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Owned by Velcro
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756 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was out fishing Yesterday when I got a TXT from my better half. Apparently this turnip go fast boater just cut across the ICW at full open throttle, hit the oyster bank and sort of jumped it and then ended up in the sea food with a rather abrupt stop. No one got hurt other then the pride of the "skipper" and a few dozen oysters. The dragged his sorry butt of at 0100 at high tide.



ATB

Michael
 

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Administrator
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Glad he wasn't hurt. I wonder what he was thinking?
 

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Wandering Aimlessly
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I wonder what he was thinking?
Whenever you have to ask the question, the answer is, he wasn't thinking.
 
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Master Mariner
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Who needs IQ tests? Just put somebody through the average "safe boating course" and set them loose in the ICW, 6 months later. Hello, Mr. Darwin.
 

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Old enough to know better
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4,346 Posts
Glad he wasn't hurt. I wonder what he was thinking?
Or what was he drinking? That is what bothers me more about power boats is the drinking that typically goes on on board.

And I don't mind drinking, and in fact have been known to drink way to much myself, but I don't drink while boating. Wait till you are at your destination or do it in moderation. Most of the power boat accidents on the Hudson River that have fatalities involve drinking. Really sad, seems we loose someone every year, weird thing is often the one steering the boat survives. Then you hear all the stories of what a good person he was and there must be someone else that caused the boat to hit a lighted stationary barge at full throttle.
 

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Registered
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A few years ago about 2AM on a foggy night I wake up to the loud roar of a cigarette boat engine. Look out, yea, we might have 50 ft vis.

The pitch of the boat engine suddenly goes wicked high for a minute, then silent. I'm sure that was good for the power plant. The next morning the cigarette sat in all it's glory hanging from the top of a sand dune 100ft from waters edge, achieving at least 20' above mean sea level on the altimeter. The owner was no were to be found.

It was quite the tourist attraction the next day.
 

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Owned by Velcro
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756 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The scary thing is, that this is supposed to be a pro ..... he had 5 or 6 passengers on board and that is not a shifting sand bar but on old established oyster bank and if he had been 50 or so feet to port, he would have piled into marker 13 .... the one that has the NO WAKE sign on it. I bet his passengers did not expect for their trip to come to such a sudden halt less then a minute away from the dock at that speed. :confused::confused:

ATB

Michael
 

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Was the oyster farm properly marked?
The low tide photo doesnt show you what it looks like awash.
I cant see any markers or pilings...

Just because its marked on a chart it still needs to be clearly marked physically.
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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7,496 Posts
Personally, I think that turnips should take offense to being lumped in to the same category as this guy...
 

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Owned by Velcro
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756 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Was the oyster farm properly marked?
The low tide photo doesnt show you what it looks like awash.
I cant see any markers or pilings...

Just because its marked on a chart it still needs to be clearly marked physically.
That bank is made up of near white oyster shells and is about 2 inches deep at high tide, so you can see it from half a mile away. Marker 13 ( red flashing ) with a BIG ass No Wake sign on it is right at the end of it. How much more marking do you need? It is outside of the ICW at the end of the nature reserve of Pinkney Island. This turnip plowed over 150 feet into it at the speed he was going. Marker 13 is just outside to the left of the picture I took.
 

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Captain Obvious
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Or what was he drinking? That is what bothers me more about power boats is the drinking that typically goes on on board.

Most of the power boat accidents on the Hudson River that have fatalities involve drinking. QUOTE]

I think that's government propoganda to justify new patrol boats. Not saying it doesn't ever happen, but I am saying that statistically its a very small number. Numerically more people fall down and give themselves a concussion than die in boating accidents on the Hudson.Yet we pay for ( and have to deal with) patrol boat after patrol boat.
 

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Dirt Free
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And I don't mind drinking, and in fact have been known to drink way to much myself, but I don't drink while boating. Wait till you are at your destination or do it in moderation. Most of the power boat accidents on the Hudson River that have fatalities involve drinking. Really sad, seems we loose someone every year, weird thing is often the one steering the boat survives. Then you hear all the stories of what a good person he was and there must be someone else that caused the boat to hit a lighted stationary barge at full throttle.
Come to PCYC this summer for the LO300, a 300 mile, 2-3 day, non-stop sailboat race around Lake Ontario. 150 sailboats and 450 dock carts full of liquor and beer. Powerboaters ain't the only idiots on the water. I know the local marine police quite well and they tell me it's just too big a hassle to stop and board a sailboat so they rarely do it. If they did I'm quite sure there would be as many sailors charged with DUI as power boaters.
 

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Old enough to know better
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Come to PCYC this summer for the LO300, a 300 mile, 2-3 day, non-stop sailboat race around Lake Ontario. 150 sailboats and 450 dock carts full of liquor and beer. Powerboaters ain't the only idiots on the water. I know the local marine police quite well and they tell me it's just too big a hassle to stop and board a sailboat so they rarely do it. If they did I'm quite sure there would be as many sailors charged with DUI as power boaters.
True, but there is a significant difference between something going perhaps 7 knots, and going 70. If a sailboat hits a well lit stationary barge in the night, you don't normally have loss of life, unless someone is too drunk to swim. In a runabout running along at full throttle it is a miracle if anyone survives.
 
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