SailNet Community banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Finally bought a Manson Supreme 25 and spent 5 days out on the hook over Labor Day.

Impressed at how quickly it sets. Immediately, everytime.

Sailed into one anchorage and anchored under sail. Normally I back down on the anchor at around 2400 RPM but decided to be salty and set the hook by back winding the main. There were three boats in a huge anchorage so plenty of room. Of course that night we saw a short storm or two blowing likely 30+ knots. Held great in the usual Chesapeake mud.

Getting the anchor up is harder and usually requires a forward burst of engine to break free even when right on top of it. Haven't tried sailing off the anchor yet with the new Manson.

I did experiment with "poor" anchoring technique when me moved to a new spot by just letting the chain roll out on top of it. Still set immediately once we were out of slack. Nearly ripped the rode out of my hands!

Very impressed. Always need use the right anchor(a) for the conditions with sufficient chain and proper scope but definitely an anchor one should have, if not the primary.

Josh




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
BJV
Joined
·
242 Posts
Exact same experience with our Rocna, having spent 240 days on anchor last winter/spring in tidal waters. These new design anchors definitely an improvement to the 1940s designs.
 

·
no longer reading SailNet
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
I really like my Manson Supreme too. However it does have it's achillies heel, and that is trying to set in weeds. If I'm anchoring in shallow waters where eelgrass is likely (in Puget Sound that means <10' at low tide, <20' at high tide) then I'll pay careful attention to the fish finder to make sure that I'm setting anchor in a bare patch of ground.

We've had the anchor drag twice (after having it appear to be properly set -- backing down hard with the engine) and in both times it was in areas with a lot of eel grass.

My wife laughed the last time we set in an area with a lot of growth because I went out with the dinghy, mask and snorkel to visually check that the anchor was digging in well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
547 Posts
Ditto with our Mantus 85 pounder. It's not nearly as pretty as the Rocna (I've yet to see a Manson Supreme in the flesh), but it's about 30% cheaper so I'm not complaining too much as long as the shank weld holds and the galvanizing stays intact.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,111 Posts
Ditto with our Mantus 85 pounder. It's not nearly as pretty as the Rocna (I've yet to see a Manson Supreme in the flesh), but it's about 30% cheaper so I'm not complaining too much as long as the shank weld holds and the galvanizing stays intact.
Rocnas definitely are the prettier of the bunch... That stoopid 'rock slot' in my Manson shank pisses me off every time I look at it... :)
 

·
first sailed january 2008
Joined
·
1,409 Posts
I like them both. I got the Rochna because they were out of stock on the Manson. I'll bet they both set evenly well. However, the 25 pound size is better to me than 22. So using English sizing is good. Sometimes I just feel I wish I had three extra pounds, seriously.

Did you dive in Alex or just stick your face in.
 

·
no longer reading SailNet
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
I just stuck my face in. I usually keep a wetsuit on board just in case I need to jump in, but didn't bring it along this year.
 

·
Chastened
Joined
·
4,861 Posts
Rocnas definitely are the prettier of the bunch... That stoopid 'rock slot' in my Manson shank pisses me off every time I look at it... :)
Jon,

Have you anchored with your Manson in rocks yet? Did you use the slot?
How did the anchor do?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
I liked my manson.
It held really well in high winds and changing tides.
I drag twice for me. Once near Jacksonville ICW. But it was a very challenging spot.
The second was just at Beaufort NC, when you come into the inlet and turn left (south) without going into the town.

it was only 10 ft deep. plenty of room for scope.
It was blowing in the morning with a little current.
Cant explain that one. sandy bottom.

I would definitely buy another.
 

·
Closet Powerboater
Joined
·
3,925 Posts
Jon,

Have you anchored with your Manson in rocks yet? Did you use the slot?
How did the anchor do?
I anchored in rocks with the Mantus last year. I had a heavier than expected current dragging me backwards as I lay out the anchor. She set like a train wreck and held in several knots of current.

MedSailor
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
623 Posts
Have 15 lb. Manson Supreme, used as my day anchor on my 8,000 lb.+ 30 fter.
I have spent a few afternoons playing with basicley no scope say 1.5-1?, on rising tide,
benign conditions under 10 knots wind...held no problem. Also have spent some nights
(protected/benign cond.) normal scope.
Equally happy with my Mantus 25 lb. as primary in some challenging overnights.
Have taken my 35 lb. Delta off boat.
Properly sized Manson Supreme, Mantus, Rocna new gens all
proforming heads and shoulders above our previous old faithfuls,
sad that some have not yet seen the light!
Do notice that Mantus comes up cleaner than Manson Supreme, have not yet
figured out why.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
I have a 25 pound supreme it really gets a good grip got it after dragging with an old CQR on a good bottom,Also have a 30 pound bruce and once that sets you are not going anywhere,I dive on my anchors quite often and the MS and bruce both hit the bottom and dig in with in a metre .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,111 Posts
I just stuck my face in. I usually keep a wetsuit on board just in case I need to jump in, but didn't bring it along this year.
Hmmm, sounds like you need a 'Look Bucket', something every boat should have, anyway... I most recently put mine to good use cutting free some seagrass I'd picked up on my prop off Halifax...

I think the best boat buckets are those fiber-reinforced rubberized ones that are often referred to as 'muck buckets'. Go into a West Marine, and look for one of these:

ENCORE PAINT 8-Quart Super Bucket | West Marine

Then go to a good hardware store, or poke around online, and find the same thing for $20 less...

Cut out the bottom, and replace it with plexi... Get rid of the galvanized handle, replace it with rope... You've now got a non-marking, non-sliding, virtually indestructible Ultimate Boat Bucket... :)





Oh, and painting the roll hoop of any roll bar anchor a high-visibility orange, yellow, or green really helps, as well... :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,111 Posts
Jon,

Have you anchored with your Manson in rocks yet? Did you use the slot?
How did the anchor do?
I never anchor in rocks... Well, not intentionally, at least... :)

I've yet to consider anchoring in a place that was nothing but rock... Even those where one might think there would be nothing but, you can almost always find a fairly broad area of mud or sand...





Whenever I drop the hook in a spot where I think there's a likelihood of hooking in rock or some other sort of snag or debris, I'll just use a trip line, instead... I'd never consider using that rock slot on the Manson, I think its sole purpose was never more than to make the anchor appear to be a less blatant copy of the Rocna, anyway...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
623 Posts
I never anchor in rocks... Well, not intentionally, at least... :)

Whenever I drop the hook in a spot where I think there's a likelihood of hooking in rock or some other sort of snag or debris, I'll just use a trip line, instead... I'd never consider using that rock slot on the Manson, I think its sole purpose was never more than to make the anchor appear to be a less blatant copy of the Rocna, anyway...
Being a sailor I am the black sheep of a fishing family(both commercial and sport).
As much as I would not use slot in my manson supreme, thinking
might be a pretty good tool for fisherman moving from spot to spot
often times over rock bottom.
However, agree slot does give marketers some separation.
 

·
Glad I found Sailnet
Joined
·
3,842 Posts
Our Manson Supreme holds really well. After installing it, I snapped our snubber line when setting the anchor. Granted it was an old line, but still.

Now I'm very careful when taking up the slack in the anchor chain before backing down on the anchor. The Manson Supreme really holds!

Only exception was this week in Port Washington. Not being used to muddy bottoms, I set the anchor in reverse at 1400 rpms like I usually do. (1400 rpms is maybe 40 hp on our 4 cylinder diesel.) Over the course of 20 minutes, she slipped backwards maybe 10 feet. Everything was good at 1200 rpm. The next morning I put the boat on a mooring.

Incidently, I use 1400 in sandy bottoms and I think I could go a lot higher but I worry about ripping the windlass off the bow. Seriously, the chain is really tight. In the same bottom conditions our CQR of the same weight (60 pounds) could never ever hold at 1400 rpm. The CQR would just plow along the bottom at anything over 1200.

So yes, the Manson Supreme is excellent.

Regards,
Brad
 
  • Like
Reactions: chef2sail

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,833 Posts
I love my Manson Supreme (45 lb model on a 42 foot boat, with 160 feet of 5/16s chain). It is without a doubt, the best holding anchor I have ever owned. It's the one anchor I've never had drag on me (including near hurricane force winds) when set out by itself. I boat from the northern Gulf of Mexico to the Bahamas and it works great in the bottom conditions you find there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
729 Posts
While I still think the CQR is a good anchor, I did switch out my 35 lb cqr for a 45 lb manson supreme some 5 years ago. I've never had problems with the manson draging while there is a spot on the chesapeake where that cqr would routinely drag. That being said there is another spot with good holding where that little 35 pounder held a 25000 lb boat during a cat 1 hurricane. The only problem recently with the manson is retreival. I back down pretty hard when I anchor with a max prop which has good thrust in reverse and this last time out that anchor was buried deeply in the mud requiring some forward thrust right over the anchor to get it to break free.
 

·
Mermaid Hunter
Joined
·
5,689 Posts
Only exception was this week in Port Washington. Not being used to muddy bottoms, I set the anchor in reverse at 1400 rpms like I usually do. (1400 rpms is maybe 40 hp on our 4 cylinder diesel.) Over the course of 20 minutes, she slipped backwards maybe 10 feet. Everything was good at 1200 rpm. The next morning I put the boat on a mooring.
I run up to full cruising rpm in reverse (about 2500 rpm on my 54 hp Yanmar 4JH4E) in Chesapeake mud and in fact everywhere. Technique is everything for anchoring in tricky bottoms (heavy grass and soupy mud come to mind). Lower the anchor to the bottom and ease out additional rode as the boat slips back (in completely zero wind you may have to put the boat in idle reverse) until the scope is at least 4:1 or 5:1 (remember to count from the height of the anchor roller, not the depth of water). Let everything settle a bit while you tidy up the boat. Only then gently increase engine speed in reverse to finish the set and test it. If the anchor doesn't hold after that exercise it won't hold in a blow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
547 Posts
I run up to full cruising rpm in reverse (about 2500 rpm on my 54 hp Yanmar 4JH4E) in Chesapeake mud and in fact everywhere. Technique is everything for anchoring in tricky bottoms (heavy grass and soupy mud come to mind). Lower the anchor to the bottom and ease out additional rode as the boat slips back (in completely zero wind you may have to put the boat in idle reverse) until the scope is at least 4:1 or 5:1 (remember to count from the height of the anchor roller, not the depth of water). Let everything settle a bit while you tidy up the boat. Only then gently increase engine speed in reverse to finish the set and test it. If the anchor doesn't hold after that exercise it won't hold in a blow.
I would only add a couple of things:

1. Be aware of the tide state at the time you drop the anchor and account for the highest tide you'll experience during your stay in your scope calcuation.

2. If the anchorage is tight and you need 3:1 final scope, set the anchor as above with 4-5:1 scope to get it buried well, then pull in your rode until you're at 3:1 and repeat the reverse test to make sure she's really set.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top