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Okume Joe
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23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Happy New Year to all of you Spirit 23 aficionados.

I am pulling my 23K out of the water for a new bottom job. My question is does anyone have a good mast raising and lowering system that you use on your 23?

Previously with lots of help I have muscled it up and down, but need a better way. What is your method?

thanks,
Dthriftusa
 

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i had help the first time i lowered the mast on my spirit 23 after that i lowered it and raised it by myself every time . i have all the halyards tied on the cleats on the mast so they are the same lenth . i hook all the halyards togther using a mountain climbing d ring that d ring is tied to a lenth of mountain climbing rope .

i have a long flat nylon strap i tie to the boat trailer in front of the winch post on the trailer so it cant slide backward . the strap comes up between the bow pulpuit and has a d ring attached to it and a rescue 8 with ears is attached to that . properly run the line from the mast through the rescue 8 . pull everything tight and tie the line off to the mast .

i have a tall mast support secured to the stern pulpuit it is shaped like a Y so the mast will fit inside of the y . once everything is ready i put some slack in the port and starboard shrouds and then detach the fore stay . stand by the mast and untie the line and start feeding the line through the rescue 8 and lower it into the mast support . once it is in there pull some slack in the line and pull the pin out of the deck plate carefully pull the base of the mast to the bow pulpuit once it is there i have a mast support that the mast and spreaders fit in . mast is removed from y support and rest on stern pulpuit

the rescue 8 with ears gives enough friction you will have to feed the line
 

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Okume Joe
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23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the information Southern Spirit.

Although I am not sure how to use a rescue 8 nor have one at present, I think that you are attaching the halyards to it and it is attached to a D ring attached to a strap tied to the trailer. Is the climbing rope threaded onto the rescue 8 hooks and used as a friction point for raising and lowering?

Does the strap act as a gin pole? Or by having a tall stern mounted mast support you may not need a gin pole. Is this the idea?

thanks,
dthriftusa
 

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Okume Joe
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23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Southern Spirit and Denise030,

The pictures are a great help and the video too. I'll post a reply when I get the boat pulled. I don't have a tongue extension and will need the boat lifted onto the trailer. Unfortunately the lift has a busted hydraulic hose, which will give me time to setup a system for mast lowering/raising. We like you are in the deep freeze right now anyway.

best regards,
 

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Okume Joe
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23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all of the advice. We had a lovely weekend last and I finally got my boat lifted onto the trailer. I need a tongue extension before I can use the ramp. Otherwise my truck's cab fills with water.

I cobbled up a gin pole using an 80" 2x4, 2 eye bolts and a 2 large woodworking clamps. Added the eye bolts to one end 180 degrees apart and shimmed out the other end slightly undersized for the mast thickness. Next added 1/2" thick oak planks on each side extending back about 11" past the 2x4. At this point all pieces were screwed together.

Next, I slid the gin pole's oak side extensions over the mast and used two woodworking clamps to clamp the oak boards behind the mast. Nice and snug.
Connect two halyards to the upper eye bolt and the mainsheet tackle to the lower eye bolt. The ratchet end connected to the stem fitting.
With a helper gently guided the mast onto an 8' 2x4 mast crutch with a foot crossbeam the width of the cockpit floor. It was tied to the upper rail and secured with line between two stanchions preventing sliding. Next time I will use two rope guy lines to keep the mast centered if a helper is not available.

The only problem I had was that my mainsheet was about 10' too short. I had to take the line out of one sheave to be able to lower the mast all the way to the crutch. Or possibly use a longer crutch.

This 23K showed no signs of blisters anywhere even after being in the water 2.5 years. I'll dry her out and add new barrier coat to any exposed glass then new bottom paint, do some other repairs, move both batteries to the bow and back into the water she goes. Here is a picture link if you haven't seen a 23k.

https://plus.google.com/photos/116081365969363846969/albums/6106869770883783985?authkey=CIT3zbjzl9y_8AE[/URL]
 

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Freedom isn't free
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3,284 Posts
I always like the spirit 23... it always seemed to be a lot of boat for the size. I bet it sails quite well too.

No question if you create an extendable/raisable mast support, it'll make it all easy as pie. I used to use 2 different mast supports on my Capri 25... I used a "mast upper" for my Capri 22 (which might work on the Spirit, but the angled transom might preclude it)... the Mast upper was neat (and you can easily make your own, no need to buy), becuase it was tubular steel... and had a simple pin system to extend/retract it.

Mast Upper in down position.

Mast upper in UP position


I made my own mast upper for my S2 7.9... used (3) 2x4s... then setup make-shift gudgeons using eye-bolts (the S2 is backward, in that the pintles are on the transome, and gudgeons on the rudder)... but anyway, I installed 3 eye-bolts, to slide over the pintles to create 2 separate height positions for my home made mast upper... a down/travel position, and an UP/Mast Raising position... hopefully you can figure it out by looking at this...
Up position:

travel position


here is a side shot of it, sitting on one of the pintles...


I can't take FULL credit for that design, the prior owner had something similar, except the mast on the S2 7.9 (26 footer) is pretty heavy (probably 90+ lbs)... and he used a single 2x4 to support the mast, turned sideways, and 2x4s are notoriously weak in that direction... which is why I put all the heavy work on my 2x4s fore/aft... and gave width to them by bolting them together with a 2x4 spacer. NOPE it's not light, bu then it's strong enough to stand on the mast if you need to now. Because of this rig, I can raise and lower the mast myself, using my A-frame. I prefer an A-frame (and some will chastise me for this).... because it doesnt' require much balance to raise the mast then. With the A-frame, fixed and vertical, I put the mainsheet between the apex of the a-frame and the spinnaker ring (tied around the mast about at the spreaders would work too)... and I can then just sheet in with 1 hand, and steer with the other as the mast comes up... it's a pretty relaxed mast raising (or lowering) then.

here's a better shot of how I did on my Capri 25... Boy I turn some heads when I showed up solo with THAT boat and rigged it... I actually had about 5 people watching how I did it the last time I rigged.
 

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Nice boat, It's interesting to see the fin keel version.

Oh, and on topic I posted a bit about my mast raising system here: http://www.sailnet.com/forums/965690-post15.html

The gist of it is I installed a couple stanchion fairleads on the stanchions in line with the pivot point of the mast (stanchions are already lined up well) and a mast eye on the past about 6 feet up. I have 2 lines with clips on either end. These server to stabilize the mast side to side as I raise it. Then I have a 2x4 with a small winch and an eyelet on it. I attach the jib halyard (and the forestay just to keep it where it needs to be) and the winch cable attaches to the bow cleat. Just wind up the winch and up comes the mast. With the sidelines its stable enough to leave it and untangle the inevitable times when the back stay or side stays get caught on something.
 
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