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All right, Scott. Capta's point was not as you say, and the situation in the Trent River was not as you insist.

I was there. My boat is in the Grand. I have friends at Bridge Point. Theirs are gone. One of them is dead.

What happened, since you seem not to have bothered to read the previous posts, is that a 10-foot storm tide came up the Neuse, building as the estuary narrowed. New Bern has been there over 300 years, and the record flood before now was 7 feet. Bridge Point marina was well engineered, but the pilings were 10 feet tall. That wasn't enough for this unprecedented, unpredictable natural disaster. Almost all the docks there overtopped them, came free, and came apart. Every boat that was tied to one was swept away, most of them into an impassable railroad trestle just up the river, by the 6-knot inflow of water and the 75-100 mph wind. To say prepping a boat better would improve its chances of survival in that circumstance is ignorant and stupid.

I don't know if you're being willfully obtuse for reasons best known to yourself, or if you're having some problem comprehending the matter. Frankly, I no longer care. I'm going someplace else to blow off some steam and get rid of the foul odor the lunatics in this room are creating.
 

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One sunken sailboat has the shredded main flapping around. When a sail comes loose it can really rip the boat around and beat it on the docks and other boats.
 

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I don't know if you're being willfully obtuse for reasons best known to yourself, or if you're having some problem comprehending the matter. Frankly, I no longer care. I'm going someplace else to blow off some steam and get rid of the foul odor the lunatics in this room are creating.
Don't let the doorknob hit you on the butt.....:grin
 

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All right, Scott. Capta's point was not as you say, and the situation in the Trent River was not as you insist.

I was there. My boat is in the Grand. I have friends at Bridge Point. Theirs are gone. One of them is dead.

What happened, since you seem not to have bothered to read the previous posts, is that a 10-foot storm tide came up the Neuse, building as the estuary narrowed. New Bern has been there over 300 years, and the record flood before now was 7 feet. Bridge Point marina was well engineered, but the pilings were 10 feet tall. That wasn't enough for this unprecedented, unpredictable natural disaster. Almost all the docks there overtopped them, came free, and came apart. Every boat that was tied to one was swept away, most of them into an impassable railroad trestle just up the river, by the 6-knot inflow of water and the 75-100 mph wind. To say prepping a boat better would improve its chances of survival in that circumstance is ignorant and stupid.

I don't know if you're being willfully obtuse for reasons best known to yourself, or if you're having some problem comprehending the matter. Frankly, I no longer care. I'm going someplace else to blow off some steam and get rid of the foul odor the lunatics in this room are creating.
First, let me say I am truly sorry for the loss of life.

You have been attributing statements I have never wrote such as
"the situation in the Trent River was not as you insist" and other nonsense about a prepped boat saving a dock in your previous post. I challenge to find where that is in any of my posts. They are merely straw man positions so you can basically argue with yourself.

Though I have read all the posts I have confined my posts to the gist of what Capta wrote and your over the top reaction to it. He saw boats that were decimated and unprepared and I did too. Prepping is not just about lines and taking canvas down but also could include moving your boat to an area with better survival prospects. You said this was an "unprecedented" natural disaster and I concur but it was predicted. It has been in the news for days now in the UK with an emphasis on the strong surge (6-9ft).

Your accusation of being "willfully obtuse" and uncomprehending is just a projection of yourself.

It appears to me your reactions in this thread are due to what you have just experienced and I wish you well on working through it.
 

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Attikos,

You added some valuable information in that post. It’s a pity you spewed venom first and only later backed it up with some facts.

I feel sorry for your losses. Are you saying your friends tried to ride out the storm in that marina? On their boat?

However, another “fact” is that the NHC has been predicting over 10’ or surge in New Bern for some days before the storm. It may have been unprecedented but not unpredicted.

I fully understand the docks were not viable, docks frequently are not, as has been noted on this thread and elsewhere in the ramp up to a this storm.

Based on your location, and the predicted storm surge perhaps you should have either moved to boat to a different marina or decided to anchor out.

And I don’t believe 100 mph winds in New Bern. I would very much like to see a source substantiating that. I don’t think the shore front gusts were much above that level. I’ve been a bit out of touch a couple of days, but last I saw were around 105 gusts.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I spent a summer at the dock in New Boring as captain of a 65' steel yacht. I wasn't there more than a few weeks before I had found a dozen more sheltered places than anything New Boring offered, that I could move the boat to should a storm threaten.
For folks to say that the travel lifts were full and there were no places where the chances of their boats surviving would have been better, is in my mind just hogwash. Not being able to get off work or it's too long a drive, etc. are just excuses that show how little people in the boating community really care about their boats or the environmental damage the loss of these boats will do, no matter how much lip service they give to the contrary. Everywhere I've ever been that is subject to hurricanes has always had a bunch of boat savvy guys who make a pretty penny by moving boats from exposed places to more sheltered ones, laying anchors, tying to mangroves, taking down canvas and sails, putting out fenders or even tires, etc. for the owners, if they can't get there themselves. I can't imagine that that area doesn't.
One poster mentioned a storm surge in excess of the 10-foot pilings in the marina, but even here in Trinidad, we heard the storm surge was forecast to exceed that by almost 4 feet!
If I were an insurance adjuster, in this case, I would deny almost every claim, citing a lack of due diligence on the part of the boat owners. A couple of years of that will have the insurance rates dropping back to reasonable rates and putting the responsibility for what happens to their boats right where it belongs, on the actual owners for their careless irresponsibility, and not on the rest of us, who do at least make an effort, to ensure the best chances for our boats' survival.
 
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I spent a summer at the dock in New Boring as captain of a 65' steel yacht. I wasn't there more than a few weeks before I had found a dozen more sheltered places than anything New Boring offered, that I could move the boat to should a storm threaten.
For folks to say that the travel lifts were full and there were no places where the chances of their boats surviving would have been better, is in my mind just hogwash. Not being able to get off work or it's too long a drive, etc. are just excuses that show how little people in the boating community really care about their boats or the environmental damage the loss of these boats will do, no matter how much lip service they give to the contrary. Everywhere I've ever been that is subject to hurricanes has always had a bunch of boat savvy guys who make a pretty penny by moving boats from exposed places to more sheltered ones, laying anchors, tying to mangroves, taking down canvas and sails, putting out fenders or even tires, etc. for the owners, if they can't get there themselves. I can't imagine that that area doesn't.
One poster mentioned a storm surge in excess of the 10-foot pilings in the marina, but even here in Trinidad, we heard the storm surge was forecast to exceed that by almost 4 feet!
If I were an insurance adjuster, in this case, I would deny almost every claim, citing a lack of due diligence on the part of the boat owners. A couple of years of that will have the insurance rates dropping back to reasonable rates and putting the responsibility for what happens to their boats right where it belongs, on the actual owners for their careless irresponsibility, and not on the rest of us, who do at least make an effort, to ensure the best chances for our boats' survival.
If you denied those claims, the policy holders would sue your insurance company and win not only their claims, but their attorneys fees as well.
 

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I think OP is way too judgmental. Every boat that was destroyed has a story behind it, and many of those stories could involve significant threats to home, health, or other things higher priority than a boat. It’s too easy to armchair quarterback others’ apparent inaction without knowing their story.

Maybe OP knows a bunch of guys there who make big bucks moving boats, but not everyone is tied into those networks, and I bet those guys already had plenty of business, and inflated prices to match. In that situation the millionaires always get first dibs.
 

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Insurance is an industry built on denying claims - legitimate or otherwise.
What you describe is fraud. Why would you even buy insurance with that attitude?
 
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What you describe is fraud. Why would you even buy insurance with that attitude?
Because many don’t have that attitude, they trust the company. The few folks I talked to about the losses in the VI’s all expressed dismay at how claims were handled. Many were denied out of hand, others were written off as a total loss without any survey. All over the place. My personal experience with insurance underwriters has been less than promising, very, very little clue as to what they were about, understanding the risks.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
If you denied those claims, the policy holders would sue your insurance company and win not only their claims, but their attorneys fees as well.
rotflmao
 

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I am in a similar marina in Charleston. Anything cat 2 and above I would run at least two days before (probably south) or go way up river on multiple anchors. Those floating docks just cannot handle the wave action of a cat 3 or 4 regardless of storm surge.
 

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It is not an attitude. It is experience.
In the interest of keeping this fact based, tell us about your legitimate claim that was denied. Otherwise I would suspect you are just making stuff up.
 

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