

Start your computer up without the GPS turned on. Most serial interfaces see the GPS data as a serial mouse. Once the computer has booted then turn on the GPS and bouncing mouse should not be there.

I have the issue if I boot up my XP machine with GPS on no issue if boot with GPS off.
Nope - doesn't work - already tried it - more than once. Good idea though - just doesn't work.
 

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old guy :)
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1,061 Posts
You have probably tried this (is this what SVSIRIUS suggested?) - but this is what I got from my FUGAWI software people:

"This happens because you have your GPS turned on when you start Windows - Windows is reading your GPS and it thinks it is a mouse - you can avoid this by turning on your GPS after you boot Windows."

I hope you get a fix on this - it is a major pain when things don't inter connect.

Rik
 

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SaltwaterSuzi/CapnLarry
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609 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Okay - got it! SVSIRIUS - you were right after all - the key to it was I had to disconnect my WI-FI antenna before I turned the computer back on. Who knows why??? Anyway, then, I connect the GPS, turn the 'puter on, wait... wait... wait... then turn on the GPS, the Cap'n Voyager - and it finds the GPS right away. Then, I can plug my Wi-fi antenna back in and I'm good to go. I was looking for a high-tech solution - updated driver or something.

Thank you all for your responses.
 
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