SailNet Community banner
21 - 40 of 49 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
3,548 Posts
Reaction score
492
Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Wow that is great news! was he still in his boat and they could not find it? That is not encouraging.
I cannot find the details. I am sure tomorrow the details will be available. Nothing was mentioned about the sailboat. The original story was he had a kayak on the boat- maybe he was in that. He did call out on the VHF this morning and that is how he got rescued. Not sure if it was a hand held unit or not. The CG here has antennas on mountains and they can receive signals from many miles away if conditions are right.

I hope Ron gets a PLB and maybe one of the new Standard VHF's with built in GPS and DISC. Like these:

STANDARD HORIZON GX1700 Compact VHF Radio with Built-In GPS | West Marine

ACR ELECTRONICS ResQLink+ Buoyant Personal Locator Beacon | West Marine

or a hand held:
http://www.westmarine.com/buy/stand...ting-handheld-vhf-with-built-in-gps--11029907
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,548 Posts
Reaction score
492
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Word is that Robert Redford is flying to Hawaii as we post. He wants to film the sequel to "All is Lost". The rumor is in Part II, Robert does fix the VHF and the call to the CG goes through. Robert needs to meet with Ron to sign off on the movie rights.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,170 Posts
Reaction score
1,630
That is great news. He must have stopped the leak, or at least slowed it down. I wonder if the leak was related to his rudder, as he was apparently unable to sail.
 

· Freedom isn't free
Joined
·
3,327 Posts
Reaction score
1,266

· Registered
Joined
·
3,548 Posts
Reaction score
492
Discussion Starter · #28 · (Edited)
Story in todays paper:
Missing boater found 64 miles south of Oahu Hawaii News, Honolulu, Honolulu News, Sports, Editorial, Features, Travel and Business - Honolulu Star-Advertiser - Hawaii Newspaper

Friends of a Molokai fisherman are scrapping plans for a memorial service now that he was rescued after going missing at sea for nearly two weeks.

Ron Ingraham, 67, radioed for help through a VHF channel about 8 a.m. Tuesday, and the guided-missile destroyer USS Paul Hamilton, which was about 14 miles away, reached him about an hour later, 64 miles south of Oahu.

"He was hungry, tired and a little bit weak," said Coast Guard Lt. Scott Carr. "I don't think he had eaten in a little while."

Ingraham, who was also dehydrated, was recovering Tuesday aboard the Hawaii-based destroyer, the Coast Guard said.

Carr said Ingraham's 25-foot sailboat, Malia, was intact, and rescuers were trying to repair its outboard motor to allow Ingraham to continue on his own to Molokai, where he lives on his boat in the harbor.

He said there wasn't enough wind for Ingraham to sail back.

"Unbelievable," said Ingraham's friend and commercial fisherman Dedric Manaba, who had tried to remain hopeful during the Coast Guard search touched off by a radioed call for help on Thanksgiving Day. "This is awesome."

Manaba said he was preparing fliers for a memorial service set to take place in the Kaunakakai Harbor slip where Ingraham docks his boat.

Friends described Ingraham as a longtime fisherman who often fishes off Lanai and sells his fish on the island.

"I can't wait to talk to him," Manaba said. "I just want to hear what happened."

Carr said he didn't know the specifics on how Ingraham survived 12 days at sea after his first mayday call. He said rescuers plan to debrief Ingraham.

Ingraham radioed for help at about 8 a.m. on Nov. 27, saying his boat was taking on water and in danger of sinking. He reported being 46 miles west of Kailua-Kona before his VHF radio communication cut off, prompting a Coast Guard search in severe weather.

A Coast Guard HC-130 airplane crew reached the place Ingraham reported to be in about an hour, but couldn't find any sign of the sailboat.

The 87-foot Coast Guard cutter Ahi, which also launched the first day, was forced to turn around because of strong winds and rough seas.

The Coast Guard continued searching by air with the HC-130 airplane and an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter, while Navy crews assisted with a P-3 Orion aircraft.

The search was suspended Dec. 1 after the Coast Guard and Navy conducted 59 sorties and covered 12,000 square miles without finding any sign of Ingraham.

The five-day search cost the Coast Guard at least $486,600, according to asset operating rates. The Coast Guard provided the following breakdown: $4,959 an hour for 62 hours operating the MH-65 Dolphin helicopter, $9,535 an hour for 18 hours flying the HC-130, and $1,252 an hour for six hours operating the cutter Ahi.

The cost of flying the P-3 Orion aircraft for 14 hours was not immediately available.

Carr said the standard rates are used to calculate the cost of hoax calls or for billing of non-rescue missions. He said the Coast Guard's mission is to protect those in danger on the sea, and that the service's operating budget includes the cost of rescue missions.

"At the end of the day, you have a mariner who was found alive and safe at sea," he said. "It's a positive outcome."

Carr encouraged mariners to protect themselves by having onboard an emergency position indicating radio beacon, or EPIRB, which sends out a constant signal when activated.

In another story a week back it said Ron had won his boat in a poker game. This is one lucky man.

Ron, if you see this, send me a PM. I will buy you a PLB for Christmas.
Aloha
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,033 Posts
Reaction score
458
ALOHA, Ron and U.S.S. Paul Hamilton,

WELL DONE!!!!!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,548 Posts
Reaction score
492
Discussion Starter · #30 ·
This story seems to be the most accurate- lots of miss-information out there:

Boater missing since Thanksgiving found alive, 64 miles south of Honolulu | KHON2

Boater missing since Thanksgiving found alive, 64 miles south of Honolulu

By Nestor Garcia and Web Staff Published: December 9, 2014, 10:56 am | Updated: December 9, 2014, 7:14 pm

A boater who had been missing since Nov. 27 was found alive and uninjured Tuesday aboard his 25-foot sailing vessel 64 miles south of Honolulu.

Ron Ingraham, 67, was last heard from when he placed two Mayday calls Nov. 27, saying his vessel, the "Malia," was taking on water and in danger of sinking 46 miles west of Kailua-Kona.

The Coast Guard believes Ingraham was sailing alone from Kaunakakai Harbor to Manele Bay on Lanai when he made those calls on Thanksgiving.

Search crews responded to where they believed the calls were initiated. The initial search in difficult weather and sea conditions covered about 12,000 square miles, but there was no sign of Ingraham or his vessel.

The search for Ingraham was suspended on Dec. 1.

Then on Tuesday, Coast Guard watchstanders at Sector Honolulu Command Center received a short Mayday call at 7:55 a.m. from Ingraham.

The call lasted for just a few seconds, but it was enough for the Coast Guard and the Navy to scramble to the rescue.

"With our equipment, we were able to basically use direction finding equipment, we were able to d-f the signal, and trace him to where he was," said Lt. G. Scott Carr, deputy of external affairs with the 14th Coast Guard District.

The USS Paul Hamilton, a Navy guided missile destroyer, was nearby and rushed to the scene, while the Coast Guard sent a C-130, a Dolphin helicopter and the USCGS Cutter Kiska to join in the effort.

Officials say Ingraham was weak, hungry and dehydrated when he was brought on board the Navy vessel.

"He got a shower, which, if you know, spending time at sea, it's really nice to get the salt water off of you," said Carr. "He got some food and water. He's okay."

Ingraham's fishing buddy, Dedric Manaba, heard the good news from the Coast Guard while he was out fishing off Molokai.

A relieved Manaba offered this advice for his friend: "I'm going to tell him maybe you should go fishing with me more often and stop fishing with that little sailboat, kind of dangerous."

The rescue team is attempting to fix Malia's engine, since the weather and sea conditions are not good for the boat to use its sail.

If the engine cannot be fixed at sea, the Coast Guard will either tow Malia to Honolulu or to Ingraham's home island of Molokai
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,548 Posts
Reaction score
492
Discussion Starter · #31 ·
All's well that ends well:

Son to reunite with dad found after 12 days at sea - Hawaii News - Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Son to reunite with dad found after 12 days at sea
POSTED: 10:59 a.m. HST, Dec 10, 2014
LAST UPDATED: 01:50 p.m. HST, Dec 10, 2014

ASSOCATED PRESS

The estranged son of a 67-year-old Hawaii fisherman rescued after 12 days at sea says the ordeal has motivated him to reunite with the man after not speaking to him since the 1990s.

His father, Ron Ingraham, arrived Wednesday on the Hawaiian island of Molokai, where he lives on his boat that was towed to shore by the Coast Guard.

He was found dehydrated and hungry Tuesday after being missing since Thanksgiving, when the Coast Guard picked up his first mayday call. He radioed that he was in danger of sinking nearly 50 miles from the Big Island.

Coast Guard officials sought to contact his next of kin, son Zakary Ingraham, 43, in Missouri. They were unable to reach him until the following Monday, the day they decided to suspend the search.

"It's tough to put into words," Zakary Ingraham said in a phone interview Wednesday from St. Joseph, Missouri, as his father was en route to Molokai.

"You're crushed, and you don't know what to do," he said. "And of course, I'm in Missouri so that made it feel worse I couldn't go out and look for him. It was horrible."

Complicating his feelings was a wave of regret for all the years of lost contact and the fact that his father never met a grandson, 8.

"I always wanted to find him and get in touch with him," Zakary Ingraham said. But his father lives on a boat, subsists off fishing and has no known email address or cellphone number.

"We didn't really have a falling out," the son said. "We just kind of grew apart."

Zakary Ingraham lived in Kealakekua on the Big Island until age 7, when his parents split and he moved to the mainland with his mother.

He recalled pleading with the Coast Guard to extend the search: "I held on to hope. I knew my dad was tough. So I didn't feel like he was gone."

For Coast Guard officials, calling off a search is the hardest choice they have to make, Lt. Scott Carr said.

"You're making a decision to stop searching when you don't have a resolution," he said. "We searched for five days. ... We used every resource we had, and we weren't able to find him."

As the days wore on, Zakary Ingraham resigned himself to accepting his dad was gone.

And then he got a call Tuesday that his father was found.

"At first it didn't register," Zakary Ingraham said. He recalled picturing a floating life jacket on his lifeless father, thinking they must have found him dead.

"They said, 'He's alive,'" he said. "You might as well be on a Broadway show jumping up and clicking your heels, I was so happy."

In the days since, Zakary Ingraham has tried to learn more about his father. He said he reached a fellow Molokai fisherman who told him his dad had set out for the island of Lanai, where he planned to sell his fish.

The Coast Guard had no details yet about what went wrong on Ron Ingraham's boat or how he survived so long at sea.

"To my knowledge he didn't require any medical attention, other than he was tired, hungry and dehydrated," Carr said.

Efforts by The Associated Press to reach Ron Ingraham through the Coast Guard on Wednesday were unsuccessful.

A Navy ship was nearby when the Coast Guard received Ron Ingraham's mayday Tuesday. Crew members from that vessel, guided-missile destroyer USS Paul Hamilton, gave him water and food.

"It's the holidays. We all have family who we love and miss, being here stationed far away from the continental U.S.," Carr said. "Anytime we rescue a mariner is a great day."

Zakary Ingraham said he's trying to get a loan so he can afford to travel to Hawaii to see his father.

"When I see my dad, I'm going to give him a big hug," he said. "I'm going to do everything I can to get out there as soon as possible."
 

· Glad I found Sailnet
Joined
·
3,844 Posts
Reaction score
640
From one of the videos of him back on land, he said: "I'm a little dazed right now and I'm headed to the bar"

Regards,
Brad
 
  • Like
Reactions: casey1999

· Registered
Joined
·
3,548 Posts
Reaction score
492
Discussion Starter · #34 · (Edited)
Robert Redford has decided the sequel to "All Is Lost" will be called "All Was Won" and based on Ron's story. Seeing Ron won his sailboat in a poker game and he fixed the VHF and now the boat is back in safe harbor, Ron did win.

Hawaii News, Honolulu, Honolulu News, Sports, Editorial, Features, Travel and Business - Honolulu Star-Advertiser - Hawaii Newspaper
Fish and grit helped man survive at sea
A storm set the Molokai resident's boat adrift, and he spent 12 days on the ocean before his rescue

By Rob Shikina
POSTED: 01:30 a.m. HST, Dec 11, 2014

Ron Ingraham, 67, was found dehydrated and hungry after going missing on Thanksgiving, when the Coast Guard picked up his mayday call saying his boat was in danger of sinking. A second call more than a week later ultimately resulted in his rescue.

Molokai fisherman Ron Ingraham, who was rescued after 12 days at sea, is getting some needed rest, but could head back out to sea in a few days.

Ingraham's friend Dedric Manaba, who also is a commercial fisherman, said Ingraham expressed interest in going fishing with him in a few days. But this time it would be on Mana*ba's 34-foot fishing boat with powerful motors, compared to Ingraham's 25-foot sailboat, Malia, which has only a small engine.

"That would scar me for life," Manaba said about Ingraham's ordeal at sea. "He's a tough guy. Most guys would have cracked."

Ingraham, 67, and his sailboat, which is also his home, returned to Kaunakakai Harbor at 8:50 a.m. Wednesday with the assistance of the Coast Guard.

He saluted the Navy and the Coast Guard for his rescue, which was prompted by his mayday call after he made makeshift repairs to get a radio working.

"I was trying to maintain a positive attitude and not give up," he told the Honolulu Star-Advertiser in a telephone interview from Molokai on Wednesday afternoon. "It was difficult. The last three or four days, I thought that was it. I was getting weaker by the day."

He said he ate raw ahi and mahimahi he caught, chewing on the bones and skin and eating an eyeball for hydration.

"The fish saved me," he said.

Ingraham had been missing since Nov. 27, when his first mayday call was picked up by the Coast Guard, prompting a five-day search by the Coast Guard and Navy southwest of Maui. The 12,000-square-mile aerial search ended Dec. 1 without any sign of Ingraham.

On Tuesday morning, the Coast Guard received another mayday call from Ingraham and the nearby guided-missile destroyer USS Paul Hamilton rescued Ingraham 64 miles south of Honolulu.

Ingraham, who often fishes off Lanai and sells his fish on the island, said his ordeal began just before dark on Nov. 25 when he rushed to get his boat out of Lanai's Kaumalapau Harbor before severe weather could smash it against the rocks.

Ingraham paddled out on his kayak and cut the mooring ropes in his rush to leave the harbor. He planned to head around the island and seek refuge inside Lanai's Manele Harbor.

"All night long, I fought the current and the weather, and I'm going backwards," he said. "I couldn't make it."

Surrounded by 15-foot seas and life-threatening conditions, Ingraham decided to run with the storm, letting the northeasterly wind take him south of Lanai.

During the storm, a rogue wave hit the side of his boat, throwing him overboard and dipping his mast into water, soaking his radio antenna.

The boat righted itself and Ingraham, who had tied himself to the craft, climbed aboard.

Over two days the winds pushed him hundreds of miles, he estimated, southwest of Hawaii island.

On Nov. 27, Ingraham radioed for help, saying his boat was in danger of sinking, and gave GPS coordinates that indicated he was 46 miles west of Kailua-Kona.

Ingraham said he didn't know anyone heard his call and said the GPS coordinates from his GPS device turned out to be inaccurate.

But the Coast Guard did hear the call and arrived on scene in an hour, battling severe weather that forced an 87-foot Coast Guard cutter to turn around.

After a couple days trying to figure out which way to go, Ingraham headed into the tradewinds, hoping that would take him toward the islands.

"I had to go uphill," he said. "I couldn't sleep. I was just too busy the whole time fighting the elements and trying to go upwind in my sailboat."

It took him nearly two weeks, and two days before his rescue, the winds died, leaving him becalmed.

He couldn't climb his mast to fix the antenna, so he tried to fix his radio.

"I got a piece of coat hanger and copper wire and stuck it right in the unit and put it out the door," he said. "The lady on watch on that destroyer picked up the blip."

He said the rescuers used the blip to triangulate his location.

"Those guys are like real live heroes," he said of his rescuers.

After Ingraham returned, his friend Manaba gave him an emergency beacon called an EPIRB that sends out a constant signal once activated so he would never find himself in a similar situation.

Manaba said he wished Ingraham would have called him because he could have towed him back to shore with his fishing boat.

"He's been blessed," Manaba said.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,548 Posts
Reaction score
492
Discussion Starter · #35 · (Edited)
When found, how far was he from the original position where his first distress call was made?
I would estimate he was found about 100 nm east of the search area. Ron said his gps gave the wrong long/lad when he made his first mayday call to CG. And the search area was based on the given long/lad.

What I do not understand, and maybe someone could explain. I thought the cg could get a rough estimate on your location with just the VHF signal through either triangulation or at a minimum using direction finding to at least get direction of the signal. That would at least confirm if the given long/lad makes sense. Apparently his most recent mayday was picked up by a navy ship that was a few miles away. From reports that ship used direction finding equipment to locate Ron from the mayday call. Other reports say the cg first herd the latest mayday call- a lot of miss-information out there.

Here is are CG "Rescue 21" details:

http://www.uscg.mil/acquisition/rescue21/

"Rescue 21 is operational along the entire Atlantic, Pacific and Gulf coasts of the continental United States as well as along the shores of the Great Lakes, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, and the Northern Marianas Islands, covering approximately 41,871 miles of coastline. The system was accepted at Sector Buffalo Aug. 22, 2012."

This pdf states the Rescue 21 is only good 20 miles out from land- so maybe that is the problem:

http://www.uscg.mil/acquisition/rescue21/pdf/rescue21.pdf

Can the CG get your rough location or at least a DF heading to where your VHF signal is coming from?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,170 Posts
Reaction score
1,630
I would estimate he was found about 100 nm east of the search area. Ron said his gps gave the wrong long/lad when he made his first mayday call to CG. And the search area was based on the given long/lad.
Thanks. That makes sense. Looks like he was just drifting during that time, which is peculiar, as his mast was intact. Maybe his halyard fell out of the mast head and he was unable to hoist up the mainsail. But what about headsail? Or maybe he just did not want to move much to improve the odds of CG finding him? I think there is a lot more to this story we don't yet know about.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,548 Posts
Reaction score
492
Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Thanks. That makes sense. Looks like he was just drifting during that time, which is peculiar, as his mast was intact. Maybe his halyard fell out of the mast head and he was unable to hoist up the mainsail. But what about headsail? Or maybe he just did not want to move much to improve the odds of CG finding him? I think there is a lot more to this story we don't yet know about.
This is my guess based on what Ron says and what I know of the wind strength and direction. Go to this site and go to the detailed map of Hawaii and then run the animation on the wind speed/direction:

Sailing Weather - Marine Weather Forecasts for Sailors and Adventurers - PassageWeather

Now Ron says he first left Molokai heading for anchorage at Lanai. He says he went around the back side of Lanai. Once he starts getting around the back side he would then be exposed to the open channel winds and currents between Maui and Lanai. He says he hit strong winds and seas and then just ran bare poles for a number of days. He says the storm carried him many miles- which is perfectly possible. He also says after the high winds abated, he started to sail up wind. If this is what happened, he would have ended up south of Oahu, which is where the reports said he was- about 60 miles south of Oahu. The strong trades could have blown him in a south west direction and the his up wind sail would be pretty much due north to take him where he was found. His trip could have been something like 400 miles. Note that the last few days we have not had much wind- and that is why he was becalmed when rescued. One tough dude and quite a sailor in my opinion.
 

· Beyond The Pale
Joined
·
300 Posts
Reaction score
173
Just as a matter of curiosity, what Make and Model of boat did he have?
It looked to me like a "Character" boat with that Bow, but it seems to be well built; it made it back to Port, and the USGS didn't sink it as they sometimes do.

Erindipity
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,548 Posts
Reaction score
492
Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Just as a matter of curiosity, what Make and Model of boat did he have?
It looked to me like a "Character" boat with that Bow, but it seems to be well built; it made it back to Port, and the USGS didn't sink it as they sometimes do.

Erindipity
Someone previously posted Bayfield 25- looks like that's it:
https://bayfield25.wordpress.com/

The Bayfield 25

The Bayfield 25 is a high quality, Canadian built, traditional, Ted Gozzard designed pocket cruiser. Sloop rig, clipper bow with bowsprit, full keel with protected rudder, Yanmar diesel engine, spacious salon with standing headroom, and enclosed head.
 

· Old enough to know better
Joined
·
4,354 Posts
Reaction score
1,200
Just as a matter of curiosity, what Make and Model of boat did he have?
It looked to me like a "Character" boat with that Bow, but it seems to be well built; it made it back to Port, and the USGS didn't sink it as they sometimes do.

Erindipity
I believe it was a Bayfield, while they are as much made to look salty they are are well built.

Hey not to minimize what this guy went through, if you are in the islands would you not keep many days worth of rations on your boat, just in case? I understand say someone in the Chesapeake not, after all from most spots you could walk to shore, but around the islands it does not take much to go wrong before you are drifting around in the middle of nowhere. When I get out there (yes it is in the works) I will be sure the dry storage is filled to brim with food, and water tanks are full of fresh water. Even if I don't normally drink tank water I am sure if it is sanitary it would be welcome after a few days out there! He just did not seem very well prepared.

Looks like Casey and I were posting at the same time!
 
21 - 40 of 49 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top