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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Topic for opinion, The new (to me) boat I purchased in the fall has a 6:1 mainsheet system. It's end boom sheeted with 293 sqft of mainsail. The current blocks are wore out and I've already decided to replace them.
So the question, 8:1 vs 6:1?, does anybody use an 8:1 system for their main sheet? When I run the numbers at 20knot of breeze only a gorilla would be able to sheet the main at 6:1 but I suppose I should be reefed by then. 8:1 would easier to control and adjust under normal conditions but I end up with 100' of line in the cockpit.

Thoughts/opinions, please.

John

BTW, the boat is a Goman Express 35
 

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a comparison......

my 150 s/f something, 10+ ft boom uses a 4:1 and needs only 75' of line to reach (near) 90 degrees. You *gotta* need more at 8:1 and a bigger boat! ;)

6:1 is prolly fine; perhaps using well-bearing'd blocks to reduce friction as much as possible? Remember.... an end-boom fixture is at the end of a longish lever with most of the load in the center and fwd, :D
 

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Topic for opinion, The new (to me) boat I purchased in the fall has a 6:1 mainsheet system. It's end boom sheeted with 293 sqft of mainsail. The current blocks are wore out and I've already decided to replace them.
So the question, 8:1 vs 6:1?, does anybody use an 8:1 system for their main sheet? When I run the numbers at 20knot of breeze only a gorilla would be able to sheet the main at 6:1 but I suppose I should be reefed by then. 8:1 would easier to control and adjust under normal conditions but I end up with 100' of line in the cockpit.

Thoughts/opinions, please.

John

BTW, the boat is a Goman Express 35
A two speed system like this could be a solution
This is Garhaure but you can find this from other makes also

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
We have a Garhauer 6-1 on a 700 sq ft main and no winch. And I am 65 yrs old!
York, that's pretty amazing. Using the mainsail load calculator on the harken site a 600 sqft sail loads 2044 lbs in a 20 knot breeze. With a 6:1 your trimming 340 lbs?. Drop the wind to 12 knot and it's still 122 lbs.

I guess I need to grind the numbers myself.

John
 

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total sail load,s a ton, but one end...smaller at that , will carry (less than ) half. not an NA, nor an kinda injunear, but it sure would seem the load would be mostly on mast. then the rest is dealt with by the "lever"/boom
 

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You might want to talk to the tech guys at Harken. Over a decade ago they worked with a local yard to develop a gross/fine system for a friend of mine with an Ericson 33 (the Ron Holland design with the fractional rig and monster mainsail).
It's a 5 to 1 / 10 to 1, using stacked fiddle blocks, double-ended sheeting. Pull either one for the 10 to 1, or pull both together for the speedier 5 to 1.
Works wonderfully.

I have crewed on the boat off n on for 15 years.

My own boat has a smaller main and gets by fine with a 6 to 1 system.
As someone once observed-- it's all just Choices and Options. But, the more purchase you have, the easier it is to really enjoy sailing the boat when the pressure goes up.

Cheers,
Loren
 

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Anything more than 6:1 is really too much spaghetti in the cockpit. Try a Google search on something like 'mainsheet fine tune' and you might get some more ideas. I did it on my boat, a First 375 (and I needed it too)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You might want to talk to the tech guys at Harken. Over a decade ago they worked with a local yard to develop a gross/fine system for a friend of mine with an Ericson 33 (the Ron Holland design with the fractional rig and monster mainsail).
It's a 5 to 1 / 10 to 1, using stacked fiddle blocks, double-ended sheeting. Pull either one for the 10 to 1, or pull both together for the speedier 5 to 1.
Works wonderfully.

I have crewed on the boat off n on for 15 years.

My own boat has a smaller main and gets by fine with a 6 to 1 system.
As someone once observed-- it's all just Choices and Options. But, the more purchase you have, the easier it is to really enjoy sailing the boat when the pressure goes up.

Cheers,
Loren
Interesting system, 10:1 fine, 5;1 coarse but there was still line in the cockpit for the 10:1 purchase, yes?

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Anything more than 6:1 is really too much spaghetti in the cockpit. Try a Google search on something like 'mainsheet fine tune' and you might get some more ideas. I did it on my boat, a First 375 (and I needed it too)
Sandy, this is my point. I'd guess that 6:1 alone wasn't enough for your 37.5 so you had a fine leg on the end. 8:1 isn't difficult or that expensive to rig but I'm looking at about 120' of line. I could do a 6:1 with a 3:1 fine without too much trouble. The only wildcard there is teaching the crew when to use the fine and coarse adjustments.

John
 

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Here's the Harken Manual on "Cascading" and "Gross/Fine" mainsheet handling systems: Harken

IMO - For a mainsail of your size and with end-boom sheeting typically such large 'power ratio' systems are unneeded, even without using 'winch assist'. Your 'end boom' sheeting provides a LOT of mechanical advantage all by itself. I myself raced a P30 (200 sq. ft. main) with end boom sheeting with a 4:1 mechanical advantage for many years and seldom needed 'more power' when pulling this system entirely by hand even when apply gorilla strain to the mainsheet, of course all the mainsheet system blocks were all roller bearing blocks.
 

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I set up fine tunes on pretty much every boat I sail. I would run a 6:1 with a 12:1 fine tune on your boat, but with a very short throw on the fine tune. This gets the excess line out of the cockpit.

In order to do this instead of dead ending the line on the becket, add a simple block. On the other end attach a small block w/ becket and cam. I away from the boat right now so I can't get a picture, but it's pretty commonly done. It only gives you a few feet of fine tune, but that's all you generally need.
 

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Interesting system, 10:1 fine, 5;1 coarse but there was still line in the cockpit for the 10:1 purchase, yes?

John
Yup. The boat seems to have enough main sheet length that we've never run short. After a hard windy sail, when we come in to the dock, sometimes we run the tails back on one side until they are equal again.

Loren
 

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I have a 4-1 with another 4-1 on the back leg, giving me 16-1 for fine tune. I also have enough line on the micro 4-1 to douse the main when really windy, and pull it back in. Pretty nice when I only have a 195 sq ft. I would do the same with the OP's setup, but probably a 6-1 macro with a 6-1 micro, giving me 36-1 overall!
HEre is a picture.



Marty
 
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