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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My father just purchases a used 1980 CAL 25. Since he lives out of state, it's my job to commission, and deliver the new boat to a slip that we have in the San Juan Islands (about 50nm away). I've gone through the normal checklist, but one thing that stuck out in my mind was tools and spares.

What is an acceptable toolkit (not just for the delivery, but for everyday use) for a small(ish) sailboat?

Along the same line... what is an acceptable list of common spares and useful things to have on board?

I'd love to hear from the experienced SailNet'rs on what tools they consider a must and what tools they wish they had had when XXX broke on that trip to XXX

Thanks!
 

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Take a look around the boat. Is it an engine with metric sizes, or standard? You can get one of those convenient tools boxes from Home Depot, sears, etc, etc. Then there are the usual hammers, hacksaw, punches, chisel, screwdrivers, pliers, and vice grips. Most of everything needed comes in those little suitcase carrying tool boxes.

On Frolic I added as needed, and took away when I dound no real use for a tool. Everything was in a hand carrying plastic case.....i2f
 

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A fairly complete tool kit would include:

Mechanics tools like:

A Craftsman mechanics set,—this includes both metric and imperial, since I've found on my boat there is a mix... the outboards use metric, the rest of the boat is pretty much imperial
Several assorted visegrips
Several assorted screwdrivers, including torx, allen, flat and phillips blades
A large set of channel locks
A pipe wrench
A hacksaw
Some chisels—wood and metal,
A few drift punches
A small sledge,
A ball peen hammer,
A few assorted files and rasps
A set of calipers
A tape measure
A strap wrench
An oil filter wrench

Electrical kit that includes:

A multimeter,
An electrical terminal crimping tool,
A butane torch for heat shrink terminals
Assorted heat shrink terminals
Some assorted wire in red and yellow, 12 AWG is a very useful size.
Electrical tape, a good brand, like 3M
Spare fuses for any carried aboard

A rigging kit that contains:


Spare clevis pins, cotter rings and cotter pins
Some small line, say 1/8-1/4" for various repairs, lashings, messenger lines, etc.
A sailmaker's palm
Spare sailcloth
Sail repair tape
Sailmaker's needles
Sail repair thread
Some stainless steel rings
Whipping twine
Beeswax
A couple of spare blocks of the most common kind used on your boat
A bosun's chair
A good awl

A repair kit that contains:

3M 5200 Fast Cure
3M 4000 UV
Lanocote
Loctite (both red and blue)
Some epoxy putty that sets underwater. Progressive Epoxy Polymers has some really good stuff.
Boeshield T9
McLube SailKote
Some regular epoxy resin and hardener
PBlaster
Heavy waterproof bearing grease
Some fiberglass cloth
Some colloidial fumed silica (Cabo-sil) for thickening the epoxy
Some disposable gloves—nitrile preferably
Respirator mask
Some mixing supplies—cups, containers, sticks, etc.
Acetone
Denatured Alcohol
Teflon Tape
Plumber's Putty
A roll of butyl tape
Rescue tape or some other self-fusing silicone tape
A roll of duct tape

Spares

Spark plugs for your outboard motors
Fuel and oil filters
Impellers for the various pumps aboard
An assortment of stainless steel screws, nuts and washers
Shear pin for outboard motor
Props for outboard motors, or spare blades if using a modular composite prop like a Pirahna

Miscellaneous Tools I've found very useful:

A pocket multitool, like the Leatherman Core or Surge
A cordless toolset including a drill, a sawzall, a jigsaw and a circular saw is often very useful
Battery lug crimping tool
Several flashlights, including a headlamp
A dremel rotary tool is often useful
A set of taps and dies
A pop rivet tool with aluminum and stainless steel rivets up to 3/16" in diameter
 

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Since this has most likely an outboard on it, make sure you have a plug wrench that actually fits the plugs used. While a craftsman kit is fine, my Honda 7.5 OB uses an 18mm deep socket to reach the plugs and the 2 standard sizes don't/won't work in a pinch and there isn't enough room for a wrench.
I'd also throw in a Awl, or ice pick. They work wonderful for lining up parts and lots of other uses.

Kary
#49080
 

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A fairly complete tool kit would include:

Mechanics tools like:

A Craftsman mechanics set,—this includes both metric and imperial, since I've found on my boat there is a mix... the outboards use metric, the rest of the boat is pretty much imperial
Several assorted visegrips
Several assorted screwdrivers, including torx, allen, flat and phillips blades
A large set of channel locks
A pipe wrench
A hacksaw
Some chisels—wood and metal,
A few drift punches
A small sledge,
A ball peen hammer,
A few assorted files and rasps
A set of calipers
A tape measure
A strap wrench
An oil filter wrench

Electrical kit that includes:

A multimeter,
An electrical terminal crimping tool,
A butane torch for heat shrink terminals
Assorted heat shrink terminals
Some assorted wire in red and yellow, 12 AWG is a very useful size.
Electrical tape, a good brand, like 3M
Spare fuses for any carried aboard

A rigging kit that contains:


Spare clevis pins, cotter rings and cotter pins
Some small line, say 1/8-1/4" for various repairs, lashings, messenger lines, etc.
A sailmaker's palm
Spare sailcloth
Sail repair tape
Sailmaker's needles
Sail repair thread
Some stainless steel rings
Whipping twine
Beeswax
A couple of spare blocks of the most common kind used on your boat
A bosun's chair
A good awl

A repair kit that contains:

3M 5200 Fast Cure
3M 4000 UV
Lanocote
Loctite (both red and blue)
Some epoxy putty that sets underwater. Progressive Epoxy Polymers has some really good stuff.
Boeshield T9
McLube SailKote
Some regular epoxy resin and hardener
PBlaster
Heavy waterproof bearing grease
Some fiberglass cloth
Some colloidial fumed silica (Cabo-sil) for thickening the epoxy
Some disposable gloves—nitrile preferably
Respirator mask
Some mixing supplies—cups, containers, sticks, etc.
Acetone
Denatured Alcohol
Teflon Tape
Plumber's Putty
A roll of butyl tape
Rescue tape or some other self-fusing silicone tape
A roll of duct tape

Spares

Spark plugs for your outboard motors
Fuel and oil filters
Impellers for the various pumps aboard
An assortment of stainless steel screws, nuts and washers
Shear pin for outboard motor
Props for outboard motors, or spare blades if using a modular composite prop like a Pirahna

Miscellaneous Tools I've found very useful:

A pocket multitool, like the Leatherman Core or Surge
A cordless toolset including a drill, a sawzall, a jigsaw and a circular saw is often very useful
Battery lug crimping tool
Several flashlights, including a headlamp
A dremel rotary tool is often useful
A set of taps and dies
A pop rivet tool with aluminum and stainless steel rivets up to 3/16" in diameter


Dog you really got all that stuff on your boat all the time :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Wow nice list SailDog!!!

I also like the idea of "Add as you Go"... Thanks imagine2frolic!

And thanks for the heads up on having a specific wrench for the outboard. I dont have much expirience with outboards so that is very helpful!
 

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My boat's a lot bigger than a J24.... and yes... usually, most of that is aboard. I've fixed a lot of problems for people in various anchorages... and gotten some nice dinners out of it. :)

As you might have guessed, I was a boy scout a long time ago...and the be prepared part stuck with me...

Dog you really got all that stuff on your boat all the time :eek:
 

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This list thread made me laugh. ;) When I was a kid on my dad's 16' Thompson run-about, his toolkit consisted of:

large Crescent wrench
big ball pien hammer
channel locks
side cutters
both kinds of screw drivers (medium)
spark plug socket and ratchet
a couple shear pins, cotter pins and a castle nut
...and there was always a can of ether or carb cleaner wedged behind something.

You could just about wrap everything up in a regular shop towel.

I can remember him smacking that old Evinrude with the hammer a few times.
 

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Your dad's boat probably didn't have an electrical system with inverter, refrigerator, head with plumbing, galley with plumbing, or the electronics found on most of the sailboats today. To add to the complexity of a sailboat, my boat also has a fairly hefty ama folding system and mast-raising system that most boats don't have to deal with. :)


This list thread made me laugh. ;) When I was a kid on my dad's 16' Thompson run-about, his toolkit consisted of:

large Crescent wrench
big ball pien hammer
channel locks
side cutters
both kinds of screw drivers (medium)
spark plug socket and ratchet
a couple shear pins, cotter pins and a castle nut
...and there was always a can of ether or carb cleaner wedged behind something.

You could just about wrap everything up in a regular shop towel.

I can remember him smacking that old Evinrude with the hammer a few times.
 

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This list thread made me laugh.
I knew when I read the OP SD would come up with a list a mile long, it was while reading his list that I started laughing, not cause it was a mile long, it was because I'm only short a few ( handful at best ) items on that list and most of them is in the repair kit section

Amazing how this stuff just grows
 

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I just carry the tools to fix the things I can fix on the water.

I don't carry any allen wrenches--don't have any thing they fit.

I don't carry tools to tear into the outboard--I don't have parts.

Look around the boat and see what you can fix in the water and get the tools to do it with.

Before you get to the final list go through it for duplicates.

I prefer a screwdriver with different bits in the handle, six point sockets, and 3/8 drives with a piece of pipe for a cheater handle.
analog volt meter

Spairs include--
fuses
spark plugs
hose and bulb for motor
starter rope and handle
oil for mixing(2 stroke)premeasured for 3 gallons 4ea
kill switch lanyard and key
8 oz squeeze bottle of lamp oil
1' square of 3/8 plywood with holes drilled in the corners--good for sodering and beating on, holes for tieing to, on
Spare keel bolt and nut
spare tabernacle bolt and nut
spare ring dings (don't use cotter pins)
spare light bulbs--nav and int
12 ft of red and black #10 wire with alagator clips on the ends
asorted electrical fittings
old haylards and sheets

Not counting the rope, tools and spares weigh about 6 pounds.
 

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A Seatow Card:rolleyes:
Don't leave home without it.:eek: :eek: :eek:
 

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Don't forget the DW40, a few pieces of different hoses (water, diesel, sanitation ...), stainless steel hose clamps (all needed sizes), silicone sealant, and self adhesive sail patches
 

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I was carrying nearly all the hand tools, nearly all the sparesspares for the boat and the engine. I had a lot of problems while cruising. Neither the tools nor the spares were enough to solve the problem.

Now I have a minimum of tools on board: A wire cutter in case the mast fails, a good knife to cut the ropes. I keep all the tools on land and do not keep any spares. I buy them whwn necesssary. ( I normally do all the maintanence of the boat myself)
 

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I don't like WD40, preferring the better IMHO, Boeshield T9.

As for hose and such, yes, I do carry some spare hose of various sizes as well as hose clamps. I don't carry silicone sealant, as I don't believe in using the stuff.


Don't forget the DW40, a few pieces of different hoses (water, diesel, sanitation ...), stainless steel hose clamps (all needed sizes), silicone sealant, and self adhesive sail patches
 

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Too many tools

Way too many tools here... You only need two things - duct tape and a can of WD40. If something moves that shouldn't move use the duct tape. If something doesn't move that should move use the WD40. :) :) :D
 

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Pretty good overall list when you combined the add ins to what SD posted. My on board kit for cruising was put together after two years of refitting. Only way to know you have all the tools you need is to service every serviceable piece of equipment on the boat before you leave the dock. If you don't have the tool, go get it. I don't hire work out and have gotten creative on many projects, but haven't yet found myself lacking in tools. Despite the fact most things fit in a single, mostly well organized bag. The premade toolkits are not a bad start, but kind of a waste. I'd start by buying the basics you know you need then add as projects come up so your kit is tailor made to your boat.

And Imiloa - zip ties. WD40, duct tape, and zip ties. Sometimes duct tape won't stick to salty stuff.
 
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