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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, this wanna be my new project for the next 3-4 years!. This is a Cheoy Lee Luders 36, and has a major damage on the hull. I am wondering if it's possible to bring such a hull back at its original condition and make her again a seaworthy offshore cruiser.





 

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It is only time and money...and it can be fixed, but as rugosa says, it may not be "worth" it, down the road.

ie You may never break even or not lose big time on your time and money. As slowly as this appears to have happened, I would surely have a surveyor render an opinion, if not a full survey.

best of luck on your new project
 

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That hull damage under the 'jackstand' can be repaired - probably also has gross delamination in the adjacent area and you'll not know how extensive until you 'open' it.

Id be far more keenly concerned with that crack at the top of the encapsulated keel ballast, as this is a MAJOR MAJOR issue and in an extremely stress sensitive / stress critical area. Further and especially if water has penetrated into the ballast 'cavity', and if the ballast is iron and is now 'rusting' such an extensive repair can possibly only result in a 'heartache' when the rust continues to 'push' that encapsulation apart and 'down deeper' than that crack.

That keel crack is along the upper top margin of the ballast -- such a repair there is going to have to be critically 'awesome'. IMO - this keel crack is suggestive of a complete structural failure, not fixable via a simple cosmetic repair.
see the line drawing: LUDERS 36 (CHEOY LEE) sailboat specifications and details on sailboatdata.com
If the ballast is LEAD, then you have a minor chance at restoration; but, this is going to involve some pretty 'severe' repair and unless you are 'very good' with tapering and precise epoxy fiberglass repair work and are very precise at restoring back to the OEM structural geometry and surface curves at the turn of the bilge and deeply into the hull ... Id make the suggestion to look for a hull that isnt 'totaled'.
Sorry.
 

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In addition to Rich's comments, these boats are known to have deck/house issues with plenty of plywood used. Before you even start thinking about hull repairs have the entire deck and house inspected.. After such obvious neglect this is probably not a good candidate for restoration.
 

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Looks like no chain on the stands and no pads...anyone who'd block a boat like that has probably abused her in numerous other ways. First thing any dreamer who takes on this boat (hopefully getting a few thousand dollars for taking it of the owner (or yard's) plate, is spend that few thousand to properly block the boat on new stands.

I suspect a few pictures of the deck would be an eyeful.
 

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islander bahama 24
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The hull damage is repairable and the keel joint issue is real easy the keel is lead and bolted on so drop and rebed solves that issue I would be most concerned with what may have been damaged inside and in the hull layup in the area where the stand penetrated the hull get a good survey or at least a shipwright to take a serious look with and for you before investing any money in this project
 

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Check out the free PDF archives or call the free tech support at West Systems to get some idea of what fiberglass structural repairs involve for a job like this. Professional repairs will cost money, DIY is feasible if you've got the skills. But as others have said, get some professional advice on whether there is other damage to the boat and whether it will be worth repairing overall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank all of you for your responses.
As stated hull damage under the 'jackstand' is not a big issue and can be repaired even some delamination involved. I am worried about the structural damage that (probably) exists at that area, and if it would be repairable. That keel crack along the upper top margin of the ballast (as RichH mentioned) is the critical issue for me. What are your opinions regarding structural repairs?

I leave in small city where there are not many sailboats so I don’t have the ability to choose another hull for restoration. The good news are that I can purchase this boat for free, and that labor time is not a deal for me, since some of my employers at low season period (2-3 months every year, maybe more) are paid to drink beers.

The boat is abandoned the last years. I was not able to examine the deck, but I am psychologically ready for a full restoration. This project would be like building a boat almost from nothing.
 

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One of None
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DON'T take on the project. There are thousands of boats out there for free or very little that ARE much better choices!

To get more information and help you will need allot more photos!

Sitting in a field for years means; Rats and mice, bugs, mold and mildew. rotten wood and Choys have lots of wood in and out.

Check out owners site http://www.cheoyleeassociation.com/Owners/ludersowners.htm

line drawings from sailboat data.

 

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Barquito
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Some people like sailing, some like working on boats. If you like working on boats, and are OK with spending a lot of money doing it, then this could be the right project. If you want to be able to sail it someday without spending a ton of money, this may not be the project you want.

Oh, and welcome to Sailnet. If you decide to take this on, keep in touch. There is a ton of help to be had here.
 

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YES It is repairable ! It will take time and a fair amount of skill. You should definitely contact a surveyor. Not so much to tell you there is a problem with the hull, but how to accomplish a proper repair. The ballast can be dropped, and then you have to get the sole out of the way to get at the affected area/s. The reason that happened is that the hull blocking settled and the stands did not. Also the use of incorrect padding on the stands did not help. The smile at the keel hull joint is probably from the pressure and inward pushing of the stands. I would also bet that the floors in that area have broken, and or the keel bolts pulled through the floors. If the rest of the boat is in decent condition, and only a survey and your ability will decide that, then it may be a worth while project. Just understand that if you have a time frame of getting it done, double it. Expense projection , again double it. Good luck !
 

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Zoom in on the bottom of the keel in the 3rd pic and you see why this happened. Looks like there was a piece of plywood that buckled or rotted, causing the keel to pull the full weight of the boat down onto the jackstands:
I've seen free boats in far better shape than this, and the dreamy-eyed owners still gave up on them after squandering a bunch of money and time. You had better know what you are getting into. Most free boats are worth less than zero.
 

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Make a list of all the equipment and material you will need to get this boat to sail again. Spend some time putting prices to the list. Now double the total. Make an estimate of the time required to fix the boat so it will sail. Double that. Are they going to let you keep the boat in the yard for free? If not factor that cost into the equation. My suggestion, use the time to earn money at a part time job then go buy a boat ready or almost ready to go sailing.
 

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islander bahama 24
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What's with all the negativity he already said he's OK with the time and money to fix her just asked if it could be done and would she be a safe vessel after done and the answer is yes you can restore her and yes she will be safe after proper repairs
 

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What's with all the negativity he already said he's OK with the time and money to fix her just asked if it could be done and would she be a safe vessel after done and the answer is yes you can restore her and yes she will be safe after proper repairs
The more relevant question is will OP run out of money before the vessel is rendered safe? And will the ultimate cost of the project be so high that the money would be better spent on one of hundreds of other vessels?

Anything can be done, given infinite funds. Many people run out of money before that happens.
 
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