SailNet Community banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
You mean North ISN'T up?
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,

I have started the renovation / upgrade process on our 1974 Grampian G26 and I wanted to get some other experienced Folks comments on my plan of action. I also want to get feedback on the best way to document this for others, either through this forum with pictures, or with a separate blog. This is a big project so I will try to keep the posts focused and as short as possible. OK, here are my plans for the S/V Elizabeth;

1. Cruise to Cancun from Galveston, Tx.
2. Cruise to Key west, then to the Bahamas from Galveston.

These will not be back to back cruises. Crew for the passage will consist of myself and 1 additional experienced crew. After arriving at the cruising grounds, the crew will depart and my wife and son will join me. She is new to cruising and I want to spare her the passages for now, until she gets bitten by the cruising bug..:)

OK, I am commencing on the Hull / Structural mods at this time, so I won't be talking much about rigging, electronics, and systems except for the extent that they interface with the current work. I have full funding for all work, and my technical experience / capabilities are as follows

  • Have or have access to CNC plasma cutter, 100W CNC laser cutter, 40W CNC engraver, Waterjet, Bridgeport CNC mill, South bend lathe, Mig welder, and pretty much any mechanical and woodworking tool you can think of.
  • I personally am very experienced with paint, composite work including mold making, welding, woodwork and furniture making, all types of metal fabrication, electronics and wiring, and have rebuilt several gas and diesel engines.
  • NOT so experienced with sailmaking and canvas, rigging, and outboard motor repair.

I say all of this so that you all can gauge my fitness for the planned tasks, or un-fitness as the case may be.

So here are the current refit tasks concerning hull and structure. I got a lot of ideas and info from the atomvoyages site (triton). This list is basically from the bottom up and bow to stern.

Hull;

  • Haul out and replace ALL through hulls
  • Complete bottom Job
  • Re-torque keel bolts and reglass keel joint
  • Replace rudder bearings / rebuild rudder if excessive shaft wear
  • Replace all zincs
  • Install required Garmin through-hull sensors

Starting at the bow;

  • Create watertight chain locker
  • Build integral water tank in second watertight zone
  • Rebuild bulkheads as mast location, going to a double bulkhead with integral torsion beam under mast attach point.
  • Remove existing head and holding tank and replace with fixed porta potty
  • Completely paint inner hull
  • Replace ALL windows. Fore windows will be replaced with opening, doggable ports, and aft saloon windows (Large) will be replaced with thicker material, but the design will remain the same as the original (non-opening). Prevision till be made for attachment of removable external storm panels over these windows.
  • Cockpit lockers modified to create watertight compartments
  • Cockpit volume reduced vis the construction of aft cockpit locker
  • Transom cutout sealed up to create a solid transom. I am concerned with shipping water in a following sea. Will use a outboard bracket for the motor, or perhaps a motor well like this;


So that's enough for now. Really interested in what you guys think about the transom / motor mount mod. I am just a little wary of a 1.5 sq. ft hole in the transom for water entry. You can see what I mean from this G26 stern pic;


But I may be a bit over cautious here. Also EVERY deck fitting and hinge will be replaced with new hardware in re-drilled and re-bedded mountings with custom fabricated 1/8" aluminum backing plates.
Thank everyone in advance for your comments.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
96 Posts
Hi Martian , please don't take this the wrong way... But the stuff you describe is to say the least a lot of work and $$$'s. And you still wind up with a big hole in the transom . How about this , you and yours sail local and have a blast . Do some sleep overs, anchor outs and all that fun stuff and basically cut your teeth . Save all that rebuild energy for your blue water boat . Just my thoughts good luck and keep us posted .
 

·
You mean North ISN'T up?
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Martian , please don't take this the wrong way... But the stuff you describe is to say the least a lot of work and $$$'s. And you still wind up with a big hole in the transom . How about this , you and yours sail local and have a blast . Do some sleep overs, anchor outs and all that fun stuff and basically cut your teeth . Save all that rebuild energy for your blue water boat . Just my thoughts good luck and keep us posted
Thanks for the comment. I honestly am somewhat on the fence on the whole transom issue. But the dollars on all of this are fairly minimal, and I have some free experienced help, so it's not real daunting in that regard. But I would rather be sailing sooner rather than later. But we have already done local, and are ready for the next step. Also, I will be giving this boat to my son when we are done, so the effort wont go to waste.

But having said that, I totally hear what you are saying......and you make a good point. Thank you.
 

·
You mean North ISN'T up?
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
According to a lot of articles I have read, a proper marine portapotty has as many (or more) flushes before cleanout than a holding tank, fewer hoses, less fumes and smell, and MUCH simpler maintenance. I wouldn't do this on a bigger boat that is actually worth something, but it seems to make sense for this situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,473 Posts
clmartin, you have one of the best sub 30' coastal crusiers ever built. Mcgruer designed a hell-for-stout boat , that was based on his experience growing up on the North Sea and his experience with sailors sailing on the Great Lakes. Some of your ideas are unnecessary, and there are some things you haven't thought about that are more important.

1. To correct some bad info- a 5 gallon porta potti will not last as long between pumpouts as a proper marine head with a 10 gallon holding tank. I have had both. i have now removed the porta potti on our S2 and am installing a holding tank and marine head. The almost new Dometic porta potti stank, was unbaffled, so if it was close to full it sloshed and leaked, it stank, and required a pumpout weekly.
2. Aluminum backing plates on stainless hardware is a bad idea. use fiberglass for backing, and stainless fender washers.
3. Don't worry about wasting time, effort and money mickey mousing the transom and creating an outboard well. the problem isn't water coming IN, but water not being able to drain OUT quickly. water in a cockpit is no big deal, you really have to work at it to poop a G 26, and you'd be better off building a bridge deck forward rather than closing off the transom, and install oversized ockpit drains if being pooped is a real concern.
4. the bulkheads are already plenty strong to take the compression load of the rig. tab the bulkheads into the hull and deck and it is more than good.
5. Take the money you would spend on thicker windows in the saloon and doubling up bulkheads and buy a bimini and a dodger. You're cruising to the Bahamas not to McMurdo Sound or the Northwest Passage. :)
6. If you want to ensure safety, install double lifelines and make sure your handrails are well fastened when you make your wateritght cockpit lockers, take the time to build a proper propane locker that is vented off the boat.
7. checking your rudder shaft packing and the bushings is a smart idea, and use your machining skills to make a new tiller. it's good to have a spare.


Have fun!
 

·
Senior Moment Member
Joined
·
13,306 Posts
BLJ has good advice. The first thing I'd do on a G26 would be to hit the C&C support site and order some of their lifeline stanchion bases that mount over the holey rail instead of on deck.

That will give you just enough extra side deck width to make them actually usable as side decks. Going forward over the cabin top in deep water is not my idea of fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
215 Posts
I agree with the previous mention stoutness of the G26. As far as the transom you should be more worried about water exiting the cockpit than entering it. If you were to fill in the transom and you get one of those ever so fun rising, breakers over the combings you are going to want the water exiting as fast as possible. Leaving it more open in my opinion lets the larger amounts out faster. Obviously making sure that the scuppers are clean and sufficient but you don't want the weight of the water in the cockpit long. Just my thought on that.

As far as the rest here is what you are going to find. Everyone will have opinions about it from "oh it's fine just sail it" to "your wasting your money if you don't have a Southern Cross or Pacific Seacraft". Thing is you have the boat you have and she is a seaworthy boat and plenty capable if they crew knows how to handle her and you outfit her properly. SO just start with the critical items. Here is my thought on those.

1. Make sure the chain plates for the shrouds are secure and really solid. Losing an engine 300 miles offshore is not as bad as loosing your mast. Make sure all the standing rigging and deck mountings are really solid including the mast step support in the cabin.

2. Make sure all the through hulls and stuffing box are in top condition and that your manual bilge pump is in good shape. That is one thing that I think is good to be way over planned capacity on as far as size and function. Being able to get more water out of the boat in less time is huge.

3. Ensure the engine and all related items are in full working order. Not a bad Idea to bring spare parts for the engine along with you.

Past that make the boat your own and have a blast with your refit. I am a guy who enjoys the boat work as much sometimes as the sailing so I understand the bug you have. Post pics and show us what you are doing along the way.

Those are my thoughts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Holland Marine has made stanchion attachments for the Toe rails of Grampians and they also have the special rubber needed for the port lights and a host of other hard to find/source items . Holland Marine Products

I just purchased a Grampian 7.9 Discovery so am also looking everywhere for tips and advice

From site:
Grampians had teak toe rails originally,,,in later years (about 1973) Grampians began to come off of the line with aluminum toerails. We at Holland Marine® have now come up with aluminum stanchion bases that fit the Grampian toerail. By removing the stantion bases from the deck and putting

This website has a lot of information on all models and projects completed to date by members
Grampian 26 Home Page
 

·
Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
Joined
·
4,525 Posts
Some thoughts

Starting at the bow;

  • Create watertight chain locker

    You need a way to get water out of this locker either water from the chain or from leakage at the deck where the chain enters.
  • Build integral water tank in second watertight zone

    You didn't say how far back this might be but you could easily end up with a lot more weight forward (ground tackle and water) than the boat wants. Might make sense to put additional water storage more in the middle and lower and use the space forward for lighter things.
  • Rebuild bulkheads as mast location, going to a double bulkhead with integral torsion beam under mast attach point.

    Will leave tho those who know more about Grampians.
  • Remove existing head and holding tank and replace with fixed porta potty

    This seems to be a terrible idea to me. How will you empty the PP? You will get tossed around at times and stuff from the small PP tank will get thrown around. I would go with a standard head setup.
  • Completely paint inner hull
  • Replace ALL windows. Fore windows will be replaced with opening, doggable ports, and aft saloon windows (Large) will be replaced with thicker material, but the design will remain the same as the original (non-opening). Prevision till be made for attachment of removable external storm panels over these windows.

    Seems to me that thicker material well-installed would eliminate the need for storm panels. We have four largish, fixed ports and never (for a second) thought we needed storm panels. The room for storing these (not to mention the cost) can be better used.
  • Cockpit lockers modified to create watertight compartments

    This is easier said than done in many cases since there are a variety of hoses, wires, etc that need to be accommodated. Also it is easier if lockers drain to the bilge. Otherwise you need a way to get water out of the lockers - water will get in even if it just splash when you are getting something out.
  • Cockpit volume reduced vis the construction of aft cockpit locker

    Is this were your fuel tank will go? Again problem making it watertight.
  • Transom cutout sealed up to create a solid transom. I am concerned with shipping water in a following sea. Will use a outboard bracket for the motor, or perhaps a motor well like this;

    I would go with the bracket rather than a well. You have the opportunity to add some serious cockpit drains or freeing port at this point. Either that or do some more research and see how often people have had problems with a following sea (water in) versus getting pooped (getting water out). There are G26s with a closed transom so a comparison should be possible.


So that's enough for now. Really interested in what you guys think about the transom / motor mount mod. I am just a little wary of a 1.5 sq. ft hole in the transom for water entry. You can see what I mean from this G26 stern pic;


But I may be a bit over cautious here. Also EVERY deck fitting and hinge will be replaced with new hardware in re-drilled and re-bedded mountings with custom fabricated 1/8" aluminum backing plates.
Thank everyone in advance for your comments.
Can't see the advantage of replacing an old, but perfectly serviceable cleat or whatever just because it is old. Some of the hardware from 30 years ago is much stronger than current stuff. Many backing plates are aluminum but there are other choices available like stainless, Starboard, or fibreglass.

You did not mention chain plates. I would replace these or at least give them a thorough inspection. When you are doing the interior consider what hardware you might need for lee cloths and a fanny strap for the cook. Also consider how storage efficiency could be improved.
 

·
Old enough to know better
Joined
·
4,354 Posts
Seems to me you are trying to make the boat something it is not. I understand you have the boat, but I would concentrate on the rigging, chain plates and sails, then do some other upgrades like lifelines. The boat is stout, and you are talking about some short passages that weather routing should be able to avoid the worst stuff. You sound like you are trying to make a circumnavigator for coastal/light offshore duty. water tight chain locker, not necessary(how will you deal with a tangled mess of rode?), water tight cockpit lockers not necessary. But I bet after the first time cruising the wife will either say NEVER AGAIN or lets get a bigger boat. If you go for a bigger boat, you would have a modified boat you spent a lot of money on, and will be able to sell it for no more than you paid.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top