SailNet Community banner
21 - 24 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,551 Posts
If the motor is raw water cooled, a single night of freezing temperatures can split the engine barrels. (In my case split one of the barrels on a Volvo MD17c). A single night was enough.
Thereafter, when leaving the boat in Autumn and Winter, we always drain the barrels and exhaust mainfold. Also, attach a spare hose to the gearbox coolant exit, open the through hull, and blow to create an air gap to allow some room for water to freeze if it wishes to.

When frozen, I recall that water seeks to expand by about 8%. Cast iron (typically) and aluminium are already in big trouble by then.

Your motor is probably fresh-water cooled, and allows the use of anti-freeze. Make sure you have the right mix in there, and again, be careful to allow enough airspace on the (non-anti-freeze) external side of the heat exchanger.

To each their own, but I am not a devotee of leaving slow heaters on the boat. If the heater fails then you are into freezing fairly quickly. Also, there is a fire risk from them, I guess???

Rockter.
 

·
Registered
Contest 36s
Joined
·
7,289 Posts
If the motor is raw water cooled, a single night of freezing temperatures can split the engine barrels. (In my case split one of the barrels on a Volvo MD17c). A single night was enough.
Thereafter, when leaving the boat in Autumn and Winter, we always drain the barrels and exhaust mainfold. Also, attach a spare hose to the gearbox coolant exit, open the through hull, and blow to create an air gap to allow some room for water to freeze if it wishes to.

When frozen, I recall that water seeks to expand by about 8%. Cast iron (typically) and aluminium are already in big trouble by then.

Your motor is probably fresh-water cooled, and allows the use of anti-freeze. Make sure you have the right mix in there, and again, be careful to allow enough airspace on the (non-anti-freeze) external side of the heat exchanger.

To each their own, but I am not a devotee of leaving slow heaters on the boat. If the heater fails then you are into freezing fairly quickly. Also, there is a fire risk from them, I guess???

Rockter.
My engine is MD17D but with an a factory add on coolant conversion. The only place the raw water goes is into a pump and to a heat exchanger. I replace all the raw water with pink anti freeze and so there is no water inside the engine or hoses after winterizing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
Mikes self questions in post #5 are valid to me. What is everyone else doing at your marina? Having boated in the South East (Georgia) since 1999, I have never, not once, even thought of any kind of winterizing. We rarely even haul out boats for any reason other than repairs, fresh bottom jobs. Most marinas in Georgia don’t even have any reasonable space for seasonal winter storage. Tennessee is borderline, while southern, parts do get really cold all winter. So I’d imagine it may be different. Regardless, if the boat is kept in the water, as long as the raw water portion of the engine cooling is dry, the fresh water system is dry and the bilge is dry, I wouldn’t worry much about it.
 
21 - 24 of 24 Posts
Top