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Super Fuzzy Moderator
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Sufferers, how do you cope ?

In both power and sailingboats I've spent an awful lot of time on the water through my whole life and in all that time I've been seasick four times.

Not bad you might say but I was a child the first time and had pigged out on confectionary and flavoured milk so no surprise there.

Unfortunately the last three times have been on the last three coastal passages I've been on. The first time was an early morning start after a particularly boozey dinner the night before so I put it down to the hangover but the second and third I had been quite careful the night before so there is no obvious reason for the illness. All three passages were in somewhat willing conditions but not excessively so. Sub 25knots wind, swell maybe a couple of meters, no white caps, broad reaching most of the time.

Yesterday, three of us delivered a mate's boat up the coast from Sydney for a race she's entered in next week. The boat is no stripped out lightweight racer, she's a cruising boat of moderate design, a Van de Stadt 34. Well known, well regarded, I've owned one myself and they are very well mannered at sea.

So now, I am getting worried. Seemingly something has changed in me that is causing a propensity towards seasickness that wasn't previously there. Coastal and offshore have always given me the greatest of pleasure in the past but now blech. Freaky for me but fellow sufferers, what do you do to keep functioning when all you want to do is stick your head through the lifelines and cast your bread upon the water ?
 

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Super Fuzzy Moderator
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Discussion Starter #2

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Andrew:

I haven't been seasick much.. I'm fortunate to be pretty immune to it, but I do recall when I have been seasick, and I do recall the abject misery of it..

A couple of ideas..

Have you tried vomiting? My daughter gets seasick, and once she barfs, she's fine. Maybe you are holding back, and should just forget the embarassment, and get it over with..

Also, we have had real good luck with ginger pills, and ginger gum. Seems to work pretty well.

P.S.

Please provide various Australian slang terms for vomiting.

Thank you
 

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If this is a new but recurring phenomena look for what may have changed with you. You didn't state your age. Do you wear vision correction? Has your vision changed? New sunglasses causing distortion?Seasickness is primarily your inner ear / balance queued not jibing with visual input causing your brain to think that you've been poisoned.
 

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Fortunately for me I have never had the experience. I have heard that putting in one ear plug helps some people but it doesn't help my daughter. She suffers greatly and it ruins her experience. Would love to find a remedy that does not involve medication.
 

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Go the spew!

If you saw the video of our last 150-mile offshore, you'll know that I tossed chum for the first time (along with the boys). I hurled twice over the span of a couple of hours - then was fine. I didn't have much of an appetite for several hours thereafter, but was able to start eating again at dinner.

We had taken Bonine prior to heading out - but the seas were big and stinky.

All to say, I'm with Djod - chunk your frijoles and get on with it. I think that's the only real cure.
 

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So now, I am getting worried. Seemingly something has changed in me that is causing a propensity towards seasickness that wasn't previously there. Coastal and offshore have always given me the greatest of pleasure in the past but now blech. Freaky for me but fellow sufferers, what do you do to keep functioning when all you want to do is stick your head through the lifelines and cast your bread upon the water ?
A, it's probably just nerves... but right now I can think of nothing that would look more miserable than a sea-sick Wombat! :eek: :eek:

I don't normally get sea-sick either, but not wanting to miss a moment of my Tall Ship adventure, I dosed up on ginger tablets (Blackmore's travacalm version is cheaper than the other one) and that seemed to work for me. Just took the edge off. Certainly had none of the usual side effects (drowsiness) that you get with the usual stuff and is the last thing you want on a smallish yacht.

Maybe buy a packet or two and give that a try for next time you sail outside the heads. ;)
 

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Lat year we did a 3 day trip to the French island of St. Pierre off the south coast of Newfoundland. We had several crew members that were prone to seasickness. One of the crew brought Stugeron from Europe which really seemed to help. Prefer to avoid the meds if possible but it saved these giys on a long trip.
 

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In my time at sea I have only had two people who didn't get over being seasick on passages.
One was a very close friend who always got seasick, no matter what the conditions, but refused to let it interfere with his love of sailing. "Hold the wheel for a second," he'd say, go to the rail and return as if it was the most normal thing.
The second was a young lady, on a sail from NZ to Fiji. I always put seasick crew on the wheel after a few hours and once they understand that the ocean is NOT in control (or maybe it's just the concentration steering takes?) every single one has gotten better. But with this young woman, the other crew felt making her steer would be cruel, so I relented and the poor girl spent 6 days and nights in bed, very, very seasick and dangerously dehydrated toward the end.
Perhaps for those of you who do not sail for 24+ hours straight, you just never have the time to get over it. I would suggest a really simple breakfast; no oil, grease, butter or sugar. Hard boiled eggs, plain toast or cereal, light on the milk and no sugar. Donuts, bear claws and the like won't do. I'd even avoid coffee until I was sure it wasn't a contributing factor.
Saltines seem to be the snack of choice, though as they are pretty salty; water or a flat soda should go with them. Carbonated beverages and alcohol are definite no's, especially alcohol the night before.
One friend who I never sailed with, but met in the SoPac, got seasick all the time and his solution was to eat bananas; apparently they taste the same coming up as they did going down.
I hope this helps, as I've seen so many people, so unhappy, trying so hard to enjoy what I love to do so much.
 

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Super Fuzzy Moderator
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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Good people,

When I say sea sickness I am talking about hurling, chundering, spewing, projectile vomitting, not just feeling a wee bit queasy and I do assure you that when there is nothing left I am still retching. Mouthful of water, wait a couple of minutes and blurt again. Nothing stayed down.

I've ordered the pills as above and will take ginger with me as well. I wonder if Ginger Beer might be a good thing to drink on board ?

Yesterday, I had a light breakfast before we headed out pre dawn. Strangely enough I wasn't ill (vomitting ill) until quite some few hours into the trip and was still sick as a dog until some time after I was sitting under that proverbial tree.

I'm worried to some extent that I've developed an ear problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #12

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Stugeron 15 is on board a lot of ocean race boats. I have friends load up for me when in England, Bermuda or the Bahamas. Folks prone to sickness take one hours before getting on board or folks with good stomachs do so when big weather comes up. Then take as directed. No side effects. Boats I've both ocean raced or cruised on don't leave home without it.
 

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I still get sick on at the start of a trip. I put it down to anxiety and the more you think about getting sick the worse the effect. Studies show that the older you get the less the effects of sea sickness, something about the thickening of the inner ear. there has been some strange belly bugs hanging around of late.
 

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Addendum to my last post, drinking a little water will not help. You must when you hurl drink at least most of a liter, if you are between spits drink in between.
 

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Good people,

When I say sea sickness I am talking about hurling, chundering, spewing, projectile vomitting, not just feeling a wee bit queasy and I do assure you that when there is nothing left I am still retching. Mouthful of water, wait a couple of minutes and blurt again. Nothing stayed down.

I've ordered the pills as above and will take ginger with me as well. I wonder if Ginger Beer might be a good thing to drink on board ?

Yesterday, I had a light breakfast before we headed out pre dawn. Strangely enough I wasn't ill (vomitting ill) until quite some few hours into the trip and was still sick as a dog until some time after I was sitting under that proverbial tree.

I'm worried to some extent that I've developed an ear problem.
Andrew, I suspect the most worrisome part of your account above is that you were still not well even after coming ashore. In my experience most people recover very quickly once things calm down. I had a youngster sailing with me years ago that was already throwing up blood by the time we sailed into the harbor and within minutes of sailing into smooth conditions, he was asking for a beer.

Also in our experience is that the first 36 hours at sea are enough to acclimatise most folks and then seasickness goes away. We have friends who sailed around the world for years and every time they set off on a voyage the lady was sick for a day or two and then nothing.

All the accounts of ginger are true - even down to ordinary ginger ale (as opposed to ginger beer which is a bit harsh for me) and ginger snaps (biscuits)- they all seem to work well with my wife who has that little white rim around her mouth all the time we're at sea.

I am one of the fortunate ones - I am bullet-proof when it comes to seasickness - never ever had it but I've seen some real beauties - I hope this is fixable for you without long-term medication - that sucks.
 

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Stugeron 15 is on board a lot of ocean race boats. I have friends load up for me when in England, Bermuda or the Bahamas. Folks prone to sickness take one hours before getting on board or folks with good stomachs do so when big weather comes up. Then take as directed. No side effects. Boats I've both ocean raced or cruised on don't leave home without it.
My wife has used Stugeron and found it makes her quite sleepy - then again maybe it's just the seasickness that does that. Everyone is different.
 

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Sufferers, how do you cope ?
Have your eye glass prescription checked.
Same thing happened to my wife. She got a new prescription and was fine.

Pregnancy can cause it too but that would be a little unusual in your case.
 

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It could also be an ear infection. Have you noticed any changes in your hearing?

If you're afraid of doctors, something to try is putting a few drops of a 50/50 mix of alcohol and white vinegar into your ear. I usually make up a 4-8 oz bottle of it at one sitting, and add some tea tree oil to it, too. The vinegar changes the pH in your ear so the nasty stuff that might be living there won't like it and will leave. The alcohol dries out the stuff, too. And, if you use it, the tea tree's natural antibiotics can help drive off any infections.

If you decide to try this, a few notes:

1) it may burn - be prepared. Your ears are a lot more sensitive than you think, and even 2-3 drops will burn if there is any infection.
2) Sit down the first few times you put the drops in, and try to keep it at room temperature or warmer. Cold liquids dripped into your ear can knock you off balance.
3) It will take a few days of use, and I'd use it 2-3 times a day, before you see any results.
 
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