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Some of the new injectables will keep up to 90 days without refrigeration, and refrigerated, the shelf life is nearly twice that, 180 days. So there's not a problem with injectables. Oral medications, of which there are many, have varied shelf life, often shortened if stored in a warm, humid location. I would suggest storing the meds in a sealed, plastic box with some sort of moisture absorbing crystals to prevent shortening the shelf life.

Also, depending on the degree of your diabetes, you may find that your increased level of exercise, and dietary changes may lessen your dependence upon medications by a significant margin. I have witnessed this first hand with several friends during the past few years, friends that were injecting themselves daily with insulin, and now they no longer take any medications at all. In each case I've personally seen, the big change in dietary intake and increased exercise made a huge difference in just a few weeks. Therefore, it is extremely important to keep a tight reign on your blood sugar measurements and do them at least once a day. It's not uncommon for some patients to undergo those changes in lifestyle, only to find they're overdosing themselves with insulin.

Play it safe - the world will still be there when you arrive,

Gary :cool:
 

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Most medications are over the counter in nearly every country outside the United States. And, the cost is relatively low in comparison. There's a very good reason there is a drug store on every corner of the U.S. - money! The profit margin on drugs in the U.S. is insanely high.

Gary :cool:
 
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