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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Help! I have a seacock handle in my hand !

Our 1984 Islander 28 has Marelon seacocks (i believe) that appear to be stuck. The original paperwork from her birth states that is what was standard and I could not find any receipts that prove otherwise. We had one y-valve handle break in our hand last weekend and it did not let any water in but is now in need of repair. The seacock handle is also stuck and will not move but before we break another handle (and this one to a valve accessing the ocean!) is there anything we can do to trouble shoot this?

Here are our seperate theories...

I think that the valve is in need of lubrication? Could that be the problem and if so then what would be an appropriate lubricant ? The owners manuel does not mention lubrication.

My hubby thinks that there could be some sealife stuck in the external side of the thru hull. We did have her bottom painted in about March of this year and her bottom cleaned about one week ago and they said they cleared any visable debris on around the thru hulls.

If anyone has had any experience with these type of ball valves and any advice they could offer please do . . . . .
 

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Nic-

Marelon ball valves and seacocks need to be exercised regularly, at least once a month, and lubed annually. If you don't do this, they will seize up and then when you try to turn the handle, the handle will break.
 

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In correspondence with Marelon (yes there were happy to talk with me) after breaking a handle off, they said to actually loosen the the seacock as if unscrewing it from its base. Took less than 1/8 of a turn and it moved quite freely. And, I think they even sent me a new complete seacock.

I agree that they like to be exercised, but they can certainly be too tight as well. I took the hose off and turned it just a bit and thing were fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thanks ! I will try to loosen it...if I were to lubricate the seacock does anyone have any suggestions of products to try?
 

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Lithium grease or LanoCote...
 

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When was the last time the boat was hauled?? If you need bottom paint, I would haul it first and take care if it on dry land.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
we just hauled her out a few months ago

got her blisters taken care of, bottom painted and top sides polished. We were hoping not to have to haul her out until next spring again!
 

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Gary- Forespar recommends winch grease, lanocote or water pump grease. I'd imagine the winch grease is a petroleum product, so I doubt lithium grease is going to damage the seacock, if winch grease doesn't. :)
 

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If the maufactuer recommends it, then I am okay with it. However I work in the waste water industry and we have ots of problems on seals of all kinds from the wrong lubes. In general the silicone is safe on damn near anything, except body parts. That's why I suggested it.
 

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Gary- Forespar recommends winch grease, lanocote or water pump grease. I'd imagine the winch grease is a petroleum product, so I doubt lithium grease is going to damage the seacock, if winch grease doesn't. :)
I wouldn't use lithium grease. Lithium is a metal and low on the chart of noble metals. That may lead to the beginning of corrosion problems. I know the corrosion is not a problem with the marelon, but the water from that seacock then may flow into the heat exchanger, for example. Marine grade axle grease (for trailers) is a good alternate. It's about $3 at Wallymart.
 

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Keith-

Lithium as a metal is very reactive, but the lithium that is found in lithium grease is in compounds that are not, and really do not pose a corrosion risk. Lithium-based grease is used very widely throughout the marine and automotive industries. If it posed any significant corrosion problems, I seriously doubt it would be.

Don't confuse lithium, the metal, with lithium based compounds... that'd be like confusing hydrogen with water... hydrogen by itself is very reactive, but once it has combined with oxygen to make water, is relatively stable and relatively inert.
 
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