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Land lubber
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Discussion Starter #1
First, be aware that I know little to nothing about sailing and rigging.

I have 4 lines running up and down the mast. I used one as the jib halyard. One is the halyard for the mainsail. What are the other 2 for?





Also, how do I hook up a/the Cunningham? Will it need to go to a winch, or should I be able to get the correct tension by hand?

 

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Broad Reachin'
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The other two halyards are essentially spares and nice to have as options. They can be used for a variety of things such as:

- an emergency replacement if one your other two primaries breaks
- topping lift for a whisker/spinnaker pole
- spinnaker halyard
- toppling lift for the boom (maybe)
 

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Your mast has a strange configuration at the masthead. Normally there would be sheaves built into the masthead with at least the main halyard coming out.

The forward one above the forestay is for a spinnaker.

The one along the side of the mast could be used as a topping lift, backup main halyard, or to climb the mast.
 

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I'm not sure that I'd go aloft hanging on the blocks attached to the side of the mast, could rip off. Are they riveted?

Those hooks on the gooseneck look upside down. I don't see how a reef tack would hook in.

A Cunningham attached to an eye in the luff about 1'-2' above the tack. The other end is usually attached to an eye near the base of the mast. The Cunningham itself is usually a 2:1 or 4:1 block and tackle depending on the boat size. We use 4:1 very effectively.
 

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Corsair 24
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well I was right about the kinked forestay for sure, there is one up top too

that is really a weird way of attaching the furler too...are you sure its strong and installed well

it really doesnt look well...to me at least

for your safety have it looked over by a rigger.

x2 on the blocks

the block to port is angled bad, you can see that if you pull on it it will come off the sheave...thats becaise its not raised far away enough from the mast extrusion...

you can use it for say a spinnaker and such going forward but definetly do not use it to go up the mast as is.
 

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The default no. of lines at the top of the mast is four.

Main halyard
Jib halyard
Spinnaker halyard
Topping lift

The nut on the bolt going through the gooseneck is about to fall off. It needs tightening up. There should also be a washer under it.
 

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Is it a secret, what kind of boat this is?

Also, is it possible that this is someone's attempt at a solent rig? Do you hoist a genoa on the forestay, and there's a smaller working jib on the furler? Not a bad idea, if it hadn't been done so badly.
 

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Corsair 24
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he has another thread its a small trailerable macgregor 26 I beleive...
 

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Land lubber
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Discussion Starter #9
I'm not sure that I'd go aloft hanging on the blocks attached to the side of the mast, could rip off. Are they riveted?

Those hooks on the gooseneck look upside down. I don't see how a reef tack would hook in.

A Cunningham attached to an eye in the luff about 1'-2' above the tack. The other end is usually attached to an eye near the base of the mast. The Cunningham itself is usually a 2:1 or 4:1 block and tackle depending on the boat size. We use 4:1 very effectively.
This is a Macgregor 25'. The mast goes up and down easily. I don't think I would climb it either, especially when I can lower it to do any work.
 

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Land lubber
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Discussion Starter #10
well I was right about the kinked forestay for sure, there is one up top too

that is really a weird way of attaching the furler too...are you sure its strong and installed well

it really doesnt look well...to me at least

for your safety have it looked over by a rigger.

x2 on the blocks

the block to port is angled bad, you can see that if you pull on it it will come off the sheave...thats becaise its not raised far away enough from the mast extrusion...

you can use it for say a spinnaker and such going forward but definetly do not use it to go up the mast as is.
The forestay isn't tight, thus the kink. The furling foresail cable is acting as the forestay. I do not know if it is attached right. This is all new to me and I have instruction manual outside of you nice folks :)
 

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I'd remove the line going to the side of the mast then, it is just extra dead weight aloft. You might as well remove the spinnaker halyard too if you don't plan to fly a spinnaker. You could leave that block just in case you do fly a spinnaker in the future.
 

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Land lubber
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Discussion Starter #12
The default no. of lines at the top of the mast is four.

Main halyard
Jib halyard
Spinnaker halyard
Topping lift

The nut on the bolt going through the gooseneck is about to fall off. It needs tightening up. There should also be a washer under it.
Thanks. Yes, I just fingered on the locknut for now.
 

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Land lubber
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Discussion Starter #13
Is it a secret, what kind of boat this is?

Also, is it possible that this is someone's attempt at a solent rig? Do you hoist a genoa on the forestay, and there's a smaller working jib on the furler? Not a bad idea, if it hadn't been done so badly.
I just looked up solent rig. I don't know if that is what someone tried or not...

I have not sailed this boat yet, but don't have a genoa, just a foresail.
 

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I doubt if increasing forestay tension will unkink the kink. And if that cranse iron or whatever holds the backstay out like that will cooperate.
 

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Land lubber
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Discussion Starter #15
I doubt if increasing forestay tension will unkink the kink. And if that cranse iron or whatever holds the backstay out like that will cooperate.
That forestay is superfluous. The forestay furler is acting as the forestay. Should I remove the unneeded forestay?
 

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If this is a trailerable, how do you go about hoisting the mast? What tensions the rig?

On my last trailerable, the forestay went to a highfield lever, and the furler was around the forestay, not separate like your's.

Maybe a dedicated McGregor forum could shed more light.
 

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Ian,
You have an interesting boat there. It appears to have a long and storied past. The rig has been modified pretty extensively by prior owners so let’s try and sort things out. The starboard aft line is the main’s halyard. The portside one is moved over to accommodate the antenna and should be only used as a topping lift for the boom. Your boat is originally designed as a masthead rig. The block and line under the forestay is for the original jib halyard. Somewhere along the line, a previous owner got a roller furler set up and could not mount it on the headstay (where it is designed to go). Instead, he mounted it below the original headstay using a strap to connect it to the mast. These furler extrusions rely on a stay running through them for support and to distribute the load to the mast. The previous owner relied on the aluminum extrusion itself to do that job. This isn’t very strong so be careful. The wire forestay cable is structural and is supporting the mast. The aluminum extrusion is not. As stated earlier, the forestay “kink” won’t pull straight and will be the source of an eventual failure (I know from personal experience.) Inspect it every time you step the past and replace the second you see a break or crack in one of the wire strands.

Now for the boom. The original gooseneck fitting had broken in the past and a previous owner salvaged what he could and fashioned a new one. The original castings were pot metal and were not long lasting. You need to remove all screws and bolts and coat everything with Lanocote or Tef-Gel to prevent further galvanic corrosion. Your Rams Head is installed upside down. If you cannot reverse it and make it work, you need to buy one of the “curly que” Rams Heads instead. Your Cunningham should go to a cleat towards the base of the mast, not on that already compromised goose neck.

As long as you are careful and inspect regularly, you should be O.K. This should serve you as a starter boat. Don’t push it in either wind or trim. Breaking the mast would be a big game changer and be more expensive than the boat is probably worth. Consider this boat as a stepping stone to your next one.
 

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Land lubber
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Discussion Starter #18
If this is a trailerable, how do you go about hoisting the mast? What tensions the rig?

On my last trailerable, the forestay went to a highfield lever, and the furler was around the forestay, not separate like your's.

Maybe a dedicated McGregor forum could shed more light.
There is a winch on a pole to assist in raising and lowering the mast. It isn't heavy though. I think I could do it by hand, alone, in a pinch.

I used the winch/pole setup to pull the mast a little forward. This created enough slack to hook up the forestay. All the other stays remain attached when the mast is lowered for trailering.
 

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Land lubber
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Discussion Starter #19
Ian,
You have an interesting boat there. It appears to have a long and storied past. The rig has been modified pretty extensively by prior owners so let’s try and sort things out. The starboard aft line is the main’s halyard. The portside one is moved over to accommodate the antenna and should be only used as a topping lift for the boom. Your boat is originally designed as a masthead rig. The block and line under the forestay is for the original jib halyard. Somewhere along the line, a previous owner got a roller furler set up and could not mount it on the headstay (where it is designed to go). Instead, he mounted it below the original headstay using a strap to connect it to the mast. These furler extrusions rely on a stay running through them for support and to distribute the load to the mast. The previous owner relied on the aluminum extrusion itself to do that job. This isn’t very strong so be careful. The wire forestay cable is structural and is supporting the mast. The aluminum extrusion is not. As stated earlier, the forestay “kink” won’t pull straight and will be the source of an eventual failure (I know from personal experience.) Inspect it every time you step the past and replace the second you see a break or crack in one of the wire strands.

Now for the boom. The original gooseneck fitting had broken in the past and a previous owner salvaged what he could and fashioned a new one. The original castings were pot metal and were not long lasting. You need to remove all screws and bolts and coat everything with Lanocote or Tef-Gel to prevent further galvanic corrosion. Your Rams Head is installed upside down. If you cannot reverse it and make it work, you need to buy one of the “curly que” Rams Heads instead. Your Cunningham should go to a cleat towards the base of the mast, not on that already compromised goose neck.

As long as you are careful and inspect regularly, you should be O.K. This should serve you as a starter boat. Don’t push it in either wind or trim. Breaking the mast would be a big game changer and be more expensive than the boat is probably worth. Consider this boat as a stepping stone to your next one.
Ok, should the wire forestay be tight then? It has slack right now because the furler is tensioning the mast.

What is the Rams head for?

This is a starter boat. My wife and I will learn to sail on it. We plan to move to a larger, bluewater capable boat in a few years.
 
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