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No, it's a good friend of Piotr's, Dave Estes. Piotr's boat is safe and sound at Perryville, directly across the fairway from my boat.

Gary
 

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Discussion Starter #82
Having just moved to a hurricane zone I have a question about anchoring for a storm. I would think that you should anchor from both ends of the boat up a river, but I don't know what I don't know.
I did do a search for storm anchoring, but couldn't find an answer. Any of you experienced people care to educate me on this? Or point me to another thread?
Thanks
For me, it's always different, depending on where I must anchor for a storm.
My number one preference is in a river, lagoon or creek with mangroves. Setting out as many anchors as I have and using all lines available to the mangroves, has always been sufficient to keep my boats safe.
If a mangrove area is not available, I will set a spread of anchors forward, never using a stern anchor unless I am 100% certain the wind will not clock around on me, leaving me sitting on a stern anchor with all my bow anchors hanging uselessly under the boat. Generally, I've found it better to be able to swing when the 90 plus mph gusts slam into the side of the boat at anchor than not.
However, all of this and any other preparations you may do are a moot point if there are other boats around that are not as well secured as yours. This is the major danger today. Those once tried and true hurricane holes of old are no longer safe these days because of all those who use them without securing their vessels correctly.
This means the caring boat owner or operator must look farther afield for a secure place for their boat, than the closest hurricane hole. This may include a small creek, barely navigatable for your boat, or some other place the crowd will pass by. Even a bit more exposed hurricane anchorage may be better than a congested 'safe' one if you can properly secure your vessel.
 
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I think this just speaks to the reality of the typical boat owner. Often they're far away, don't use their boats, don't know how to take care of their boats properly or don't care.


Separately I'm a little curious how so many sunk? Is it the rain and failing bilge pumps or is it docks bashing holes? Neither seems terribly likely to me for boats of this size.
 

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I think this just speaks to the reality of the typical boat owner. Often they're far away, don't use their boats, don't know how to take care of their boats properly or don't care...
I posted a couple times defending the do-nothing boat owners who may have had other life-threatening issues to tend to. Since then I’ve been able to view some drone footage and other videos in New Bern. The VAST MAJORITY (maybe 95%) of boats I saw had all canvas stripped and other signs of significant storm prep. So this supposition that people don’t know or care may be nothing more than overly judgmental ranting.
 

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deisher6
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I live in New Bern. We keep out PS 34 at Duck Creek Marina just on the other side of the Neuse River from the marina shown in the video. The Sunday before Florence I was visiting the harbormaster at Fairfield harbor as he was talking on the phone about places to haul boats. The gist of the conversation was that there was no space available from Jarrett Bay on the ICW to Oriental available. Duck creek began hauling boats that Sunday.

There is not enough local marina space to haul all the boats in the area.

We chose to keep our boat tied up at the dock. The marina is sheltered, with good pilings, and no trees nearby our slip. I stayed aboard Wednesday evening through Saturday noon tending lines tied to the pilings (not dock cleats). I never saw winds greater than 40 knots in gusts. There was plenty of 15-25 knots sustained wind. The storm surge was the problem. Our slip is normally 5-6 feet deep, at the maximum height of the surge it was 16 feet deep. The tallest pilings were a couple of feet below the surface.

Most of the boats hauled floated off their stands.

Driving back to our home Saturday noon my observations were:
The Grand Marina, located directly across the Trent River from the marina in the video, was half full and looked to be in pretty good shape. When we docked there included in the lease was a clause to move our boat during a hurricane. That may have changed with the sale of some of the slips.

There were a couple of boats on the Trent that had blown ashore and drug anchor into the bridges.

Around 14 boats were ashore on the west side of the Neuse between Queen Street and Jack's Creek. I later looked closely at the sailboats, they were all prepared for winds, sails, dodgers etc. all secure. None of them had any ground tackle showing... I suspect that they floated off their stands from a marina directly across the Neuse.

Our boat faired better than out home. It is the first time ever water reached out porch steps. Our home faired much better than most, no flood water entered the house. I had counted on power to keep the sump pump running in the small basement. A friend loaned us a generator and we pumped the ground water out the basement. (still pumping as I type this) We now have a generator for the next one.

I am good with a new water heater and a few rusty tools.

regards charlie
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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We just transited the ICW from VA to FL, all the way through GA as well (which I usually do offshore). It's obvious that there is a lot of damage to docks, marinas, houses, and boats from the last couple of storms.

As regards anchoring for a storm, being away from other boats, in the lee of high ground/trees is my first consideration. But, it is also necessary to have the ground tackle aboard that you need. Large (50#+ for a 35-40' boat) second and third anchors take up a lot of room and many boats often do not even have an adequate primary hook. I have been on the boat in two big blows of tropical storm strength, not hurricanes. Both times a lot of damage happened to boats that stayed in among the crowd. Most of the damage was the result of tidal surge and boats drifting around because entire dock systems slipped their pilings. In a blow I will estimate the direction I think the wind will come from and carefully set two anchors at a 30-45 degree angle to the wind. The largest strain on an anchor system happens when the boat swings at anchor. There is tremendous stress when the boat turns from port to starboard and vice versa. That's why two anchors at an angle seem to work so well. It stops the swinging almost completely. It also allows for adjustment as wind direction changes.

Just a note: A couple of years ago, I was in quite an unexpected blow while at a mooring. The wind reached 60 knots at a local airport. I noticed that some of the newer designs of (very expensive) sailboats swung uncontrollably. It was actually very scary to watch how violently they were yanking back and forth. The people inside must have had a wild ride. I'd say that using two anchors to secure a craft like that would be an absolute necessity as I don't see any way one anchor would hold that kind of action.
 
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old news, but the CG had/has "tagged" ~300+ boats in our New Bern area that were swamped, sunk, loose on the water, or ashore in someone's backyard or street....they worked the area diligently to identify the boats, notify owners, and remove environmental impact by pumping out fuel and removing batteries....still many out there some 2+ months after the event in need of attention.
 

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One boat which break free in an anchorage in a storm can damage multiple boats. And it's impossible to protect against this. You may get lucky and not get hit or have your anchor line ripped out and then blown to a lee shore or worse.
 

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HANUMAN
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What a ****storm this thread turned into.

Hope no one who left canvas on board was a first responder, Dr., nurse, lineman, red cross volunteer or even a cook in a hotel that had to get ready for feeding and housing hundreds or even thousands of folks who left for higher ground.

After all, that jib is more important than shuttering your house or helping out an elderly neighbor.

Everyone has a story.
 

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What a ****storm this thread turned into.

After all, that jib is more important than shuttering your house or helping out an elderly neighbor.

Everyone has a story.
Hardly, the boat is always our last concern and that of most, unless you're a liveaboard, and we assisted, and still continue to assist others...jib be damned.
 

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I attach the bottom of the swivel to at least 3 anchor points. This year I used a tree, on the far side of the creek, a piling from a neighbors dock (connecting to the bottom of the piling with chain) and a Danforth anchor with all chain rode (65') in our NC mud. The mooring ball and the boat are attached to the top of the swivel, so the boat is free to face into the wind. I use 2 pendents from the boat to the swivel.
For me, it's always different, depending on where I must anchor for a storm.
My number one preference is in a river, lagoon or creek with mangroves. Setting out as many anchors as I have and using all lines available to the mangroves, has always been sufficient to keep my boats safe.

Those of you who tie up to things on shore, how do you do so without creating a trip line for any other boat coming in to anchor? I'm imagining a line hanging a few feet below the surface snagging a passing boats keel or prop or getting tangled in the gear they are dropping. Do you only use chain and assume it sits on the bottom? That might not be true if the line is under tension I'd think. Do you assume approaching boats see the lines? That could certainly be hard in bad weather to notice a little length of line attached to that tree over there and then dipping into the water. Maybe you'd rig floats to mark it? Or do you just go all the way back into the creek or whatever and effectively claim that area so no one else can pass through?
 

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Discussion Starter #93 (Edited)
Those of you who tie up to things on shore, how do you do so without creating a trip line for any other boat coming in to anchor? I'm imagining a line hanging a few feet below the surface snagging a passing boats keel or prop or getting tangled in the gear they are dropping. Do you only use chain and assume it sits on the bottom? That might not be true if the line is under tension I'd think. Do you assume approaching boats see the lines? That could certainly be hard in bad weather to notice a little length of line attached to that tree over there and then dipping into the water. Maybe you'd rig floats to mark it? Or do you just go all the way back into the creek or whatever and effectively claim that area so no one else can pass through?
Generally, nobody is going between my boat and the mangroves I tie to; there isn't room. In a river, I've set whatever anchors I want and tie to one side with maybe one line from the other side to the boat until just before dark. I've already tied whatever lines are going to the other side and I'll fetch them and secure them to the boat at dusk. I've never had anybody try to come in after dark in hurricane weather. If it were to happen, then I guess they'd just have to secure their boat down-river of us. It's pretty much first come first serve in any anchorage for a hurricane.
 
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