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Picnic Sailor
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Since mentioning them in another thread a couple months ago we have now started looking very closely at Moody 425's as a potential boat for a family of 4 to do some extended cruising.

Does anyone familiar with them have an opinion or any advice?

We also like the Hallberg Rassy 45, which while a touch bigger is almost twice the price.

Any known issues we should keep an eye out for?

The reason for two European boats is that we are looking at purchasing in Europe and sailing back this way at a leisurely pace. I know there are comparable North American centre cockpit boats and they are also definitely on our list, the other factor for us is the Aus $ being the way it is at the moment our money goes further buying a boat in Euros rather than US $.
 

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We own and sail a Moody 425. We bought it in Greece and sailed the Med for a couple of years before crossing over to the Caribbean this year. We have spent lots of time and money to completely refit the boat for our purposes and we would be happy to answer any questions you might have or pm us if you like. They are great boats that are well built with very workable interior layouts that work well offshore and at anchor. They are also good sailing boats and surprise many with good passage times. We had several 170 mile plus days on our crossing without working the boat. Hard to go wrong with this design but make sure you get a good survey.
 

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Got your PM and wrote you a fairly lengthy response only to find that I don't have enough posts to PM you so if you would like to give me an email address I will forward it to you there, Cheers, Robert
 

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Super Fuzzy Moderator
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Chall .... we had a look at a Moody in NZ when we were out looking. I'd always fancied the 425 though the one we saw was big brother, somewhere around 48' from memory. Damn that was a big boat. Huge. Nonetheless if it had been the 425 I think we might well have gone for her. Even back then cheaper than our Malo and gave the impression of being a very solid gal.

Good layout, very comfortable saloon and aft cabin. Various people did make mention of some quality control problems with Moodys of that vintage.
 
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I'm not sure the people who talked about quality control were properly informed. Stories always get embellished and added to over time. The only problems I am aware of was a 39 foot Moody built in the 70's that featured an underbuilt skeg and a less than sturdy rudder that failed while crossing the Indian Ocean. You may or may not know that all Moody's were built to Loyd's of London specs and in this case Loyd's were sued as well. Seemed that someone had reduced the size of the skeg and even Loyd's were not properly informed. Anyways the customer was successful in his lawsuit and Moody, a 150 year old company did not go unpunished. (Imagine if all the owners of modern production boats that loose rudders today could successfully sue a company)

All Moody's thereafter were designed by Bill Dixon including the 425 and they featured a very large and robust 1/2 skeg and semi balanced rudder which has been almost bullet proof. I am aware of a couple of Moody's that did have rudder/skeg damage but they were both in severe groundings. I'm not aware of any failures at sea.
 

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I'm not sure the people who talked about quality control were properly informed.
Oh you may well be right, I'm only repeating what I was told. From memory the issues were more to do with general fitout than structural problems and from I saw of the bigger boat in NZ she was built like the proverbial brick outhouse. To me the 425 simply looks like a throughly competent, handsome and well thought out design, which I'd expect from a Dixon.

btw ... if I remember rightly most of the feedback I got re Moody was from the YBW forum.
 

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Yes sailing forums are sure full of information but much of it is here say and very little if any evidence to support many of the opinions expressed when it comes to boat building. The Moody's built thru the mid 80's and on actually have a very large and faithful following and have held their prices very well over the years. ( Look up the Moody's Owners Group and have a boo as I think the membership is around 2000 enthusiastic owners.)As I am sure you are very aware these boats while built very well will need refitting if they have not been really well kept up and you can spend almost the original purchase price on a refit so it really doesn't pay to buy a boat needing a lot of work thinking you may have gotten a good deal. If you buy any production boat older than 10-15 years old you can expect to also have to refit it as well so if you find a 25 year old Moody that has been recently refit it may very well be a better buy than a newer production boat. There are many well built older boats to choose from depending on your sailing needs, the Moody is just one of them.
 

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Chall .... we had a look at a Moody in NZ when we were out looking.
Hi TDW,

Was the Moody 425 called Mischief? Some friends brought a Moody 425 I believe from NZ and brought it accross to Fremantle, then crossed the Indian Ocean and cruised in thr Med. I think they sold the boat and looks like it is now in Panama. So that's at least two oceans that Mischief has crossed.

Ilenart
 

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Picnic Sailor
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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks All,

I have got your email's Robert, that is truly fantastic information, thankyou so much for taking the time. I am going through it all now and will send you back a reply and possibly a couple of questions!

TD - I have yet to meet one, but on the face of they seem to fit our needs to a tee. The layout of accommodation with the bunks in the passageway(while probably a waste for most cruising couples) suit those of us with rugrats. We also have a predisposition to centre cockpits :) The sailing attributes seem to be on the money for us as well.

Our boat shopping had become frustrating, I am basically underwhelmed by Australian boats in our size/price range. They tend to be either too old and tatty, too expensive( Bluewater 400, The Martz 46) steel or one offs. We are also looking at Peterson 44/46's, Bristols and other North American boats but if buying in the US the Aussie $ bites us now than the Euro.

Given that I don't mind the idea of cruising the med as a shakedown and then bringing a boat this way buying in Europe is starting to appeal.

Mischief was one of the boats we were considering as there was the possibility of a mid Pacific delivery, I heard it may now be off the market.
 

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I've always liked the Moody models, and would personally consider one for the OP's purpose. Be sure to check the keel bolts on older boats, here are some pictures of the bolts of an 80's version which were being replaced in the yard.
 

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I've always liked the Moody models, and would personally consider one for the OP's purpose. Be sure to check the keel bolts on older boats, here are some pictures of the bolts of an 80's version which were being replaced in the yard.
Hi There,
I'm trying to understand the picture of the keel bolts. Can you explain the wood/steel in the photos
 

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Hi There,
I'm trying to understand the picture of the keel bolts. Can you explain the wood/steel in the photos
After the nuts were removed, the keel was "dropped" by raising the hull which was then rested on the wood blocks, allowing access to the bolts. At the time I took the pictures, the hull was raised in the crane. I believe the plastic cups held penetrating liquid for soaking the bolts for removal.
 

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After the nuts were removed, the keel was "dropped" by raising the hull which was then rested on the wood blocks, allowing access to the bolts. At the time I took the pictures, the hull was raised in the crane. I believe the plastic cups held penetrating liquid for soaking the bolts for removal.
Which model and year was the boat and how did the other bolts look?
 

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I dont recall if it was a 38 or 42 but an '80s vintage. The pictures were of the two worst bolts, several others had minor erosion.
Thanks for that, its always a good idea to pull a few bolts to check them,especially on the older boats fortunately it is not too hard. These boats could loose a few bolts and still have no problems but it doesn't make sense not to have checked every few years.Still much better and stronger than stainless.
 

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Picnic Sailor
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Discussion Starter #20
We are continuing to research 425's but are now considering the Moody 44 and 42, it's more contemporary cousins.

In some ways I prefer the 425 over the 44/42 but I am not informed at all, does anyone have anything to add in terms of differences/preferences here?
 
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