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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't know how many people here have their boats on a mooring line.

I recently purchased a mooring about 1o0 yards from shore at high tide(2500 lb piece of granite with a big chain and a buoy at the top).

If you moor, I have a 19 foot West Wight Potter, that weighs in at about 1200lb soaking wet. What would be the length and the needed tensile strength of the line. It just has to handle near gale, when gale force winds are forcast small boats like mine get taken out of the water and put back on their trailers.
 

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s/v Tiger Lily
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I have mine often on a mooring. I would think you would want 1/2" pennant about 2.5 times the height of your freeboard. I'm guessing 8' long with a stainless eye.
 

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The heaviest line that will fit on your mooring cleat is what I'd use. Tensile strength? You can get 1/8" line that will lift six tons and which would break the links in your chain if you were able to pull it hard enough. You shouldn't have to worry about tensile strength. Tiger Lily sounds like he has the right idea.
 

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I agree with paulk. It's not tensile strength that's important in selecting the size.

Most pennants fail due to chafe. A larger pennant is less prone to chafe. Get the largest that will fit in your bow chock. And use good chafe gear.
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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The larger the better. Maybe get yourself some hard lay 1" three strand and splice in a s.s. thimble. Something like this:Extra Heavy Duty ThimbleYou can save a lot of $ by doing your own splicing. Chafe is always the enemy so some sort of chafe protection is essential.
 
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+1 for good chafe gear. I used pieces of old fire hose, I was living on a mooring off key west for a year, very very minimal wear. Don't forget to check that you aren't getting your lines caught and chafed on any groundtackle that you may keep on the bow, anchor rollers and such, seen that mistake made.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
+1 for good chafe gear. I used pieces of old fire hose, I was living on a mooring off key west for a year, very very minimal wear. Don't forget to check that you aren't getting your lines caught and chafed on any groundtackle that you may keep on the bow, anchor rollers and such, seen that mistake made.
How big is your boat?
 

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Bombay Explorer 44
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Remember you don't want one mooring line you want at least two and three is better.

One inch nylon for the primary with good chafe protection.
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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Remember you don't want one mooring line you want at least two and three is better.

One inch nylon for the primary with good chafe protection.
Was going to put that in my above post but thought it might open up the problem of tangling of the two lines. I've seen a lot of problems with double pennants getting wrapped below the mooring on the swivel and badly twisted into a real bird's nest when people leave their boats for long periods. Two is certainly better BUT they need to be checked on a regular basis.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Remember you don't want one mooring line you want at least two and three is better.

One inch nylon for the primary with good chafe protection.
I should think that the mooring line for a Bombay Explorer 44, which displaces 28,000 lb. would be a lot different than the mooring line for a 19 foot West Wight Potter which displaces 1200 lb.

Assuming that you purchased a Yale line and that you addressed the chaff protection(their is a protector on the line), I think that 5/8 inch line at a tensile strength of 17,000 lb. on a rectangular block of granite that weighs in at 2500 lb., would be sufficient. It seems like you would be dragging the mooring or breaking loose from the horn cleat on the bow before you broke loose from the mooring itself.

What are the group's thoughts in this condition??
 

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Bombay Explorer 44
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I should think that the mooring line for a Bombay Explorer 44, which displaces 28,000 lb. would be a lot different than the mooring line for a 19 foot West Wight Potter which displaces 1200 lb.

Assuming that you purchased a Yale line and that you addressed the chaff protection(their is a protector on the line), I think that 5/8 inch line at a tensile strength of 17,000 lb. on a rectangular block of granite that weighs in at 2500 lb., would be sufficient. It seems like you would be dragging the mooring or breaking loose from the horn cleat on the bow before you broke loose from the mooring itself.

What are the group's thoughts in this condition??
Yup maybe 1 inch line is overkill. But if your bow roller or fair lead can accommodate it, why not?
 

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Can't do it with the bow horn cleat. 5/8 is about it.
Then go with two 5/8 pennants with good chafe gear. In my club's fleet, a number of the members use 5/8 pennants and I know several that have had chafe issues. I have been using a single 1 inch pennant for 25 years and have never had a chafing problem. That's with my previous 30 footer (7000 lbs) and current 33 footer (11,000 lbs).
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
+1 Held me thru topical storm conditions.
Are you saying the Your boat held on the mooring at Gale force + winds on on Cape Cod? Or are you talking about having it held at a slip at a dock? A mooring would be about 100 years off shore with a 2500 lb. piece of granite on the bottom about 25 feet down.

What have others had their boats moored at in regard to winds and what size line were they using?

Since I have a trailer Sailer, I would be inclined to get her off the mooring and out of the water if Gale Force Winds are predicted. But I'm hoping to hear from others.
 

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Are you saying the Your boat held on the mooring at Gale force + winds on on Cape Cod? Or are you talking about having it held at a slip at a dock? A mooring would be about 100 years off shore with a 2500 lb. piece of granite on the bottom about 25 feet down.

What have others had their boats moored at in regard to winds and what size line were they using?

Since I have a trailer Sailer, I would be inclined to get her off the mooring and out of the water if Gale Force Winds are predicted. But I'm hoping to hear from others.
This was a 38 ft boat, we were on our way to Maine and in the Portsmouth area on a friends mooring. We actually went out and bought this pennant and attached it to our friends mooring to ride out the storm as we were not happy with what was there.

If I had a trailer sailer, sure I'd haul every time and head well inland by car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
This was a 38 ft boat, we were on our way to Maine and in the Portsmouth area on a friends mooring. We actually went out and bought this pennant and attached it to our friends mooring to ride out the storm as we were not happy with what was there.

If I had a trailer sailer, sure I'd haul every time and head well inland by car.
Well... I live in Bar Harbor, and moor at the yacht club there, just north of town in Hulls Cove. I can take her out by heading north around Frenchman's Bay into the giant ramp on the Mainland at Morris Yachts. Then I drive the nine miles back to my pretty much protected house.

I never moored before, but the wife wanted to be able to go out for a couple of hours in the middle of the day. To trailer takes(with Driving to the ramp and getting stuff ready, and stepping the mast) a good two hours just to get into the water. So the mooring is about 4 minutes from our house.

We have decide at what point we will take her out of the water completely. You can actually sail a West Wight Potter 19 in 30 knots(not fun but you can do it)so I'm figuring Gale Warnings would a time to take her out completely.
When we leave in the summer, we take her out of the water. I'd be more concerned about the wind ripping the horn cleat out of the boat since that's probably the weakest point of the mooring. We have a friend at the club who has a 30 foot motor boat and is going to France for two weeks in august, and will have his boat pulled from the water by the boat yard. One never knows up here, as you know, living out on the Cape.
 
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