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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, so in vermont there is a sailboat shipping company; they ship local food without any fossil fuels.

So why don't more people do that? I know it would be dependent on ship size and weight restrictions but I imagine plenty of inhabited islands need regular LTL goods. I live in Long Beach, and Catalina Island has more people than space for farms, so I'm sure they need food daily, lol.

There are traditional shipping companies that charge $300-600 a ton 1 way, I imagine a "green" option could manage 20-40% higher shipping natural foods and whatnot. Even if you could only manage 1 ton of loose goods in your boat each way it'd be 200/hr for sailing (plus load/unload); beats a day job.

Do you think there are laws that make it not worth the trouble? If this IS a thing how do you look into it? I know there are LTL freight sites for trucks, but not boats.
 

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This post made no sense to me.....especially the math.....not to mention not mentioning the name of the sailboat shipping company . Like a non-info post......& if I understand what you ambiguously wrote ......someone could charge 20-40 % higher for this . I grasped that you were suggesting it might be a good idea.....& then it all went South.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
1. The company is a traditional (meaning engine based) shipping company named catalina freight, I didn't mention the name because the idea that it would matter is nonsensical. I did the work of finding out how much they charge for shipping and then posted it HERE n the "info" of the post so you wouldn't have to go digging; a post that requires you to google would be a "non-info post".

2. The price increase hardly counts as "ambiguous", in California many people will pay a premium to have a lower carbon footprint, and a sailboat uses considerably less. "Green" alternatives to traditional industries (shipping, farming, energy) routinely charge 20-40% more to provide similar services or goods on the grounds that they're ALSO providing the service of "not damaging the planet", which has value to many people; it's pretty basic marketing.

3. (600*1.3)/4=~200. is the math really that complicated?
 

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There's a weekly barge of shipping containers filled with groceries for Avalon that returns filled with garbage. Two Harbors has a landing craft for the weekly grocery run, probably cheaper by the ton that way.
 

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personally, i think that the fact that sailing is making a come back in shipping, large scale or small, is great. if you think about it, sailing, which was the shipping high tech of the world for a loooong time, hasn't been relegated to simply pleasure boating for all that long. now, only a century after sail was ousted by steam, it's returning as the tech of tomorrow. that's pretty awesome.

as far as the OP's original question: i think you don't see more of it because more people haven't been willing or able to invest their money in a 'new' technology:D seriously, though. it seems as if sail transport may be the wave of tomorrow but, today, it's a new trend and it takes people of vision to be willing to take a chance on a budding 'new' trend. give it time and you may be surprised.
 

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The wind doesn't always blow. There is a reason powered ships took over.

I love the free market. If there are people who would pay more for a slower, less reliable form of transportation, under the guise of reducing their carbon footprint, that's great.

However, I think there are too many people that either unfortunately don't care or more pragmatically don't believe this will have any impact on climate change whatsoever. They aren't climate change deniers, they deny that reducing human consumption will have any measurable impact on the change going forward.
 

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"If this IS a thing how do you look into it? "

Let's cut to the chase.

You need to check with the municipalities concerned (both sides), and the counties, and the Bear Republic itself, what regulations apply to shipping or delivery companies operating strictly IN state. Unless you plan to cross state lines, and everything changes.

Then you find out IF there's dockage or a landing you can unload from.

Then you do your basic marketing surveys, to find out if anyone on that island is willing to pay you for "green" deliveries, and what they would pay for it.

Then you have to consider, how many of them actually will pony up and pay. And how you'll arrange to pickup and deliver, and make sure someone pays for the goods, possibly before you pick them up?

And whether you can get any contracts or subscriptions going, so you don't starve from week to week.

And what it will cost to keep your commercial boats running. Boats, plural, because you can't skip a week while you are down for maintenance, can you?

And whether those existing companies might follow the old Teamster tradition, and either break your legs or sink your boat, for competing on their turf. That's another fine nautical tradition as well.

Just an ordinary business plan.
 

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I must not be hung over enough to read clearly. I'd swear that article says the sailing barge they built sailed down from Shoreham, VT to Manhattan, sticking along the Manhattan coast while southbound, which would put them head-on into commercial traffic and on the wrong side of the river under the usual "keep to the right" scheme of things.

OK, I can see building a new sailing barge in order to make it easier to drop the masts and escape Lake Champlain. But SAILING all the way down from LC through Albany and the Hudson? And then trying to SAIL all the way up again?

Even before all the obstructions were built into the upper part of that route, sailors sometimes had to just anchor and wait for days on end. I'll give them great credit for making it through the first year if they do that without an engine.
 

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From their web site, seems there last AIS position was in June/July of 2013 and their comments as to "we will plan the 2014 season with a greater or lesser program of activity. We are committed to doing at least one voyage in 2014 in any event. " in the future tense, imply they haven't operated since then?

Maritime Sleuth needed!
 

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OK, not sure if this has come up yet, but how about using your boat as a retreat space for creative or searching folk. There's lots of "retreats" out there for writers/artists/spiritual-searchers/etc. Some people travel all over the globe to inhabit these places for a short periods. Has anyone tried using their boat in this way?

I'm thinking that when we are anchored or moored for weeks or months at a time, we might be able to tap into this market. It would be targeted at the more adventurous types, and we'd probably have to be careful about how we structure the finances so as to not run afoul of local regulations.
 

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OK, not sure if this has come up yet, but how about using your boat as a retreat space for creative or searching folk. There's lots of "retreats" out there for writers/artists/spiritual-searchers/etc. Some people travel all over the globe to inhabit these places for a short periods. Has anyone tried using their boat in this way?

I'm thinking that when we are anchored or moored for weeks or months at a time, we might be able to tap into this market. It would be targeted at the more adventurous types, and we'd probably have to be careful about how we structure the finances so as to not run afoul of local regulations.
are you talking about renting out your boat or setting up a charter business?
 

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are you talking about renting out your boat or setting up a charter business?
Closer to renting the boat, but I would see it more like offering a berth, and the general run of the boat. A B&B - type experience.

I have writer friends who "rent" small rooms around the globe at times. This would be more austere than that, but location matters. I could see anchoring in some semi-remote, beautiful area, and offering a rustic/rugged "experience" to some searching souls. The market would be small, but I only need a very small number to make it work.
 
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