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Commodore
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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Cheoy Lee 41 that had beautiful teak decks when she was new.


Now they're 30 years old and the caulk is all dried out and lots of the bungs are missing.


There are only two leaks that I know of coming through the deck. What I'm interested in isn't the process of replacing the teak decks, I've seen that elsewhere, but how to economically replace the deck with a nonskid surface and still maintain the character of the teak decks, because they really beautify the boat.

There's still a lot of teak wood trim around the windows/portlights, toe rail and hatches. I'm considering doing a khacki colored nonskid and adding a cosmetic teak trim at the deck level.

Have you seen any well done teak deck replacements that still retain the beauty of a teak decked boat? Pictures please!
 

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Have you seen the faux teak decking made by Plasteak? It looks like real teak, but has zero maintenance. I have to say, I'm debating changing the little teak I have on deck for the stuff. It looks that good.
 

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I Installed "PlasDeck" (Synthetic Boat Deck, Yacht Decking, Marine Teak Decking | PlasTEAK & PlasDECK) and really like it. It is a DIY product so you can save money on installation. On the negative side, it is not cheap, it is fairly heavy and it will get hot in the summer sun here on the US Gulf Coast. It has held up well for a little over a year. The manufacturer says it will not fade. I will let you know in a few years. See photos below....
 

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before replacing i would consider patching with misc tube caulking. then a light sanding, perhaps a wood stain, a sealing coat of solvent thinned epoxy (esp 155 ?). 2-3 coats of spar varnish with those fine grits that 'disappear' in clear coating. you could also consider a two part clear lpu finish over the varnish or instead of the varnish.
 

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██▓▓▒▒░&
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kraft, it is unclear if you are looking to REPLACE the decking, or COVER it with something.

It sounds like you just want to roll an antiskid coating over it. Which might work, if you could get the coating to bond well to the teak. But what are you looking to do, cover or replace?
 

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Commodore
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Discussion Starter #8
I intend to remove the old teak decking, fill the screw holes and fair smooth, then apply some new nonskid. I've only rolled nonskid on navy ships and don't think that deck gray will maintaing the same classic look as teak decks. Covering the teak decks sounds like a horirble idea to me because I've seen teak that's been varnished over and it's not an appealing look and seems slick. In fact, my teak cockpit grate was varnished over and I'm taking that back to bare wood.
 

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Ah, that makes sense. A lot of work to remove and then properly clean out and fill every hole but if they aren't cleaned well, the fill will pop and the new surface with it. I've heard of folks just filling (with thickened epoxy) and then applying a textured antiskid over it. The prep and masking for clean edges are the whole trick, rolling it on is probably exactly the same as what you did in the navy, but you'd use white instead of gray and a smaller roller. (G)

I haven't met the synthetic cork sheeting in person but that stuff looks damned attractive to me. Insulation, padding, extra leak-proofing over the filled holes...it might be worth seeing if any of those vendors are at upcoming boat shows, or asking for a sample. I know some have professional installers trained for their materials but obviously, a couple of heavy coats of white antiskid will be a lot cheaper and, after all, that's how a lot of decks always looked.

The gray "treadmaster" rubber type material is another option, that also looks pretty good and covers a wealth of sins. That stuff I know holds up very well, it just may not look as pretty.

You'll have plenty of time to check out options while "counting all the holes in Albert Hall" as the old Beatles song goes. (G)
 

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Sailin' home
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Have you considered buying DEK-KING from Teakforboats.com ? Their material costs approximately $52 for each roll which is 2 in. wide and 32 ft. long (5.3 square feet, 0.5 square meters), which is half the price of what other suppliers are asking. The material is top grade. It was reviewed in The Sail Magazine US Edition of January .. don't remember if it was 2012 or 2011.

I can post pictures of my boat if someone is interested.
 

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I intend to remove the old teak decking, fill the screw holes and fair smooth, then apply some new nonskid.......
I didn't see your OP two months back. I hope you didn't do this, unless the wood itself is beyond hope or you know the leaks are causing a real deck penetration problem. Even if they are penetrating, you may be as well served to just get it to stop as replacing the decking, unless you are going to repair the soft deck too.

Removing and fairing the entire deck would be an enormous job, let alone getting something new down that will look professional. Wow. Just thinking about it feels like an entire season of work.

I would sooner dig out all the caulking (they may a tool for it) and pull any exposed screws. Bed the grooves with tape and recaulk all the joints and screw holes. Glue in new bungs. I will bet this is less work than you are contemplating, but still a lot. This doesn't need to be done with perfection, as you would then power sand the entire deck, which both levels the caulking and cleans up the wood.

Let us know what you decide and how it goes.
 

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Commodore
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Discussion Starter #12
Well, the screw heads are all sticking out, the caulk is almost all gone and it's time for the decks to come off. I don't think there's a core penetration problem, but I've got a moisture meter and can sound the deck to see if it's wet.
 

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Commodore
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Discussion Starter #14
I've figured out how I'll maintain the character of the teak with nonskid. I'm going to use Sand Durabak. The color is really nice, and it's not so dark as natural teak, but not blindingly white. (or dingy white after being walked on and rained on and dirted on by my marina, downwind of the highway).

I chose Durabak because it got the #1 from Practical Sailor last year and it has more color choices with UV protection than Interlux Intedeck.


From top to bottom, Tan, Cream and Sand Durabak
 
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